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142

A computer is like an onion, it has many many layers, from the inner core of pure hardware to the outermost application layer. Each layer exposes parts of itself to the next outer layer, so that the outer layer may use some of the inner layers functionality. In the case of e.g. Windows the operating system exposes the so-called WIN32 API for applications ...


47

You're right that in general, libraries cannot make anything possible that isn't already possible. But the libraries don't have to be written in C++ in order to be usable by a C++ program. Even if they are written in C++, they may internally use other libraries not written in C++. So the fact that C++ didn't provide any way to do it doesn't prevent it from ...


42

I wouldn't worry about it. If you look at the interface of std::array<T, N>, it is very small and most member functions (basically providing wrappers for pointer manipulation) are one-liners that will be completely optimized away / inlined by any decent compiler on Release mode optimization levels. Furthermore, you don't pay for what you don't use ...


30

C and C++ have 2 properties that allow all this extensibility that the OP is talking about. C and C++ can access memory C and C++ can call assembly code for instructions not in the C or C++ language. In the kernel or in a basic non-protected mode platform, peripherals like the serial port or disk drive are mapped into memory map in the same way as RAM ...


27

The values of the character constants \r and \n was the exact same in Classic Mac OS environments as it was everywhere else: \r was CR was ASCII 13 (0x0d); \n was LF was ASCII 10 (0x0a). The only thing that was different on Classic Mac OS was that \r was used as the "standard" line ending in text editors, just like \n is used on UNIX systems, or \r\n on DOS ...


24

My personal preference: just keep the extra index. It's clear as it is, and in case you ever have an if() inside the loop, you can also easily skip the count: std::list<std::string> items; { int i = 0; for (auto & item : items) { if (some_condition(item)) { item += std::to_string(i); // mark item as the i-th match ...


23

It's meant to crash the program, typically useful during debugging. It'll dereference the NULL pointer and attempt to assign a value to that memory, which is theoretically just undefined behavior, but will result in an access violation exception on 99% of systems. Typically, it's found in cases such as: if ( !FileRead(importantFile) ) { // this should ...


18

Your slide is mostly wrong... There is a 1-to-1 mapping between assembly and machine code. Assembly is a textual representation of the information, and machine code is a binary representation. Some machines however, support additional assembly instructions, but what instructions are included in the produced assembly code is still determined at compile ...


16

Languages (like C++11) are specifications, on paper, usually written in English. Look inside the latest C++11 draft (or buy the costly final spec from your ISO vendor). You generally use a computer with some language implementation (You could in principle run a C++ program without any computer, e.g. using a bunch of human slaves interpreting it; that would ...


15

A struct in C++ is actually a class definition where its content are public, unless specified otherwise by including a protected: or private: section. When the compiler sees a class or struct, it first digests all the declarations within the block ({}) before operating on them. In the regular method case, the compiler hasn't yet seen the type declared.


14

You do not create a reference-to-reference in your code. It is just another int&, i.e. both are references to an int (T.C. shows an example of an illegal C++03 reference to reference) The C++11 Standard section § 8.3.2 explicitly shows this by an example (disallowing references of references, of course, did not change between C++03 and C++11, but ...


14

I think the concept you are missing is system calls. Each operating system provides an enormous amount of resources and functionality that you can tap into to do low-level operating system related things. Even when you call a regular library function, it is probably making a system call behind the scenes. System calls are a low-level way of making use of ...


14

You are linking to libraries when you link with g++ main.o -o program. A few libraries are auto-linked by default, and the only way to not link to them is to pass -nodefaultlibs (or equivalent). In particular, you'll find cout in libstdc++, which in turn uses libc. Both of those are linked by default. If you have ldd installed, you can verify this by ...


14

You already know about the #undef option, which would do what you need. There is another option however. You could completely hide the fact that your A uses library C from your users: Define your own types and interface in the header and class definition of A and remove the library include from your A header. Then in your implementation file you can include ...


13

It's because of the ; after the else: else; That ends the statement too early, so the next line has nothing to do with the if conditions. You should get into the habit of putting curly braces around your if blocks: if (feeling == "Good") { cout << "That's great!"; } else if (feeling == "Okay") { cout << "Fair enough."; } else { cout ...


13

It's a bit of a strange syntax in C++ but if you're familiar with JS (for example), you might be aware of the concept of method chaining. This is a bit like that. add_options() returns an object with operator() defined. The second line calls operator() on the object returned by the first line. The method returns a reference to the original object, so you ...


13

C++ ranges are defined as [first, last), and all the STL algorithm work like that. In this case, std::accumulate sums up all the elements behind the iterator-defined range, starting with first and ending at last without actually dereferencing it. Thus, calling it like std::accumulate(a, a+3, 0) is actually correct and equal to calling it with ...


12

A lambda with an empty closure may decay to a function pointer but here : static_assert( std::is_same<decltype(f),decltype(f1)>::value,"different types" ); The error is normal, also Visual Studio is laxist, but you miss a typename and default is a reserved keyword. template <typename F,typename R = typename std::result_of<F(T*)>::type> ...


12

There are similar questions to yours answered on SO: 1.What does this '-1.IND' mean? See What do 1.#INF00, -1.#IND00 and -1.#IND mean? 2.It seems NAN processing is compiler dependent, should this be standardized in C++? Why? See A few things about division by zero in C (it says C, but it talks about C++) 3.I used this hack to deal with this ...


12

C++ standard 3.4.1: .4: A name used in global scope, outside of any function, class or user-declared namespace, shall be declared before its use in global scope. This is why global variables and functions cannot be used before an afore declaration. .5: A name used in a user-declared namespace outside of the definition of any function or ...


11

Each printf format specifier requires an argument of some particular type. "%d" requires an argument of type int; "%u" requires an argument of type unsigned int. It is entirely your responsibility to pass arguments of the correct type. unsigned int i = -12; -12 is of type int. The initialization implicitly converts that value from int to unsigned int. ...


11

If implicit addition of decltype would be allowed, some very common templates would become ambiguous, or even impossible to express. Consider the following example : struct tp { template<typename T> void foo() { cout << "Type parameter\n"; } template<int Value> void foo() { cout << "Value parameter\n"; } }; ...


11

Person person = Person(); This declares a Person object called person. It initialises this object with a temporary object created by Person(). That means it'll invoke the copy/move constructor of Person (which will probably be elided). Person person(); This declares a function called person that returns a Person object. This is not a declaration of an ...


11

Nothing in C++ is thread-safe¹ unless explicitly noted. If you need to read object c while it may be modified in another thread, you are responsible for locking it. That is a general rule and there is no reason why reading it for purpose of creating a copy should be an exception. Note, that the copy being created does not need to be locked, because no ...


10

What you may do instead of returning const element is to restrict the method to lvalue object: struct S { S& operator =(const S& rhs) & // note the final & // to restrict this to be lvalue { // implementation return *this; } }; So with S operator +(const S& lhs, const ...


10

The behaviour is expected. A move from both vectors leaves the original v1 with 5 moved-from elements in their second half. The difference is that when the strings are moved, what is left behind is empty strings. This is because it is a very efficient way to move strings, and leave the moved-from string in a self-consistent state (Technically, they could be ...


10

Forget about run-time costs. You should be focused instead about teaching correct methods. Using addressof is not idiomatic if all you are doing is taking the address of a simple variable. What is idiomatic is something like int* a = &b; Your students need to understand what & means in different contexts. I appreciate that your "focus is not on ...


10

foo = (bar == 42) ? answerToEverything : (bar == 23) ? bigMike : useless;


10

0xFFFE is almost the maximum 16-bit number; and only for an unsigned 16-bit number, at that. If you divide it by 100 and then multiply by 182, it's definitely going to overflow. Let's do it fully in base 10 for clarity (0xFFFE is 65534): 65534 / 100 * -0.093081 = -60.99970254 65534 / 100 * 182.241211 = 119429.95521674 The full range of your signed ...


9

§14.5.5.1/1 When a class template is used in a context that requires an instantiation of the class, it is necessary to determine whether the instantiation is to be generated using the primary template or one of the partial specializations. This is done by matching the template arguments of the class template specialization with the template ...



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