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93

Algorithmic building blocks We begin by assembling the algorithmic building blocks from the Standard Library: #include <algorithm> // min_element, iter_swap, // upper_bound, rotate, // nth_element, partition, // inplace_merge, // make_heap, ...


47

std::string is not a null terminated string. If you want to empty it use the clear() method. If you want to remove an element of the string use the erase() method.


36

Nobody forces you to write anything, so nobody forces you to write code that invokes UB. As for the standard library, its code is free to contain any nonportable behavior it wants - heck, it may even be written in another language with the compiler creating the bindings via magical unicorns; all that matters is that it behaves according to specification. ...


31

The general rule of thumb for passing by value is when you would end up making a copy anyway. That is to say that rather than doing this: void f(const std::vector<int>& x) { std::vector<int> y(x); // stuff } where you first pass a const-ref and then copy it, you should do this instead: void f(std::vector<int> x) { // ...


29

There are two approaches to strings. In C, strings are zero-terminated, meaning the '\0' indicates the end of the string, which is what you are expected. C++ (and most languages) uses counted strings, meaning the end of the string is indexed, so adding null terminators to the string won't terminate it. '\0' is a non-printing character, so when you print, ...


25

GCC is likely memoizing constexpr functions (enabling a Θ(n) computation of fib(n)). That is safe for the compiler to do because constexpr functions are purely functional. Compare the Θ(n) "compiler algorithm" (using memoization) to your Θ(φn) run time algorithm (where φ is the golden ratio) and suddenly it makes perfect sense that the compiler is so much ...


23

First of all, look at the template parameters: template <int ... N>. Even though a variable number of template arguments can be given to f, all of them must be of type int. Now when you use f<t1, t2, ..., tn>, the parameter unpacking (7 + N...) will follow the pattern 7 + N and expand to 7 + t1, 7 + t2, 7 + t3, ..., 7 + tn Therefore you end ...


20

With C++14 function return type deduction, that should work. In C++11, you could define another lambda (which can deduce the return type), rather than a function (which can't): auto makeLambda = [](double ratio) { return [=](double value) {return value * ratio;}; }; As noted in the comments, this could be further wrapped, if you particularly want a ...


19

how do you detect how much RAM the computer has, or how much RAM the process is using, or how much disk space is available to write to in a certain directory, or how much L2 cache is available? You don't. Precisely none of this is the purview of the C++ language, which describes an abstract machine. The only reason it tells you the number of cores ...


18

Use std::random_device to generate the seed. It'll provide non-deterministic random numbers, provided your implementation supports it. Otherwise it's allowed to use some other random number engine. std::mt19937_64 prng; seed = std::random_device{}(); prng.seed(seed); operator() of std::random_device returns an unsigned int, so if your platform has 32-bit ...


18

According to the standard § 23.3.6.1 Class template vector overview [vector.overview] : The elements of a vector are stored contiguously, meaning that if v is a vector<T, Allocator> where T is some type other than bool, then it obeys the identity &v[n] == &v[0] + n for all 0 <= n < v.size(). As far as it concerns your second ...


18

I understand why you are using std::function: You have to know the return type of the transformation to create the vector, right? But consider a completely different approach. Given the metafunction std::result_of you could compute the result type of a function call, so just write: template<typename F , typename CONTAINER , typename T = typename ...


17

Why the first one always returns true? Lambdas decay into function pointers, which are implicitly convertible to booleans (always true for lambdas because the pointer is never null). Why second fails to compile? Lambdas that capture anything do not have this conversion to a function pointer (how would that state get through?) If you must use a ...


17

Well, even if your compiler is C++14-compliant, your standard library isn't :) C++11 has: explicit forward_list( const Allocator& alloc = Allocator() ); whereas C++14 has (since library DR2193): forward_list() : forward_list( Allocator() ) {} explicit forward_list( const Allocator& alloc ); If you change A's default constructor to explicit ...


17

This is a known bug. The compiler will accept the code if you use a trailing return type instead. struct C { std::vector<int> v; auto begin() -> decltype(v.begin()) { return v.begin(); } auto end() -> decltype(v.end()) { return v.end(); } }; As the bug report says, another work around is by using: struct C { ...


16

You are not alone with this problem. Which is why not too long ago isocpp.org was created which, among other things, answers precisely this question. Quoting from the site: Where To Get the Current Standard Purchase the official standard (US$30). You can purchase the official standard for US$30 at the ANSI Store. (Note: The standard at that ...


16

From the standard Ch. 12 - Special member functions Par 12.8 Copying and moving class objects (emphasis mine) 9 . If the definition of a class X does not explicitly declare a move constructor, one will be implicitly declared as defaulted if and only if — X does not have a user-declared copy constructor, — X does not have a user-declared copy ...


16

There is no need for variadics, a recursive typedef is sufficient to generate those types at compile time. How is is implemented ? 1) Provide a template with 2 arguments : the vector elements type (T), and the desired dimension of the structure (size_t N). Declare a typedef type : it will be based on the declaration of type for the template instantiated ...


16

Because taking a vector A and copying it to vector B does not guarantee that vector B will have the same capacity as vector A. Typically, the new vector will allocate only enough memory to hold the elements being copied into it. In fact, there's an old trick that makes use of this, called the reduce-capacity trick: int main() { vector<int> v { ...


15

Use an extra template parameter with a default value to distinguish cases: template <int N, bool b = N <= 10> class Foo; template <int N> class Foo<N, true> { ... // implementation for N <= 10 }; template <int N> class Foo<N, false> { ... // implementation for N > 10 };


14

Introduction std::placeholders::_* works by perfectly-forwarding the types which later takes their place. This mean that since you are passing a and b (which are lvalues) to greversed these lvalues will be forwarded to g, exactly like they are. This behavior is explained in section [func.bind.bind]p10 of the Standard (n3337), but a more easy to ...


14

The officially finalized standard isn't free. You can buy it from your national standardization organization. You can probably buy it for relatively few dollars from ANSI. The open-std web site is used for the internal standardization work. The papers published there can be very close or even identical to the standard document but they are not the official ...


13

array::assign() is a Visual Studio extension. You are compiling with g++. Check here standard g++ array


13

It's perfectly valid and works just fine. The only issue to concern is that it is new. It may confuse or surprise readers of your code who are only familiar with C++98. But it works, so feel free to write your main this way if you feel like it.


13

make_foo is in the same ballpark as "right", but foo isn't. The foo constructor currently only accepts a non-deduced T &&, and forwarding there is probably not what you mean (but see @nosid's comment). All in all, foo should take a type parameter, have a templated constructor, and the maker function should do the decaying: template <typename ...


13

"std::thread::hardware_concurrency() gives you the number of threads the machine supports ..." No, it doesn't. To be precise (citing from here) std::thread::hardware_concurrency() ... Returns number of concurrent threads supported by the implementation. The value should be considered only a hint. ... ... If the value is not well defined or not ...


13

Minimized example: class A { }; class B : public A { }; class C : public A { }; int main() { B b; C c; A& refA = true? b : c; } Clang reports: main.cpp:13:19: error: incompatible operand types ('B' and 'C') A& refA = true? b : c; The relevant rule is found in §5.16/p3-6 of the standard: 3 Otherwise, if the second and third ...


12

The problem is that {1, 1} is not an expression and has no type. Since it has no type, it cannot be deduced into the template argument list. Neither of them are correct, because the issue has nothing to do with the number of arguments provided.


12

If you can use uint64_t you should also be able to use uintmax_t.


12

You just think you got testing esting as output, but you actually got testing esting ^ | +-- "empty" \0 char because the std::string still has the length of "testing", you just replaced the first character 't' with '\0'. When std::cout gets the string, it looks at the string length and outputs all its characters, which makes the '\0' cause an "empty" ...



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