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221

There are several ways, but first you need to understand why object cleanup is important, and hence the reason std::exit is marginalized among C++ programmers. RAII and Stack Unwinding C++ makes use of a idiom called RAII, which in simple terms means objects should perform initialization in the constructor and cleanup in the destructor. For instance the ...


210

The author of this code presumably had to support EBCDIC at some point, where the numeric values of the letters are non-contiguous (gaps exist between I, J and R, S, as you may have guessed). It is worth noting that the C and C++ standards only guarantee that the characters 0 to 9 have contiguous numeric values for precisely this reason, so neither of these ...


95

The + is interpreted as a unary plus operator. It simply returns the promoted value of its operand.


94

It depends on the machine you're targeting. On a machine that uses a 2's complement representation for integers there's no difference at bit-level between 0 and -0 (they have the same representation) If your machine used one's complement, you definitely could 0000 0000 -> signed  0  1111 1111 -> signed −0 Obviously we're talking about using ...


69

void foo() { base:foo(); } is equivalent to: void foo() { base: // An unused label. foo(); // Calls the function again, resulting in infinite recursion. } Due to infinite recursion, the function causes stack overflow.


57

GCC supports the function __builtin_expect(long exp, long c) to provide this kind of feature. You can check the documentation here. Where exp is the condition used and c is the expected value. For example in you case you would want if (__builtin_expect(normal, 1)) Because of the awkward syntax this is usually used by defining two custom macros like ...


53

Looks like it attempts to cover both EBCDIC and ASCII. Your alternative method doesn't work for EBCDIC (it has false positives, but no false negatives) C and C++ do require that '0'-'9' are contiguous. Note that the standard library calls do know whether they run on ASCII, EBCDIC or other systems, so they're more portable and possibly more efficient.


50

Someone else can find the standard quote but I'm going to explain conceptually. It doesn't work because a using-declaration only affects name lookup. Your using-declaration causes name lookup to succeed where it would otherwise fail, that is, it tells the compiler where to find the function f. But it does not tell it which A subobject f acts on, that is, ...


48

You can initialize arrays in both ways. Using curly inner braces are optional, but it's recommended, cause they improve the readibility. The easiest way to find the value of the element of non-formated with braces multi-dimensional array is by splitting the array. For example, your array's dimensions are 2x3x2: First split the array into 2 sets (2x3x2) ...


43

Let's start with a bit of code: class A { using MutexType = std::mutex; using ReadLock = std::unique_lock<MutexType>; using WriteLock = std::unique_lock<MutexType>; mutable MutexType mut_; std::string field1_; std::string field2_; public: ... I've put some rather suggestive type aliases in there that we won't ...


41

Raw string literals let you specify an almost arbitrary* delimiter: //choose ### as the delimiter so only )###" ends the string R"###( Some Text)" )###"; *The exact rules are: "any member of the basic source character set except: space, the left parenthesis (, the right parenthesis ), the backslash \, and the control characters representing ...


39

I think it may indeed be due to branch prediction. If you count the number of swaps compared to the number of inner sort iterations you find: Limit = 10 A = 560M swaps / 1250M loops B = 1250M swaps / 1250M loops (0.02% less swaps than loops) Limit = 50000 A = 627M swaps / 1250M loops B = 850M swaps / 1250M loops So in the Limit == 10 case the swap ...


34

gcc has long __builtin_expect (long exp, long c) (emphasis mine): You may use __builtin_expect to provide the compiler with branch prediction information. In general, you should prefer to use actual profile feedback for this (-fprofile-arcs), as programmers are notoriously bad at predicting how their programs actually perform. However, there are ...


34

Well, I got beaten to it. I'll post this anyway. Edit : well, after reading Nim's answer, mine does achieve the exact syntax OP wished for. #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> struct with_separator { with_separator(std::string sep) : sep(std::move(sep)) {} std::string const sep; }; struct separated_stream { ...


34

Just change the comparator. Suppose you want to order by year, then by month, then by amount, then: std::sort( values.begin(), values.end(), [ ]( const MyStruct& lhs, const MyStruct& rhs ) { return std::tie(lhs.year, lhs.month, lhs.amount) < std::tie(rhs.year, rhs.month, rhs.amount); }); std::tuple's operator< does a ...


34

The type of the expression '1' is char. The type of the expression (test ? 3 : '1') is at least int (or an unsigned version thereof; portably it is std::common_type_t<int, char>). Therefore the two invocations of the << operator select different overloads: The former prints the character as is, the latter formats the integer as its decimal ...


31

According to the standard (9 Classes [class], emphasis mine): A standard-layout class is a class that: ... — has the same access control (Clause 11) for all non-static data members, ... and A POD struct is a non-union class that is both a trivial class and a standard-layout class, and ... Your hunch is correct, because B.m1 and ...


31

There was a #define union struct in a header file of the project I was debugging. I am crying.


29

5.3.3 Sizeof [expr.sizeof] 1) The sizeof operator yields the number of bytes in the object representation of its operand. The operand is either an expression, which is an unevaluated operand (Clause 5), or a parenthesized type-id. The sizeof operator shall not be applied to an expression that has function or incomplete type, to the parenthesized ...


29

One possible aspect is that unsigned integers can lead to somewhat hard-to-spot problems in loops, because the underflow leads to large numbers. I cannot count (even with an unsigned integer!) how many times I made a variant of this bug for(size_t i = foo.size(); i >= 0; --i) ... Note that, by definition, i >= 0 is always true. (What causes this ...


27

Why is it I get segmentation faults instead? The segmentation fault, what you're seeing, is a side-effect of the stack overflow. The reason is stack overflow, the result is segmentation fault. From the wikipedia article for "stack overflow" (emphasis mine) .... When a program attempts to use more space than is available on the call stack (that is, ...


27

Conceptually it doesn't make a lot of sense. Consider a bag of different colored marbles. And lets say you have two bags of marbles: Contains red, blue, green. Contains purple, red, yellow. Is bag 1 < bag 2? Even if you associate an order to the colors, say: red < yellow < purple < blue < green It is still difficult to say if one bag ...


27

There's a note in [namespace.udecl]/p17 that addresses this situation directly: [ Note: Because a using-declaration designates a base class member (and not a member subobject or a member function of a base class subobject), a using-declaration cannot be used to resolve inherited member ambiguities. For example, struct A { int x(); }; struct B : A ...


26

If you want that to mean that you can pass any type to the function, make it a template: template <typename T> int function(T data); There's a proposal for C++17 to allow the syntax you used (as C++14 already does for generic lambdas), but it's not standard yet.


26

Yes, in the case of the code in the OP. Because the destructor is trivial, calling it doesn't end the object's lifetime. [basic.life]/p1: The lifetime of an object of type T ends when: if T is a class type with a non-trivial destructor (12.4), the destructor call starts, or the storage which the object occupies is reused or released. ...


26

One big factor is that it makes loop logic harder: Imagine you want to iterate over all but the last element of an array (which does happen in the real world). So you write your function: void fun (const std::vector<int> &vec) { for (std::size_t i = 0; i < vec.size() - 1; ++i) do_something(vec[i]); } Looks good, doesn't it? It ...


26

No, there is not. (At least on modern x86 processors.) __builtin_expect mentioned in other answers influences the way gcc arranges the assembly code. It does not directly influence the CPU's branch predictor. Of course, there will be indirect effects on branch prediction caused by reordering the code. But on modern x86 processors there is no instruction ...


25

It's called "flexible array member" and it's a feature of C99 (I think). It's not valid C++ - you don't have warnings/errors, probably because the compiler supports it as an extension. Compiling with -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=c++NN (98, 03, 11, 14, ..) should generate warning (the last two flags will disable any compiler extensions). You can see some ...


25

Well, the answer is "historical reasons". In C you could have function declarations at block scope, and the C++ designers did not see the benefit in removing that option. An example usage would be: #include <iostream> int main() { int func(); func(); } int func() { std::cout << "Hello\n"; } IMO this is a bad idea because it is ...


24

RVO/NRVO are clearly allowed under the "as-if" rule in C. In C++ you can get observable side-effects because you've overloaded the constructor, destructor, and/or assignment operator to give those side effects (e.g., print something out when one of those operations happens), but in C you don't have any ability to overload those operators, and the built-in ...



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