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29

From: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/initializer_list The underlying array is not guaranteed to exist after the lifetime of the original initializer list object has ended. The storage for std::initializer_list is unspecified (i.e. it could be automatic, temporary, or static read-only memory, depending on the situation). I don't think the ...


25

There's a trick here you're overlooking, namely that std::move(cat) doesn't actually move anything. It merely tells the compiler to try to move. However, since your class has no constructor that accepts a const CAT&&, it will instead use the implicit const CAT& copy constructor, and safely copy. No danger, no trap. If the copy constructor is ...


21

It will be clear that struct text_descriptor td[3] = { {0, {465,223}, 123}, {1, {465,262}, 123}, }; is list-initialisation, and that the initialiser list is not empty. C++11 says ([dcl.init.list]p3): List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows: If the initializer list has no elements and T is a ...


19

The rationale goes back quite a ways, and is not well documented. is_base_of was originally called is_base_and_derived, and was introduced in TR1. Dave Abrahams introduced an issue against this class in N1541, number 3.13: Currently, is_base_and_derived<X,Y> returns false when X and Y are the same. This is technically correct (X isn’t its own ...


18

std::map is unique-key. 1, 3, 5 all yield true when converted to bool.


17

Assume that the order of elements does not matter. This is what you need to pay attention to. Suppose you have a vector 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 and you want to remove the 3. You can turn this into 0 1 2 6 4 5 in O(1) without any issues.


16

Somebody 30 years ago who wrote the library from which std::string was imported thought it was a good idea. Before standardization it was not removed. Since then, removing it would risk breaking legacy code, which is a cost. The deprecated attribute was only added recently to C++, which allows a standard way to tell the user of a function that it will go ...


16

Foo foo{x}; // 1 Foo foo = {x}; // 2 1 is direct-list-initialization. 2 is copy-list-initialization. Assuming that Foo is a class type, then in most cases they do exactly the same thing, conceptually or otherwise, except that if an explicit constructor is selected during overload resolution, then #2 is ill-formed. In particular, unlike ...


16

Are constexpr references ever useful? (i.e., "better" than const references) They are guaranteed to be initiailized before the program starts, whereas a reference to const can be initialized during dynamic initialization, after the program starts running. If yes, how can I effectively define them? A constexpr reference has to bind to ...


16

If the ownership of the managed object is not being transferred (and because it's a unique_ptr, ownership cannot be shared) then it's more correct to separate the logic in the called function from the concept of ownership. We do this by calling by reference. This is a convoluted way of saying: Given: std::unique_ptr<Thing> thing_ptr; to change the ...


16

A lambda can only be converted to a function pointer if it does not capture, from the draft C++11 standard section 5.1.2 [expr.prim.lambda] says (emphasis mine): The closure type for a lambda-expression with no lambda-capture has a public non-virtual non-explicit const conversion function to pointer to function having the same parameter and return ...


16

Introduction This question really boils down to whether the use of the less-than relational operator on pointer types where one operand is a nullptr will yield the "expected" result; which sadly isn't the case. The result is unspecified. Note: Do mind that std::less guarantees a total order; meaning that even if the result, when using the function ...


15

TL;DR: The current state of this question is unclear and no definite answer can be given. While IMHO your example is well-defined, this cannot be a matter of opinion. The modus vivendi seems to be that it invokes UB, but in any case, there is no need to refer to e.g. a via a null pointer - just use demo::a and avoid this subject altogether. There is a lot ...


13

The problem is that you are referencing an object that no longer exists and therefore you are invoking undefined behavior. initializer_list seems underspecified in the C++11 draft standard, there are no normative sections that actually specify this behavior. Although there are plenty of notes that indicate this will not work and in general although notes are ...


13

As the comments correctly note, you can get compiling by dropping the const in the return type of your SerializableFormat conversion operator: operator const SerializableFormat() const As to whether clang is correct in this behavior is a matter of some dispute. The issue is being tracked by clang bug report 16682. At this time there is talk of creating a ...


13

Shafik Yaghmour's answer correctly explains why the lambda cannot be passed as a function pointer. I'd like to show two simple fixes for the problem. Use std::function instead of raw function pointers. This is a very clean solution. Note however that it includes some additional overhead for the type erasure (probably a virtual function call). #include ...


13

In both cases, the value is unspecified, but behaviour is well-defined. Function calls are indeterminately sequenced with respect to other evaluations in the expression that calls them, as specified in [intro.exececution] 1.9/15: Every evaluation in the calling function (including other function calls) that is not otherwise specifically sequenced before ...


12

C++ Standard defines current_exception() in section § 18.8.5 [propagation] : (emphasis mine) exception_ptr current_exception() noexcept; Returns: An exception_ptr object that refers to the currently handled exception (15.3) or a copy of the currently handled exception, or a null exception_ptr object if no exception is being handled. The ...


12

There is no standard way to disable optimisations, so if you need to disable optimisations, you're limited to whatever your implementation happens to provide. It doesn't make sense to compare the two approaches unless you find a compiler that supports them both. Anyway, in GCC, asm volatile("" : "+r" (datum)); means that unverified assembly code supplied ...


12

This an effect of the maximal munch principle, which has the lexical analyzer take as many characters as possible to form a valid token. This is covered in draft C++ standard section 2.5 [lex.pptoken] which says: Otherwise, the next preprocessing token is the longest sequence of characters that could constitute a preprocessing token, even if that ...


12

It's not that clock is considered bad, necessarily, so much as it's not defined to operate the way people often think it is. Namely, it's not specified to produce wall-clock, or 'real', time. clock() is defined to tell you how much CPU time is used; using more threads uses more CPU time, sleeping threads use less time. Secondly, not all platforms implement ...


12

Use std::decay_t. This is the conversion that is applied when you pass an argument to a function by value.


12

Is bar an rvalue or an lvalue? The question answers itself. Whatever has a name is an lvalue(1). So bar is an lvalue. Its type is "rvalue reference to string", but it's an lvalue of that type. If you want to treat it as an rvalue, you need to apply std::move() to it. If you can perform any operation on an rvalue reference that you can on an ...


11

Short answer: no, the address of the moved from object doesn't change. But the old object may not be a useful state. When you perform a move construction you are creating a new object and moving the contents of another object into the new object. The new object will always be constructed in a different memory location from the old object. Something ...


11

The behaviour of the program depends on the language standard mode of gcc: There is a gcc extension for a built-in literal suffix i that produces C99 complex numbers. Those are distinct built-in types like _Complex double, as opposed to the "user-defined" class (template specialization) std::complex<double> used in C++. In C++14, C++ now has a ...


11

The bullet is X is a union-like class that has a variant member with a non-trivial default constructor which is parsed as X is a union-like class that has (a variant member with a non-trivial default constructor) i.e., "with a non-trivial default constructor" applies to the type of the variant member, not X.


11

By providing a first argument to async, you can configure it to run deferred (std::launch::deferred), to run in its own thread (std::launch::async), or let the system decide between both options (std::launch::async | std::launch::deferred). The latter is the default behavior. So, to force it to run in another thread, adapt your call of std::async to ...


10

What would the best return type be for the factory function? unique_ptr would be best. It prevents accidental leaks, and the user can release ownership from the pointer, or transfer ownership to a shared_ptr (which has a constructor for that very purpose), if they want to use a different ownership scheme. What is the best parameter type for the ...


10

For getting the compiler to show me the type of something, I usually use an improptu class like this: template <class T> struct show_type; Then, in the code where you need to learn a type, you'd do this: show_type<decltype(room)> t; Compile this, and the compiler will rightfully complain that show_type<T> is not defined; but the error ...


10

Actually, there is a way to do it. Here is the pseudocode: If the element you are trying to remove is the last element in the vector, remove it, done. Read the last element of the vector and write it over the element-to-be-removed. Remove the last element of the vector.



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