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20124

You are a victim of branch prediction fail. What is Branch Prediction? Consider a railroad junction: Image by Mecanismo, via Wikimedia Commons. Used under the CC-By-SA 3.0 license. Now for the sake of argument, suppose this is back in the 1800s - before long distance or radio communication. You are the operator of a junction and you hear a train ...


5256

--> is not an operator. It is in fact two separate operators, -- and >. The conditional's code decrements x, while returning x's original (not decremented) value, and then compares the original value with 0 using the > operator. To better understand, the statement could be written as follows: while( (x--) > 0 )


4143

How can it be? Isn't the memory of a local variable inaccessible outside its function? You rent a hotel room. You put a book in the top drawer of the bedside table and go to sleep. You check out the next morning, but "forget" to give back your key. You steal the key! A week later, you return to the hotel, do not check in, sneak into your old room with ...


2505

Beginner Introductory, no previous programming experience Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++ (Bjarne Stroustrup) (updated for C++11/C++14) An introduction to programming using C++ by the creator of the language. A good read, that assumes no previous programming experience, but is not only for beginners. Introductory, with previous ...


2308

Branch prediction. With a sorted array, the condition data[c] >= 128 is first false for a streak of values, then becomes true for all later values. That's easy to predict. With an unsorted array, you pay the branching cost.


2031

Setting a bit Use the bitwise OR operator (|) to set a bit. number |= 1 << x; That will set bit x. Clearing a bit Use the bitwise AND operator (&) to clear a bit. number &= ~(1 << x); That will clear bit x. You must invert the bit string with the bitwise NOT operator (~), then AND it. Toggling a bit The XOR operator (^) can be ...


1837

In C++, the compiler is allowed to make one implicit conversion to resolve the parameters to a function. What this means is that the compiler can use constructors callable with a single parameter to convert from one type to another in order to get the right type for a parameter. Here's an example class with a constructor that can be used for implicit ...


1783

That's a very complicated operator, so even ISO/IEC JTC1 (Joint Technical Committee 1) placed its description in two different parts of the C++ Standard. Joking aside, they are two different operators: -- and > described respectively in §5.2.6/2 and §5.9 of the C++03 Standard.


1780

The reason why the performance improves drastically when the data is sorted is that the branch prediction penalty is removed, as explained beautifully in Mysticial's answer. Now, if we look at the code if (data[c] >= 128) sum += data[c]; we can find that the meaning of this particular if... else... branch is to add something when a condition is ...


1581

static_cast is the first cast you should attempt to use. It does things like implicit conversions between types (such as int to float, or pointer to void*), and it can also call explicit conversion functions (or implicit ones). In many cases, explicitly stating static_cast isn't necessary, but it's important to note that the T(something) syntax is equivalent ...


1568

I use this to split string by a delim. The first puts the results in a pre-constructed vector, the second returns a new vector. #include <string> #include <sstream> #include <vector> std::vector<std::string> &split(const std::string &s, char delim, std::vector<std::string> &elems) { std::stringstream ss(s); ...


1318

No, it will not be faster on most architectures. You didn't specify, but on x86, all of the integral comparisons will be typically implemented in two machine instructions: A test or cmp instruction, which sets EFLAGS And a Jcc (jump) instruction, depending on the comparison type (and code layout): jne - Jump if not equal --> ZF = 0 jz - Jump if zero ...


1303

Overview Why do we need the copy-and-swap idiom? Any class that manages a resource (a wrapper, like a smart pointer) needs to implement The Big Three. While the goals and implementation of the copy-constructor and destructor are straightforward, the copy-assignment operator is arguably the most nuanced and difficult. How should it be done? What pitfalls ...


1283

I find it easiest to understand move semantics with example code. Let's start with a very simple string class which only holds a pointer to a heap-allocated block of memory: #include <cstring> #include <algorithm> class string { char* data; public: string(const char* p) { size_t size = strlen(p) + 1; data = new ...


1268

If you are curious about even more optimizations that can be done to this code, consider this... Starting with the original loop: for (unsigned i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) { for (unsigned j = 0; j < arraySize; ++j) { if (data[j] >= 128) sum += data[j]; } } With loop interchange, we can safely change this loop to: for ...


1223

Welcome to the world of denormalized floating-point! They can wreak havoc on performance!!! Denormal (or subnormal) numbers are kind of a hack to get some extra values very close to zero out of the floating point representation. Operations on denormalized floating-point can be tens to hundreds of times slower than on normalized floating-point. This is ...


1214

Upon further analysis of this, I believe this is (at least partially) caused by data alignment of the four pointers. This will cause some level of cache bank/way conflicts. If I've guessed correctly on how you are allocating your arrays, they are likely to be aligned to the page line. This means that all your accesses in each loop will fall on the same ...


1209

First, you have to learn to think like a Language Lawyer. The C++ specification does not make reference to any particular compiler, operating system, or CPU. It makes reference to an abstract machine that is a generalization of actual systems. In the Language Lawyer world, the job of the programmer is to write code for the abstract machine; the job of the ...


1201

This one actually compiles to assembly that doesn't have any conditionals: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> void main(int j) { printf("%d\n", j); (&main + (&exit - &main)*(j/1000))(j+1); } Edit: Added '&' so it will consider the address hence evading the pointer errors. This version of the above in standard C, ...


1097

static_cast static_cast is used for cases where you basically want to reverse an implicit conversion, with a few restrictions and additions. static_cast performs no runtime checks. This should be used if you know that you refer to an object of a specific type, and thus a check would be unnecessary. Example: void func(void *data) { // Conversion from ...


1095

Introduction C++ treats variables of user-defined types with value semantics. This means that objects are implicitly copied in various contexts, and we should understand what "copying an object" actually means. Let us consider a simple example: class person { std::string name; int age; public: person(const std::string& name, int age) : ...


1032

No doubt some of us would be interested in ways of identifying code that is problematic for the CPU's branch-predictor. The Valgrind tool cachegrind has a branch-predictor simulator, enabled by using the --branch-sim=yes flag. Running it over the examples in this question, with the number of outer loops reduced to 10000 and compiled with g++, gives these ...


1024

A smart pointer is a class that wraps a 'raw' (or 'bare') C++ pointer, to manage the lifetime of the object being pointed to. There is no single smart pointer type, but all of them try to abstract a raw pointer in a practical way. Smart pointers should be preferred over raw pointers. If you feel you need to use pointers (first consider if you really do), ...


983

I'm a C++ newbie myself, but here is how I understood not just what virtual functions are, but why they're required: Let's say you have these two classes: class Animal { public: void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating generic food."; } } class Cat : public Animal { public: void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating a rat."; } } In your main ...


961

Read it backwards (as driven by Clockwise/Spiral Rule)... int* - pointer to int int const * - pointer to const int int * const - const pointer to int int const * const - const pointer to const int Now the first const can be on either side of the type so: const int * == int const * const int * const == int const * const If you want to go really crazy ...


949

It's very unfortunate that you see dynamic allocation so often. That just shows how many bad C++ programmers there are. In a sense, you have two questions bundled up into one. The first is when should we use dynamic allocation (using new)? The second is when should we use pointers? The important take-home message is that you should always use the ...


919

This is not related to performance at all. But consider this: You are using two libraries called Foo and Bar: using namespace foo; using namespace bar; Everything works fine, you can call Blah() from Foo and Quux() from Bar without problems. But one day you upgrade to a new version of Foo 2.0, which now offers a function called Quux(). Now you've got a ...


914

Culprit: False Data Dependency (and the compiler isn't even aware of it) On Sandy/Ivy Bridge and Haswell processors, the instruction: popcnt src, dest appears to have a false dependency on the destination register dest. Even though the instruction only writes to it, the instruction will wait until dest is ready before executing. This dependency doesn't ...


907

If your goal is to use a profiler, use one of the suggested ones. However, if you're in a hurry and you can manually interrupt your program under the debugger while it's being subjectively slow, there's a simple way to find performance problems. Just halt it several times, and each time look at the call stack. If there is some code that is wasting some ...


853

For what it's worth, here's another way to extract tokens from an input string, relying only on standard library facilities. It's an example of the power and elegance behind the design of the STL. #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <sstream> #include <algorithm> #include <iterator> int main() { using namespace ...



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