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18

C++11 draft n3290 has this to say about the parameters that user-defined literals can take (§13.5.8): The declaration of a literal operator shall have a parameter-declaration-clause equivalent to one of the following: const char* unsigned long long int long double char wchar_t char16_t char32_t const char*, std::size_t const wchar_t*, std::size_t const ...


18

The main speed problem lies with your is_prime implementation. First of all, you filter a Stream to find all divisors, and then check if there were none (l.size == 0). But it's faster to return false as soon as the first divisor is found: def is_prime(a: Int): Boolean = Stream.range(3, a, 2).find(a % _ == 0).isEmpty This decreased runtime from 22 ...


16

[basic.link]/p7, emphasis mine: When a block scope declaration of an entity with linkage is not found to refer to some other declaration, then that entity is a member of the innermost enclosing namespace. However such a declaration does not introduce the member name in its namespace scope. [namespace.memdef]/p2, emphasis mine: Members of a ...


14

I would suggest that instead of maintaining and returning an un-unique_ptred vector, you provide functions to access the elements directly. This encapsulates the storage of your resources; clients don't know that they are stored as unique_ptrs, nor that they are kept in a vector. One possibility for this is to use boost::indirect_iterator to dereference ...


14

Whether it's legal or not is implementation-specific (and identifier-specific). When the Standard gives the implementation the sole right to use these names, that includes the right to make the names available in user code. If an implementation does so, great. But if an implementation doesn't expressly give you the right, it is clear from "shall not be ...


14

The important part is "reserved to the implementation". It means that the compiler vendor may use those names and even document them. Your code may then use those names as documented. This is often used for extensions like __builtin_expect, where the compiler vendor avoids any clash with your identifiers (that are declared by your code) by using those ...


14

You're asking "how do I do X, without using any of the tools the language provides to do X". It's silly. And the answer's no. It's not possible.


13

gcc and clang have very similar code generation as they are largely ABI compatible with one another. I only have clang to answer your question with, but my answer should apply to your gcc compiler fairly closely. One can disassemble throw_func, noexcept_func and std_func using the -S command line flag. Upon doing so, you will note that the three functions ...


13

This is because std::cout is defined in the following way (in the <iostream> header): #include <ios> #include <streambuf> #include <istream> #include <ostream> namespace std { extern istream cin; extern ostream cout; extern ostream cerr; extern ostream clog; extern wistream wcin; extern wostream wcout; extern ...


12

GCC is wrong here. All references are to N4431, the latest C++ WD. [tl;dr: There's a difference between a function being inline (or more precisely, being an inline function, as defined in 7.1.2/2) and being declared with the inline specifier. The constexpr specifier makes a function inline, but isn't an inline specifier.] Specifiers are described in ...


9

How can I create a std::vector of type A and give an argument to A's constructor? std::vector<A> v1(10, 42); // 10 elements each with value 42 std::vector<A> v2{1,2,3,4}; // 4 elements with different values How would I add 3 to the vector? v.emplace_back(3); // works with any suitable constructor v.push_back(3); ...


9

Your program does induce UB. §9.3.1/2: If a non-static member function of a class X is called for an object that is not of type X, or of a type derived from X, the behavior is undefined. A is not of type B or a type derived from B.


7

Interesting question! The problem you're running into is that unqualified name lookup will look in the scopes of where it is used (in increasing order of generality). But, from [basic.scope.pdecl]: The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator (Clause 8) and before its initializer (if any) and in this function: ...


7

Just write a function to clamp: double clamp(double val, double left = 0.0, double right = 1.0) { return std::min(std::max(val, left), right); } And use that in your constructor: Color(double x) : r{clamp(x)} , g{clamp(x)} , b{clamp(x)} { }


7

You could, and should, use function template std::make_shared: auto p = std::make_shared<CPoint>(x, y); auto pA = std::make_shared<ClassA>(); // a shared_ptr to new ClassA() auto pB = std::make_shared<ClassB>(a, b, c); // a shared_ptr to new ClassB(a, b, c) To give it a different name, you can use a simple wrapper function: template< ...


7

Your original case relied upon aggregate initialization [dcl.init.list]: List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows: ... — Otherwise, if T is an aggregate, aggregate initialization is performed Where an aggregate and aggregate initialiazation are, from [dcl.init.aggr], emphasis mine: An aggregate is an array ...


7

A move constructor is executed only when you construct an object. A move assignment operator is executed on a previously constructed object. It is exactly the same scenario as in the copy case. Foo foo = std::move(bar); // construction, invokes move constructor foo = std::move(other); // assignment, invokes move assignment operator If you don't declare ...


6

There is a core language change in C++14 that allows the implementation to merge memory allocations, see N3664. If your compiler/optimizer takes advantage of this allowance, you may see a performance improvement.


6

Checking whether this types are supported is a platform-dependent thing, I think. For example, GCC defines: __CHAR16_TYPE__ and __CHAR32_TYPE__ if these types are provided (requires either ISO C11 or C++ 11 support). However, you cannot check for their presence directly, because they are fundamental types, not macros: In C++, char16_t and char32_t are ...


6

There is a proposal for C++1z that implements new type deduction rules for brace initialization (N3922), and I guess gcc implemented them: For direct list-initialization: 1. For a braced-init-list with only a single element, auto deduction will deduce from that entry; 2. For a braced-init-list with more than one element, auto deduction will be ...


5

Updated, thanks to @T.C. Wrapper's ctor is a template user-defined conversion, hence the non-template standard conversion sequence overload with Base& takes precedence. The access check is only performed after selecting the overload - which is too late in your case. The complete rules are complicated, more can be found here, look at the section "Best ...


5

The use of macros like DEFER, and complicated C macrology in general, depends on understanding how the C preprocessor actually expands macro expressions. It doesn't just attempt to reduce all expression trees the way a conventional programming language does, but rather, it works on a linear token stream, and has an implicit "cursor" at the point where it's ...


5

There might be difference in contexts involving std::initializer_list<>, e.g.: Case 1 - () and {} #include <initializer_list> #include <iostream> using namespace std; struct Test2 { Test2(initializer_list<int> l) {} }; int main() { Test2* test3 = new Test2(); // compile error: no default ctor Test2* test4 = new ...


5

Lifetime extension only occurs when binding directly to references outside of a constructor. Reference lifetime extension within a constructor would be technically challenging for compilers to implement. If you want reference lifetime extension, you will be forced to make a copy of it. The usual way is: struct wrap { wrap(A&& a) : ...


5

The first fails because std::make_pair seems to strip the const specifier from the variables, which in turn doesn't match with the signature of the second operator<<: std::pair<T const, T const> That is correct. make_pair is a function template that relies on std::decay to explicitly drop const, volatile, and & qualifiers: template ...


5

You, can can use min and max, ideally combining them into a clamp function: template <class T> T clamp(T val, T min, T max) { return std::min(max, std::max(min, val)); } struct Color { Color(double x) : r{clamp(x, 0., 1.)}, g{clamp(x, 0., 1.)}, b{clamp(x, 0., 1.)} {} };


5

Value-initialization for an array will value-initialize each element in the array. You have an array of arrays, so each element (an array) will be value-initialized. From there, return to the first sentence of this answer for what happens to each array. The answer to your second question, regular enumerations are scalars, and as such are value-initialized, ...


5

the call tree : WriteLog("apple, ", "orange, ", "mango"); ->WriteLog("apple, "); -> std::wcout << "apple, "; ->WriteLog( "orange, ", "mango"); ->WriteLog("orange, "); -> std::wcout << "orange, "; ->WriteLog( "mango"); -> std::wcout << ...


5

Yes, it is valid. You can have multiple (plain) pointers pointing to the same object. The question is how long those pointers are valid or when the object pointed to is deleted. A unique_ptr stores one more plain pointer and takes ownership, meaning it is responsible for when the object is destroyed. Moving it to another unique_ptr just transfers ...


5

The constructor in question is an explicit constructor. You need to explicitly invoke it for this to compile: std::pair<int, std::packaged_task<int(void)>> pair(15, std::packaged_task<int(void)>{ []() -> int { return 15; } }); Or, better yet, use std::make_pair: auto pair = std::make_pair(15, ...



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