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24

Sure, use decltype: auto var_a = bar(t); decltype(var_a) b; You can add cv-qualifiers and references to decltype specifiers as if it were any other type: const decltype(var_a)* b;


14

decltype(var_a) var_b; And a Lorem Ipsum to reach the required minimum of 30 characters per answer.


10

another approach could be to have a check in bar to test if the type is in the sequence, else barf with a useful error message, this avoid any inheritance tricks.. #include <iostream> struct E {}; struct F {}; template <class... As> class Foo { template <typename U> static constexpr bool contains() { return false; } ...


9

In case you don't actually need the bars and instead just need to constrain foo - we can use SFINAE to allow a call to it only with a type convertible to one of the As: template <class... As> class Foo { public: template <class T, class = std::enable_if_t<any<std::is_convertible<T, As>::value...>::value>> void ...


7

Despite the nice answer of @TartanLlama, this is another way one can use decltype to name actually the given type: int f() { return 42; } void g() { // Give the type a name... using my_type = decltype(f()); // ... then use it as already showed up my_type var_a = f(); my_type var_b = var_a; const my_type &var_c = var_b; } int ...


6

template <class CRTP, class A, class... As> struct FooBar { void bar(const A& a) { static_cast<CRTP*>(this)->foo(a); } }; template <class CRTP, class A, class B, class... As> struct FooBar<CRTP, A, B, As...> : FooBar<CRTP, B, As...> { using FooBar<CRTP, B, As...>::bar; void bar(const ...


6

Just give the private function a different name: class Foo { private: template <typename T> void foo(const T &); public: void operator()(const A & x) { foo(x); } void operator()(const B & x) { foo(x); } };


6

#include <unordered_map> #include <utility> #include <tuple> #include <cstddef> template <typename... Tkeys> class C { public: std::tuple<std::unordered_map<Tkeys, int>... > maps; template <typename... Args> void foo(Args&&... keys) { ...


5

template <class A, class... As> class Foo : public Foo<As...> { protected: using Foo<As...>::foo; public: using Foo<As...>::bar; void bar(const A& a) { foo(a); } }; template <class A> class Foo<A> { protected: template <class T> void foo(const T& t) { } public: void bar(const A& ...


5

It's called emplace(): std::map<std::string, std::string> m; // uses pair's template constructor m.emplace("d", "ddd");


3

In the first part of your destructor you're deleting all the list items starting from head. In the second part of the destructor you're attempting to delete last list item again by using its pointer kept in tail but it's already deleted in the first part.


3

When I need to replace one of those elements with a new shared_ptr I want the old shared_ptr to go out of scope. Will regular element assignment achieve this? The shared pointer in the vector won't go out of scope, but it will replace the managed object with the new one given. Calling: things.at(0) = new_shared_ptr; will preserve the count ...


3

In your second loop, you draw the borders but you forgot to draw the inside of your rectangle. Add this to the if: else { cout << " "; } As πάντα ῥεῖ pointed out, you also forgot to use endl after the firt and last loops. Live Demo


3

In ancient times before c++11 arrived people dealt with it using pure templates. template <class Bar> void foo_impl(Bar var_a) { Bar var_b; //var_b is of the same type as var_a } template <class T> void foo(T t) { foo_impl(bar(t)); } F_1 bar(T_1 t) { } F_2 bar(T_2 t) { }


2

If you can look into documentation of jsoncpp Value class (I assume rootL1 is of this type, and operator[] returns the same type), you will see that there is no unsigned char* conversion constructor which would accept your userInfo->hashCred array. There is one constructor which accepts const char* but there is no implicit conversion from unsigned char* ...


2

If you have a compiler that supports C++17 fold expressions then you could have the following simple variadic expansion scheme: template<typename... Tkeys> class C { template<typename... Args, std::size_t... I> void foo_helper(std::index_sequence<I...>, Args&& ...args) { ...


2

In short: As you have different functions used to allocate memory, you'll need to call their counterpart deallocation functions accordingly: malloc(), calloc() and realloc() need to be deallocated with a call to free() X* x = new X(); needs to be deallocated with delete x; X** x = new X[10]; needs to be deallocated with delete[] x; The idiomatic way ...


2

In C++17, you can use: map_int.try_emplace(key, val); This actually returns some useful information: std::pair<std::map<obj1, obj2>::iterator, bool> p = map_int.try_emplace(key, val); p.first is an iterator that points to the element with the given key. p.second indicates whether the insertion took place. You can achieve a similar effect ...


2

Yes, basically you are right. To be more accurate, the reference count of previous shared_ptr at(0) will be decremented. And then you assign it with a new shared_ptr, which may have the count 1. Looks like the reference count at(0) is the same, but it changed and changed back. You can verify it by std::shared_ptr::use_cout() For more details, we can debug ...


2

You could delegate one constructor to the other: struct A { A(const std::vector<int> & v) : A(std::vector<int>(v)) {} A(std::vector<int> && v) : v_(std::move(v)) { // logic } // ... }; The moving constructor is now as fast as it can be, and the copying constructor costs one more move than if ...


1

To avoid copy when make_pair, why not define the pair as std::pair<Obj&, Obj&> directly? #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <functional> class Obj { }; bool foo(const std::pair<Obj, Obj>& A_and_B) { // do some computation on A & B std::cout << __func__ << std::endl; } bool ...


1

Unless I were feeling seriously masochistic, I'd do the job a bit differently. My immediate reaction would be to write code more on this general order: std::string h_border = std::string(width, '*' ) + "\n"; std::string v_border = "*" + std::string(width - 2, ' ') +"*\n"; std::cout << h_border; for (int i = 0; i < height - 2; i++) std::cout ...


1

int** b = (int**)calloc(sizeof(int*) * rows, sizeof(int*)); This is not correct, the first parameter of calloc is "number of elements to allocate". should be int** b = (int**)calloc(rows, sizeof(int*)); /* No need to cast in C */ What is the safe way for creating multidimensional arrays in C and C++ for such scenarios? In C (in order to avoid ...



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