Hot answers tagged

59

The lambda in question actually has no state. Examine: struct lambda { auto operator()() const { return 17; } }; And if we had lambda f;, it is an empty class. Not only is the above lambda functionally similar to your lambda, it is (basically) how your lambda is implemented! (It also needs an implicit cast to function pointer operator, and the name ...


35

Sure, use decltype: auto var_a = bar(t); decltype(var_a) b; You can add cv-qualifiers and references to decltype specifiers as if it were any other type: const decltype(var_a)* b;


35

A lambda is not a function pointer. A lambda is an instance of a class. Your code is approximately equivalent to: class f_lambda { public: auto operator() { return 17; } }; f_lambda f; std::cout << f() << std::endl; std::cout << &f << std::endl; std::cout << sizeof(f) << std::endl; The internal class that ...


32

register In C, the register storage class was used as a hint to the compiler, to express that a variable should be preferentially stored in a register. Note that the hint to store a register variable in an actual register may or may not be honored, but in either case the relevant restrictions still apply. See C11, 6.7.1p6 (emphasis mine): A declaration ...


24

Your compiler more or less translates the lambda to the following struct type: struct _SomeInternalName { int operator()() { return 17; } }; int main() { _SomeInternalName f; std::cout << f() << std::endl; } Since that struct has no non-static members, it has the same size as an empty struct, which is 1. That changes as soon as ...


16

decltype(var_a) var_b; And a Lorem Ipsum to reach the required minimum of 30 characters per answer.


14

The proposal itself explains why: to allow overloading with the underlying types of uint_least16_t and uint_least32_t. If they were typedefed this wouldn't be possible. Define char16_t to be a distinct new type, that has the same size and representation as uint_least16_t. Likewise, define char32_t to be a distinct new type, that has the same size and ...


13

register in C served two purposes: Hint to the compiler that the variable should be stored in a register for performance. This use is largely obsolete now. Prevent the programmer from using the variable in ways that would prevent it from being stored in a register. This use is only somewhat obsolete IMO. This is similar to const, which Hints to the ...


12

You need an extra argument for the specialization: template <class T, size_t N> struct array_element<T[N]> { using type = T; }; Alternatively: std::remove_reference<decltype(a[0])>::type element = a[0]; Or: auto element = a[0];


12

Use std::remove_extent template class (C++11) or std::remove_extent_t alias template (C++14) to get a type of an array element (both are declared in type_traits header file): std::remove_extent<decltype(a)>::type element0 = a[0]; std::remove_extent_t<decltype(a)> element1 = a[1]; Live demo You can also use std::remove_all_extents (C++11) or ...


12

Shouldn't the lambda be, at mimumum, a pointer to its implementation? Not necessarily. According to the standard, the size of the unique, unnamed class is implementation-defined. Excerpt from [expr.prim.lambda], C++14 (emphasis mine): The type of the lambda-expression (which is also the type of the closure object) is a unique, unnamed nonunion ...


11

Despite the nice answer of @TartanLlama, this is another way one can use decltype to name actually the given type: int f() { return 42; } void g() { // Give the type a name... using my_type = decltype(f()); // ... then use it as already showed up my_type var_a = f(); my_type var_b = var_a; const my_type &var_c = var_b; } int ...


11

another approach could be to have a check in bar to test if the type is in the sequence, else barf with a useful error message, this avoid any inheritance tricks.. #include <iostream> struct E {}; struct F {}; template <class... As> class Foo { template <typename U> static constexpr bool contains() { return false; } ...


11

Is final used for optimization in C++? It can be, and is. As noted, it is being used already; see here and here showing the generated code for the override with and without final. An optimisation along these lines would relate to the "de-virtualization" of the virtual calls. This is not always immediately affected by the final of the class nor ...


11

There are no reasons to return integer when function business logic does not demand it. The reasons not to do this are following: Clarity of intent. If you do not return a value, everybody knows function does not return a value. Callers do not need to puzzle themselves trying to understand what to do with return value of 0. Compilers do checks for you. If ...


11

Asking about performance implications as a result of expression of coding style is always the wrong question. The compiler, when optimising, considers expressed intent, not the layout of your code. This example is extreme but it's worth showing you the code produced by gcc with compiler option -O2. Refactoring the code above to remove the noise that will ...


10

Your code is absolutely legal and well-defined. Nothing prevents you from modifying elements of the sequence during iteration, and moving is just a form of modification. Just keep in mind to not try to use those pointers after the loop.


10

The following works for me. template <typename T> struct X { using value = T; }; template <typename T> struct Y { using value = T*; }; template <typename... Ts> void Func(typename Ts::value... ts) { } int main() { Func<X<int>, Y<double>>(10, nullptr); }


9

In case you don't actually need the bars and instead just need to constrain foo - we can use SFINAE to allow a call to it only with a type convertible to one of the As: template <class... As> class Foo { public: template <class T, class = std::enable_if_t<any<std::is_convertible<T, As>::value...>::value>> void ...


8

If you have to have an interface, then you should do what Kerrek suggested. But even better would be to change your interface from: class DataStore { void visitData(Visitor& visitor) { // bunch of calls to visitor.visit(...) ... } } to: template <class Visitor> void visitData(Visitor visitor) { // bunch of ...


8

If the array is of fixed size, and its elements don't change, there is no real need to use vector. You could use std::array, array of const or constexpr instead. constexpr float meanTimeAO[] = { 0.4437f, 0.441f, 0.44206f, 0.44632f, 0.4508f, 0.45425f,...}


8

This library uses what is known as an embedded Domain Specific Language, where it warps C++ and preprocessor syntax in ways that allow a seemingly different language to be just another part of a C++ program. In short, magic. The first bit of magic lies in: iod_define_symbol(hello) which is a macro that generates the identifier _hello of type _hello_t. ...


8

If you have a very bad hash, or pathological data, all of the elements can end up in one bucket, making it an O(n) traversal to locate/remove the element. It is perfectly legal to implement a std::unordered_map using a (singly-)linked-list for the elements: we can see that its iterator type is only required to fulfil the ForwardIterator concept. This makes ...


7

It's called emplace(): std::map<std::string, std::string> m; // uses pair's template constructor m.emplace("d", "ddd");


7

#include <unordered_map> #include <utility> #include <tuple> #include <cstddef> template <typename... Tkeys> class C { public: std::tuple<std::unordered_map<Tkeys, int>... > maps; template <typename... Args> void foo(Args&&... keys) { ...


7

It's not standard C++ syntax, it's framework specific instead. The elements prefixed with an underscore (_hello, _message etc) are used with a symbol definition generator that runs and creates the necessary definitions prior to compilation. There's some more information on it on the end of this page: http://siliconframework.org/docs/symbols.html. Qt does a ...


7

The problem with your logic is the belief that the reason why shared_ptr has a distinction between the managed pointer and the get pointer is because make_shared wasn't available. And therefore, if we forced everyone to use make_shared to create shared_ptr, we wouldn't need that distinction. This is incorrect. You can implement shared_ptr's pointer-based ...


7

C99 Rationale provides some more context of keyword register: Rationale for International Standard — Programming Languages — C §6.7.1 Storage-class specifiers Because the address of a register variable cannot be taken, objects of storage class register effectively exist in a space distinct from other objects. (Functions occupy yet a third ...


7

From http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/lambda: The lambda expression constructs an unnamed prvalue temporary object of unique unnamed non-union non-aggregate class type, known as closure type, which is declared (for the purposes of ADL) in the smallest block scope, class scope, or namespace scope that contains the lambda expression. If the ...


7

The problem is that bind() will eagerly evaluate nested bind expressions. So instead of ending up with some callable that returns bool (as you had intended from std::bind(&C::step1, this)), you just end up with bool. Instead, use lambdas: std::function<void(void) > f = [this]{ work([this]{ return step1(); }, [this]{ return step2(); ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible