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33

Sure, use decltype: auto var_a = bar(t); decltype(var_a) b; You can add cv-qualifiers and references to decltype specifiers as if it were any other type: const decltype(var_a)* b;


16

decltype(var_a) var_b; And a Lorem Ipsum to reach the required minimum of 30 characters per answer.


13

Non-virtual inheritance: struct Beer : Alcohol {}; struct Wine : Alcohol {}; // I'll have what he's having! Alcohol Alcohol // ...whe-ere'sh my... bayshe clashhh... hic ^ ^ | | Beer Wine ^ ^ \ / \ / Cider Virtual inheritance: struct Beer : virtual Alcohol {}; ...


11

another approach could be to have a check in bar to test if the type is in the sequence, else barf with a useful error message, this avoid any inheritance tricks.. #include <iostream> struct E {}; struct F {}; template <class... As> class Foo { template <typename U> static constexpr bool contains() { return false; } ...


11

Despite the nice answer of @TartanLlama, this is another way one can use decltype to name actually the given type: int f() { return 42; } void g() { // Give the type a name... using my_type = decltype(f()); // ... then use it as already showed up my_type var_a = f(); my_type var_b = var_a; const my_type &var_c = var_b; } int ...


9

In case you don't actually need the bars and instead just need to constrain foo - we can use SFINAE to allow a call to it only with a type convertible to one of the As: template <class... As> class Foo { public: template <class T, class = std::enable_if_t<any<std::is_convertible<T, As>::value...>::value>> void ...


8

I am pretty sure it is not correct. int foo(const int []); int foo(const int [4]); int foo(const int *); should all declare the same function. Having said that, what you may want is: template<int Size> class MyClass { public: MyClass(const int (&data)[Size]); }; template<int Size> MyClass<Size> ::MyClass(const int ...


9

a=b; After this assignment a points to the same location as b ("Secure Coding"). You have lost any reference to the initial location pointed by a, so essentially "Insecure Coding" is garbage that cannot be freed. Another issue is that you are freeing the same pointer twice. After the first free you no longer own that memory. See: What happens when you ...


8

An operator function cannot have default arguments (8.3.6), except where explicitly stated below. (C++14 standard, [over.oper]/8; an identical sentence appears in the C++03 standard). The specific case where default arguments are allowed is the case of the function call operator (operator(); see [over.call]/1). In all other cases they are disallowed.


7

I would suggest workaround C: Isolate your code such that the meta library use and the ncurses use are in separate translation units in your project. This way in any particular translation unit there isn't one symbol being used as both a namespace and a global function.


7

With c++11, using the standard random library of c++11, you can do this: #include <iostream> #include <random> int main() { /* Seed */ std::random_device rd; /* Random number generator */ std::default_random_engine generator(rd()); /* Distribution on which to apply the generator */ std::uniform_int_distribution<long long ...


7

Pseudo code: void ExploreCell(int x, int y) { if (x or y are out of bounds (less than zero/greater than max)) or (this cell is a mountain, because mountains don't explode)) return else if this location is a mine ExplodeMine(x, y) //This cell is a mine, so it blows up again else DestroyCell(x, y) //This cell is a ...


7

It's called emplace(): std::map<std::string, std::string> m; // uses pair's template constructor m.emplace("d", "ddd");


6

#include <unordered_map> #include <utility> #include <tuple> #include <cstddef> template <typename... Tkeys> class C { public: std::tuple<std::unordered_map<Tkeys, int>... > maps; template <typename... Args> void foo(Args&&... keys) { ...


6

When auto is deduced, it is not deduced to the reference. It always deduces to the value. If you want to have a reference to returned value, you can have auto&, const auto& or auto&&. And yes, it is by design. Any other behavior would actually be quite surprising. What is even worse, it is easy to use a reference when you want. However, ...


6

You can solve this pretty easily with std::min and using the version that takes a std::initializer_list. You call min on the three variables to get the minimum and then you have three if statements to check the return against each of the variables. void foo(int a, int b, int c) { int min = std::min({a, b, c}); if (min == a) { // a case ...


6

First of all, in C++ you'd write that as: dpt[key_t] += rat; That will do only one map lookup - as opposed to the code you wrote which does 2 lookups in the case that key_t isn't in the map and 3 lookups in the case that it is. And in Python, you'd write it much the same way - assuming you declare dpt to be the right thing: dpt = ...


6

That's one typical use of std::prev. If you want to remove all elements except the last one, the most idiomatic way to do it is by using std::prev (which basically uses std::advance) on your end iterator. myList.erase(myList.begin(), std::prev(myList.end())); Example: #include <iostream> #include <iterator> #include <list> int main(){ ...


6

No... and by the way with memset you don't have a guaranteed constant-time operation either (in most implementation is just very fast but still linear in the number of elements). If you need to do this kind of operation (addition/subtraction of a constant over a range) on a very huge vector a lot of times and you need to get the final result then you can ...


6

You need an extra argument for the specialization: template <class T, size_t N> struct array_element<T[N]> { using type = T; }; Alternatively: std::remove_reference<decltype(a[0])>::type element = a[0]; Or: auto element = a[0];


5

template <class A, class... As> class Foo : public Foo<As...> { protected: using Foo<As...>::foo; public: using Foo<As...>::bar; void bar(const A& a) { foo(a); } }; template <class A> class Foo<A> { protected: template <class T> void foo(const T& t) { } public: void bar(const A& ...


5

While it's possible to pass the sizes like that in C, it's not possible in C++. The reason being that C++ doesn't have variable-length arrays. Arrays in C++ must have its size fixed at the time of compilation. And no, making the size arguments const does not make them compile-time constants. I recommend you use std::array (or possible std::vector) instead.


5

No new thread is created for mainWindow The mainWindow event loop is executed in scope of a.exec() - it blocks until application exits (for example - last top-level window is closed). So mainWindow does not go out of scope, because it is main that executes everything. Check it using code like: std::cout << "starting application event loop" ...


5

As a uniformly random number in the range [0, 2^64) is just 64 random bits, you can just use the return values of std::mt19937_64 directly: #include <random> int main () { std::mt19937_64 gen (std::random_device{}()); std::uint64_t randomNumber = gen(); } Note that seeding a Mersenne Twister engine with a single 32 bit seed is not optimal, ...


5

In ancient times before c++11 arrived people dealt with it using pure templates. template <class Bar> void foo_impl(Bar var_a) { Bar var_b; //var_b is of the same type as var_a } template <class T> void foo(T t) { foo_impl(bar(t)); } F_1 bar(T_1 t) { } F_2 bar(T_2 t) { }


6

The syntax that you used appeared in the C++ 11 standard, so you should ensure two things: your g++ compiler version supports it (all modern compilers do it) and you have specified that C++ 11 standard should be used. E.g. g++ cpp122.cpp -std=c++11 You can also try -std=c++14 for C++ 14 features. For g++ before version 6.1 the default mode was ...


5

n == (0 || 1 || 2 || 3 || 4 || 5 || 6 || 7 || 8 || 9) This doesn't mean what you think it means. That big logical or chain will all just collapse to true, so you're really checking if n == 1. You probably just want this: n >= 0 && n < 10


5

The thing to understand here is that reference type is a separate concept from value category. string && rValRef = std::move(two); string newS(rValRef); On that second line, the type of rValRef is an rvalue reference to std::string, but the value category of rValRef is lvalue. A good rule-of-thumb for this is if you can take the address of ...


4

Read an integer, a string, a boolean and another integer, then throw them all away and use std::getline to read the rest of the line. After your edit. You don't need the last part (the "Play"/"Don't play" strings) to create four different structures, you can create and partially initialize them, and then read the last part and finish the structure ...


4

this is only available when you are writing code as part of a non-static method of a class. In your particular case, it seems obvious to you that this should refer to key, but the compiler sees no reason for that. Also, string.substr() takes an integer indicating the beginning position. string.end() returns an iterator, which will not work. What you ...



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