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10

std::bind is going to make a copy of the std::string argument and pass that to the lambda. But that fails to compile because the lambda requires an rvalue argument, while what bind passes it will be an lvalue. You could get this to work if you get bind to move the argument, but this requires extremely ugly casting for disambiguation (because std::move is an ...


10

Aggregate-initialization requires your type to be an aggregate. An aggregate cannot have base classes: An aggregate is an array or a class (Clause 9) with no user-provided constructors (12.1), no private or protected non-static data members (Clause 11), no base classes (Clause 10), and no virtual functions (10.3).


7

If you take a std::function<int(int,int)> it will have overhead, but it will do what you want. It will even overload correctly in C++14. If you do not want type erasure and allocation overhead of std::function you can do this: template< class F, class R=std::result_of_t<F&(int,int)>, ...


7

In C++11, the code is well-defined, but may not do what you expect. The exact effects are, as per 21.4.5/2: Returns: *(begin() + pos) if pos < size(), otherwise a reference to an object of type T with value charT(); the referenced value shall not be modified. So if the string is non-empty, it returns a reference to the internal buffer's start. If ...


6

The most well-defined set of rules would come directly from the standard. Here are the relevant entries from standard draft N4296: Trivially-copyable types are defined in [basic.types]/9 Cv-unqualified scalar types, trivially copyable class types, arrays of such types, and nonvolatile const-qualified versions of these types are collectively called ...


5

To avoid memory leaks, you need to both: join a running thread, and make sure it is destructed/deleted (let it go out of scope for stack-allocated std::threads or explicitly call delete for std::thread*). See thread::~thread in cppreference: A thread object does not have an associated thread (and is safe to destroy) after: it was ...


4

If you consider this statement in [dcl.constexpr]/7: A call to a constexpr function produces the same result as a call to an equivalent non-constexpr function in all respects except that a call to a constexpr function can appear in a constant expression. Consider the non-constexpr equivalent function A::one(). _data[a] cannot be used in a constant ...


4

I've read that std::async internally uses std::bind, so how does it get away with rvalue reference parameters when std::bind does not? It doesn't use bind internally. (Or rather, it couldn't without going through some epic contortions like the one in @Praetorian's answer in that question, and it's much easier to just write something separately). It ...


4

You can prevent the use of 0 at compile time, using templates. template <int N> double computeNthDerivative(double x) { // Disallow its usage for 0 by using static_assert. static_assert(N != 0, "Using 0 is not allowed"); // Implement the logic for non-zero N } To prevent the use of the function for 0 at run time, it's best to throw an ...


3

The std::string class copies the string, not the pointer to the string. That means that the memory allocated by strdup will be lost forever for your process. There's simply no need to use strdup in that way. And besides that, string literals will exist for the life-time of the program, so pointers to them will never become invalid.


3

The type of an expression is a compile-time property. The value of the first operand in a conditional expression (and hence the branch selected), is, in general, a run-time thing, so it can't possibly affect the expression's type. Instead, a complicated set of rules (more than a page of standardese, most of which I quoted in this answer) is used to ...


3

Yes you have to call join before destroying the thread object. If the destructor for a std::thread object that is joinable (i.e. if joinable returns true) is called, it will call std::terminate. Therefore, you have to call join before destroying the thread, whether by calling delete when on the heap or by it being destroyed normally. To prevent a memory ...


3

There's no right answer, but returning by value is safer. I have read several questions on SO relating to returning rvalue references, and have come to the conclusion that this is bad practice. Returning a reference to a parameter foists a contract upon the caller that either The parameter cannot be a temporary (which is just what rvalue references ...


2

The first version allows to do further operations on the returned object in one line as in (refobj = a).do_something(); When you don't return a reference to the object, this is not possible. You may think this is silly, but think about output operators. void operator<<(std::ostream &out, const Obj1 &obj1); std::ostream& ...


2

Here are my suggestions: Best solution really is to store the data in a database. There is not much point in implementing your own database when companies have been doing this far the past few decades. Just use one of them. You can use MySQL's MEMORY engine if you really want the data to be completely loaded in memory: ...


2

you may try boost::multi_index_container. Here is an example And there are many other examples, you can check them also. I just kown of these stuff, and hope it helps.


2

This is an interesting problem, and as usual you'll have to compromise speed and space. Your solution is pretty bad at both, since using a map your memory will be really fragmented with so much data, and lookups will be on the logarithmic range, which is not optimal. You could try: struct Value{ std::vector<int> _values; } ...


1

std::shared_ptr supports semantic of raw pointers. And all raw pointers can be converted to void*. So to create a map containing shared_ptr of any type you should use the following: std::map<std::string, std::shared_ptr<void>>


1

There are two alternatives, the type-erasing std::function<signature> forces a particular signature which goes along the lines of your question, but it imposes some additional cost (mainly it cannot be inlined in general). The alternative is to use a template an leave the last argument as a generic object. This approach can be better from a ...


1

I think the best way here is to throw an exception. This is what exceptions are for, even the name seems to suggest this. As to the assert macro, there is one important caveat. If you use the assert macro, the program will abort if the assertion is not met. However, if you ever make a release build where the NDEBUG macro is set, all assertions will be ...


1

Strings are ordered lexicographically. Each character in the first string is compared to the equivalent character in the second string until there are two characters that don't match one another or until one string ends. For example the following statements are true: "aaab" < "aaac" // because 'b'<'c' "aaa" < "aaab" // by convention shorter string ...


1

constexpr functions are made so that they can be called both at compile-time and run-time. Code with a constexpr function is well-formed if you can omit constexpr and get a proper plain function. In other words it must compile as a run-time function. If the body of constexpr function cannot be calculated at compile-time, it's still compiled, but you cannot ...


1

The issue is that libc++ is not entirely C++11 compliant with the integral overload for std::abs in cmath: double fabs( Integral arg ); (7) (since C++11) Including cstdlib solves your problem since that header has overloads specifically for integer types. For reference the draft C++11 standard section 26.8 [c.math] paragraph 11 says: Moreover, ...


1

Garbage Collection Can Make Leaks Your Worst Nightmare Full-fledged GC that handles things like cyclic references would be somewhat of an upgrade over a ref-counted shared_ptr. I would somewhat welcome it in C++, but not at the language level. One of the beauties about C++ is that it doesn't force garbage collection on you. I want to correct a common ...



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