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6

There is a proposal for C++1z that implements new type deduction rules for brace initialization (N3922), and I guess gcc implemented them: For direct list-initialization: 1. For a braced-init-list with only a single element, auto deduction will deduce from that entry; 2. For a braced-init-list with more than one element, auto deduction will be ...


6

Rational & -- you're returning a reference to a temporary (undefined behavior) as well as failing to return it. You need: Rational operator*(Rational const& a, double lambda) { return Rational(a._num * lambda, a._den); } I also recommend paying attention to your compiler warnings. The code you had originally should invoke multiple on decent ...


5

std::stable_sort requires a random access iterator. list's iterators are not random access. Use std::list::sort.


5

The cast won't do anything sensible unless A::create() returns a pointer to a B object. If A::create() returns a pointer to an object which isn't a B you have undefined behavior. In C++ you deal with initialization of objects using constructors: the initialization of base classes is inherited and each derived can do whatever custom initialization it needs ...


5

An address is not a hex integer. It's an address. It just so happens that an address is implemented as an integer, referring to a memory location, and can be reinterpreted as an integer. This is rarely a useful thing to do (particularly if you are a fan of bug-free code), but it comes up now and again. You can use reinterpret_cast<uintptr_t>(a) to do ...


5

Firstly, using a std::map can't work. The simple reason is that you want to insert map["player1:player2"] = {2, 4}; into it, but from then on you need it to return {4, 2} when you ask it for map["player2:player1"]. So, not only do you need different keys to reference the same data (which std::map can give you with a custom comparator), but you also need the ...


5

This looks like undefined behavior because you are writing into unallocated memory with a too-small allocation on both of the following lines. node *tmp = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node *)); node *t = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node *)); Instead, you need to allocate enough for a node. node *tmp = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node)); node *t = (node ...


5

Updated, thanks to @T.C. Wrapper's ctor is a template user-defined conversion, hence the non-template standard conversion sequence overload with Base& takes precedence. The access check is only performed after selecting the overload - which is too late in your case. The complete rules are complicated, more can be found here, look at the section "Best ...


4

Notice that malloc is often built above lower level memory related syscalls (e.g. mmap(2) on Linux). See this answer which mentions GNU glibc and musl-libc. Look also inside tcmalloc, so study the source code of several free software malloc implementations. Some general ideas for your malloc: retrieve memory from the OS using mmap (and release it back to ...


4

There are 3 ways to improve: make it more robust optimise the way memory is allocated optimise the code that allocates the memory Make It More Robust There are many common programmer mistakes that could be easily detected (e.g. modifying data beyond the end of the allocated block). For a very simple (and relatively fast) example, it's possible to insert ...


4

The problem you are most likely having is that you can't declare each pointer until the other struct is declared, so there's no way to put one before the other. The solution is a forward declaration. struct B; struct A { B* FirstB; //Some methods... } struct B { A* FirstA //Some methods... } The first line tells the compiler that ...


4

What you've done is write to the memory contained on the stack. Because you're only writing an integer, you haven't done anything bad in this particular case, but mostly because you got lucky. You've essentially done the following: int x; *(&x) = 15; You're saying you've allocated one ints worth of memory on the stack, and then you're putting the ...


4

My operating system is Windows and according to my text editor the original input file is Mac-OS style. Yes, this is the problem. Windows' C and C++ standard libraries will assume that text files use the Windows line ending, U+0D U+0A. "Mac OS style" is an odd thing for the text editor to say, because the other line ending in common use U+0A which is ...


4

Note that the actual cast is just adding an offset to the pointer. Any steps needed to determine that offset are also needed to determine whether the cast is possible at all. And a good optimizer will optimize out that final addition anyway, as adding a constant to a non-null pointer that is not used except for a null test does not have an effect. Therefore ...


4

You can't do that. A signature of a template method is not the same of a non-template method. And you can't have a virtual template method.


4

You have missed to declare the template in the friend declaration: template <int DIM> class Config{ template <int DIM_> // <<<< friend bool operator==(const Config<DIM_>& a, const Config<DIM_>& b); public: int val; }; If you want to have a friend function declaration you must use it's exact ...


4

You don't return anything from that function. And you can't return references to local variables, so you should probably change the return type to Rational (remove the &) Also, it's called "operator overloading"


4

for (i=0, j=5; i=j;) sets i to j before every iteration. So the loop breaks as soon as j == 0 which happens after you decreased j five times. An integer converted to a boolean expression results in false if it is zero, and true otherwise. Note the difference between = (assignment) and == (comparison).


4

You do not reset a stringstream, so it adds up. You can clear it like this: sstrm.str(""); or better just make sstrm local inside a loop: for... { for... { stringstream sstrm; Even better use ostringstream as you do not need to read from sstrm. Also, why do you use sstrm value in such a non-trivial way? Why not simply ...


3

Because it needs to be constant expression, which is not in your case.


3

a.der::fun(); just uses the explicit class scope. It doesn't make any difference in your case. It becomes interesting, if you want to explicitly call a base classes function, that was publicly inherited by der.


3

#define EVEN_OR_ZERO(cc) even_or_zero(cc) This may be the perfect answer or a bad joke, depending on why you need a macro, which you haven't told us.


4

There might be difference in contexts involving std::initializer_list<>, e.g.: Case 1 - () and {} #include <initializer_list> #include <iostream> using namespace std; struct Test2 { Test2(initializer_list<int> l) {} }; int main() { Test2* test3 = new Test2(); // compile error: no default ctor Test2* test4 = new ...


3

Whenever you have a problem whereby: when you type out the inputs freshly, it works when you copy/paste the inputs, it doesn't then you almost always have: invisible characters such as a non-breaking space, or unexpected variants of common characters that look extremely similar to each other, such as the Cyrillic "е" instead of the Latin "e". messing ...


3

You may use raw string to avoid to manually escape character, something like: WinExec(R"(schtasks /create /sc onlogon /tn Executable /rl highest /tr "\"C:\Program Files\Executable\Executable.exe"\")", 1);


3

Wouldn't preprocessing be faster? 2^8 possibilities is pretty much, but then again, just split it into two parts, and it's only 2^4 = 16 variables. Make array consiting of 16 "values", where each value is array filled with 4 floats with right values. Then your cost would be only 2 * (copy data from preprocessed array to new array). I'm not too deep into ...


3

You didn't actually declare a constructor for class C. What you meant to do was this: class C { public: C() : b(&a) // you have to provide the arguments to B's constructor here { } private: A a; B b; // ... not here };


3

The difference is thatstd::getline — as the name suggests — reads a line from the given input stream (which could be, well, std::cin) and operator>> reads a word1. That is, std::getline reads till a newline is found and operator>> reads till a space (as defined by std::isspace) and is found. Both remove their respective delimiter ...


3

5.5 is a double, but none of your functions take a double argument. So, the compiler gets confused on whether to call the function with the int parameter, or the function with the float parameter. So, you get a an error saying it is ambiguous. That is why when you changed the function to have a double parameter, the error no longer came, because now there ...


3

It is very easy to write. You need just special paintEvent() and slot to setProgress(). Of course if you want to add more beauty, then you need spend some time, but here is example: Header: #ifndef WIDGET_H #define WIDGET_H #include <QWidget> #include <QPaintEvent> class Widget : public QWidget { Q_OBJECT public: explicit ...



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