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719

Culprit: False Data Dependency (and the compiler isn't even aware of it) On Sandy/Ivy Bridge and Haswell processors, the instruction: popcnt src, dest appears to have a false dependency on the destination register dest. Even though the instruction only writes to it, the instruction will wait until dest is ready before executing. This dependency doesn't ...


255

Algorithmic building blocks We begin by assembling the algorithmic building blocks from the Standard Library: #include <algorithm> // min_element, iter_swap, // upper_bound, rotate, // nth_element, partition, // inplace_merge, // make_heap, ...


247

There are several ways, but first you need to understand why object cleanup is important, and hence the reason std::exit is marginalized among C++ programmers. RAII and Stack Unwinding C++ makes use of a idiom called RAII, which in simple terms means objects should perform initialization in the constructor and cleanup in the destructor. For instance the ...


213

The author of this code presumably had to support EBCDIC at some point, where the numeric values of the letters are non-contiguous (gaps exist between I, J and R, S, as you may have guessed). It is worth noting that the C and C++ standards only guarantee that the characters 0 to 9 have contiguous numeric values for precisely this reason, so neither of these ...


199

It's not just better, it's the only possible way. If you stored a Node object inside itself, what would sizeof(Node) be? It would be sizeof(int) + sizeof(Node), which would be equal to sizeof(int) + (sizeof(int) + sizeof(Node)), which would be equal to sizeof(int) + (sizeof(int) + (sizeof(int) + sizeof(Node))), etc. to infinity. An object like that can't ...


184

TL;DR: The operations are well defined according to the draft C++ standard. Details We can see that by going to the draft C++ standard section 5.9 Relational operators which says (emphasis mine going forward): The operands shall have arithmetic, enumeration, or pointer type, or type std::nullptr_t. The operators < (less than), > (greater than), ...


180

A computer is like an onion, it has many many layers, from the inner core of pure hardware to the outermost application layer. Each layer exposes parts of itself to the next outer layer, so that the outer layer may use some of the inner layers functionality. In the case of e.g. Windows the operating system exposes the so-called WIN32 API for applications ...


165

I am aware of 5 general categories where recompiling a C++03 compiler as C++11 can cause unbounded performance increases that are practically unrelated to quality of implementation. These are all variations of move semantics. std::vector reallocate struct bar{ std::vector<int> data; }; std::vector<bar> foo(1); foo.back().data.push_back(3); ...


164

In Java Node m_node stores a pointer to another node. You don't have a choice about it. In C++ Node *m_node means the same thing. The difference is that in C++ you can actually store the object as opposed to a pointer to it. That's why you have to say you want a pointer. In C++: Node m_node means store the node right here (and that clearly can't ...


156

It is not an error to declare float a = 3.0 : if you do, the compiler will convert the double literal 3.0 to a float for you. However, you should use the float literals notation in specific scenarios. For performance reasons: Specifically, consider: float foo(float x) { return x * 0.42; } Here the compiler will emit a conversion (that you will pay ...


147

The comma operator† evaluates the left hand side, discards its value, and as a result yields the right hand side. WSA_FLAG_OVERLAPPED is 1, and that is the result of the expression; all the other values are discarded. No socket is ever created. † Unless overloaded. Yes, it can be overloaded. No, you should not overload it. Step away from the ...


135

All design processes result in compromises between mutually incompatible goals. Unfortunately, the design process for the overloaded && operator in C++ produced a confusing end result: that the very feature you want from && -- its short-circuiting behavior -- is omitted. The details of how that design process ended up in this unfortunate ...


119

Yes, under the as-if rule the compiler is only obligated to emulate the observable behavior of the code, so if you have a loop that does not have any observable behavior then it can be optimized away completely and therefore will effectively have zero execution time. Examples For example the following code: int main() { int j = 0 ; for( int i = 0; i ...


119

Preprocessor directives like #include are just doing some textual substitution (see the documentation of GNU cpp inside GCC). It can occur at any place (outside of comments and string literals). However, a #include should have its # as the first non-blank character of its line. So you'll code float h[N] = { #include "f1.h" }; The original question did ...


118

Table 4 (Keywords) in N3936 (C++14): alignas continue friend register true alignof decltype goto reinterpret_cast try asm default if return typedef auto delete inline short typeid bool ...


113

It's a bug on the site, as the compiler's output is not properly escaped. The compiler should output &pi;, but that's valid HTML, producing the pi symbol you see.


112

XOR will never go out of bounds because it combines bits and doesn't create new bits where no bits were set before. The result 5 is correct. Look at the binary representation of your value and the XOR result 10 00001010 20 00010100 30 00011110 5 00000101 20 00010100 10 00001010 30 00011110 -------------- 00000101 => 5 An ...


109

All of your bitfield members are signed 1-bit integers. On a two's complement system, that means they can represent only either 0 or -1. Use uint8_t if you want 0 and 1: struct Bits { uint8_t b0:1, b1:1, b2:1, b3:1, b4:1, b5:1, b6:1, b7:1; };


108

The problem is in mapping from the codomain of std::mt19937 (std::uint_fast32_t) to float; the algorithm described by the standard gives incorrect results (inconsistent with its description of the output of the algorithm) when loss of precision occurs if the current IEEE754 rounding mode is anything other than round-to-negative-infinity (note that the ...


107

According to the C++ Standard (7.1.6.2 Simple type specifiers) 3 When multiple simple-type-specifiers are allowed, they can be freely intermixed with other decl-specifiers in any order. So for example the following declaration is valid long static long const int x = 10; You may even use constexpr specifier along with const qualifier. For example ...


107

It's an issue of memory cache. matrix[i][j] has better cache hits than matrix[j][i], since matrix[i][j] has more continuous memory accessing chances. For example, when we access matrix[i][0], the cache may load a continuous segment of memory containing matrix[i][0], thus, accessing matrix[i][1], matrix[i][2], ..., will benefit from caching speed, since ...


104

It depends on the machine you're targeting. On a machine that uses a 2's complement representation for integers there's no difference at bit-level between 0 and -0 (they have the same representation) If your machine used one's complement, you definitely could 0000 0000 -> signed  0  1111 1111 -> signed −0 Obviously we're talking about using ...


102

Is the type identical... Yes. C++11 §7.1.6.2/3 ” When multiple simple-type-specifiers are allowed, they can be freely intermixed with other decl-specifiers in any order.


102

The + is interpreted as a unary plus operator. It simply returns the promoted value of its operand.


98

The point of this code is to help the compiler produce "visible" error messages. In pre static_assert era, compiling a template-heavy code could easily produce ~100 lines of error messages even for a single mistake, and 99% of those lines are often meaningless. The 10 pointers trick is useful to point out the actual error, for example: ...


97

Old question but the remaining answers are outdated as of C++11 - you can simply do: std::map< std::string, std::map<std::string, std::string> > mymap for(auto const &it1 : mymap) { // it1.first is the first key for(auto const &it2 : it1.second) { // it2.first is the second key // it2.second is the data } } this should ...


96

The optimizer has worked out that the inner loop along with the subsequent line is a no-op, and eliminated it. Unfortunately it hasn't managed to eliminate the outer loop as well. Note that the node.js example is faster than the unoptimized C++ example, indicating that V8 (node's JIT compiler) has managed to eliminate at least one of the loops. However, its ...


94

Because you are using char as the underlying type for your fields, the compiler tries to group bits by bytes, and since it cannot put more than eight bits in each byte, it can only store two fields per byte. The total sum of bits your struct uses is 15, so the ideal size to fit that much data would be a short. #include <stdio.h> typedef struct { ...


94

If your definition of EOK is as follows: #define EOK 0; then it would cause this type of error, because it forcibly terminates the if-statement before the else is reached, making it an else without a matching if. The compiler sees this code after macro replacement: if(GetSomething()) error = 0;; else


92

The injected class name means that X is declared as a member of X, so that name lookup inside X always finds the current class, not another X that might be declared at the same enclosing scope, e.g. void X() { } class X { public: static X create() { return X(); } }; Is the create() function creating a temporary X object or calling the function X? At ...



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