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0

You can't do what you want to do, because decimal numbers are not representable exactly in floating point format. In otherwords, double can't precisely hold 3.14 exactly, it stores everything as fractions of powers of 2, so it stores it as something like 3 + 9175/65536 or thereabouts (do it on your calculator and you'll get 3.1399993896484375. (I realize ...


2

Since you posted code that shows #ifndef POLIGONO_HPP #define POLIGONO_HPP in Poligono.cpp, but you don't have the same in ListaEnc.hpp, I assume that you are missing include guards in that header? Depending on what other code is included in Poligono.cpp, this could result in the definition of template ListaEnc twice. Under C++ standard if you break the ...


0

There is no way for a program to KNOW how to format the numbers in the way that you are describing, unless you write some code to analyze the numbers in some way - and even that can be quite hard. What is required here is knowing the input format in your source code, and that's lost as soon as the compiler converts the decimal input source code into binary ...


-1

It finally forces people to stop using the horrible macro NULL for null pointers. Setting NULL to nullptr would break old code and allow for perpetuating the use of the ugly macro.


1

NULL is not type safe. For historical reason it was defined as 0 without casting, and the compiler silence warning of casting number to pointer on this special zero. For instant, you can do: void* p = 0; but not this without implicit casting: void* p = 1234; the side effect is that it can be abused as number values, as other answer mentioned. nullptr ...


4

nullptr is pointer type , while NULL have the tendency to be integer and sometimes in overload functions , you need to be clear that you are using a pointer and not an integer which nullptr comes in handy. Beside that, check this from Bjarne stroustrup website Should I use NULL or 0? In C++, the definition of NULL is 0, so there is only an ...


9

Stephanov Lavavej explained that once in a talk (55:35): While an implementation is allowed to #define NULL nullptr, it would break quite some uses like int i = NULL; and apparently there are plenty of those. So they could not force the change.


1

Without actually sitting in on the discussion in the standards committee, it's hard to say for sure, but I would think because it would break some code that uses NULL in a meaning where nullptr isn't sufficiently compatible. And breaking old code is never a good idea.


2

Your compilation command is erroneous. g++ -std=c++11 -O3 main.cpp -I/usr/include/eigen3 -L/usr/include/OpenANN \ -L/usr/lib -lutil -lboost_system -lboost_filesystem -lboost_iostreams -o Bot.out The link options that are -L and -l have two different roles: -L means to consider the directory when looking for libraries -l means to link with this ...


1

From the docs: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_59_0/libs/type_traits/doc/html/boost_typetraits/reference/function_traits.html ℹ Tip: function_traits is intended to introspect only C++ functions of the form R (), R( A1 ), R ( A1, ... etc. ) and not function pointers or class member functions. To convert a function pointer type to a suitable type use ...


4

C++ doesn't have any function type that directly or indirectly includes itself. You need some way to avoid the recursion in the type definition. One way of doing that is by not returning a function. Instead, return a struct containing a function. Self-contained example with function pointers: struct wrapper { wrapper (*function)(); }; wrapper f1(); ...


0

The point is that with capture, you can keep a state (just as a hand written class with operator() ) in a function-like object. @dau_sama gives a good answer. Here is another example: #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { const auto addSome = [](double some){ return [some](double val){ return some+val; } ; }; const auto ...


2

compiles or not, Do not return pointer or referene to a local variable! result will be destructed and de-allocated when GetAddonCmeterStringis finished, you are returning a memory address of an object that does not exist anymore! you should return the string by value*: string GetAddonCmeterString(string& sid) { ostringstream oss; oss ...


5

Are compilers able to...: Yes definitively! Can I rely on those optimizations?: No, you can't rely on any optimization. There may always be some strange conditions under which a compiler chooses not to implement a certain optimization for some non-obvious reason or just fails to see the possibility. Also in general, I've made the observation that compilers ...


1

It's possible for a compiler to detect this pattern and replace it by your proposal. However, neither clang++ nor g++ do this optimization, see for instance g++ 5.2.0's assembly output.


4

clang++ (3.5.2-1) seems to be smart enough -O3 (I'm not using c++11 or c++14, constexpr and noexcept removed from source): 08048760 <_Z3minii>: 8048760: 8b 44 24 08 mov 0x8(%esp),%eax 8048764: 8b 4c 24 04 mov 0x4(%esp),%ecx 8048768: 39 c1 cmp %eax,%ecx 804876a: 0f 4e c1 ...


-1

It seems to me like you aren't using the move assignment properly, you aren't moving anything but creating copies. The event_receiver is created from scratch and not moved. I know its tempting to write a move function thinking it will automatically be more efficient. But when writing such function the efficiency is gained from moving the object members ...


0

Almost. Doing #1 if it works, and if not #2 if it works, and if not #3 is a pretty basic tag dispatching/sfinae exercise. For #3: Create a namespace that is used nowhere else. Nest it in another. In the outer, put a =delete begin function that takes anything. Put a helper function that calls begin in it. That will find the adl begin, and otherwise the ...


1

The default move ctor simply does a move on each member (and base). Moving a primitive type just copies it. So this is well defined at that level. Semantically, however, it is an error: you should seek to avoid relying on details of the moved-from object's state, other than it being 'valid'.


3

make_shared<int> is analogous to new int not &.


1

Member functions require the & explicitly in order to form a pointer. This is an intentional design that pre-dates std::bind and is supposed to reduce programmer error. For example this code: Foo; will cause an error if Foo is a member function, but it is valid code if Foo is a free function. Probably the person intended to call the function and ...


2

If you use & on a "normal" function, you get a pointer to function. If you don't use it and pass it to std::bind, you are actually passing a reference to function; internally it's decayed to a pointer to function and stored as such. There's no "reference to member function", only "pointer to member function", so you have to use the & operator. The ...


1

Iterators come in different forms, some more general than others. vector iterators are called RandomAccess, the most general type. list iterators are Bidirectional. This means that they can move forward or backwards in steps of 1, but you can't use + or - to perform multiple movements at once. There is a standard function std::next that will perform ...


0

Firstly, if you replace your call in main with mul(2., 3.1) (two arguments), you code still won't compile in Clang and GCC. But in this case it will not compile simply because your single-argument mul is declared after the multiple-argument version. The single-argument version is not yet known at the point of declaration of multiple-argument version. If you ...


5

A few points applied: please do not blanket using namespace in relation to highly generic code. ADL will ruin your day unless you control it Operator %= is auto-rule assignment, meaning that automatic attribute propagation will be forced even in the presence of semantic actions. You don't want that because the attribute exposed by uint_parser will not be ...


1

You are trying to define the return type of mul in terms of the return type of mul. More precisely, you are using mul in the decltype expression, before it is fully declared (which is exactly, what the compiler error is telling you). MSVC's template instantiation works in a non-standard-conforming way, which is why I believe that clang is correct - it could, ...


0

As noted in the return_internal_reference documentation, the object returned references an existing internal object via either a pointer or reference: return_internal_reference [...] allow pointers and references to objects held internally [...] to be returned safely without making a copy of the referent. Boost.Python provides some concept checks, and ...


2

You have to problems. First of all, you're not declaring m1 and m4 as references, and they shall be so. Secondly, code style :). So, this shall solve it: Mutex &m1 = mutex_by_name("hello"); //... Mutex &m4 = mutex_by_name("hello");


1

In main you need to make m1 and m4 references (Mutex &m1). Right now they are copies and thus aren't updating the value in the unordered map.


0

C++11 includes most if not all of the previous standards, so your question trivially reduces to finding a C++ project. You should use Google or another Internet search engine for this. Or search directly on GitHub.


2

Why is it double const&? Well, that is the type of the variable. Is it related to decltype(())? Yes, no, not really, the rules for the two are subtly different, but should both be understood if you are planning on using them. decltype and auto are very useful additions to C++, a sound understanding of their meaning and use is very useful especially ...


3

The rules of decltype are fairly straightforward (especially when compared to lots of other rules in C++...). For an expression e, decltype(e) is (from [dcl.type.simple], paraphrasing): if e is an unparenthesized id-expression, then the type of e. Exactly the type of e. We're not dropping cv-qualifiers or references or anything. decltype(ci) is const int ...


1

The Problem When you call Record rec2(rec);, you have two viable constructors: your copy constructor Record(Record const&) and the variadic constructor with Refs = {Record&} which works out to Record(Record&). The latter is a better candidate since it's a less cv-qualified reference, so it wins even if that's not what you want. The Solution ...


2

Your problem is that ::std::map does not take only two template parameters. The solution is simply to add a template that takes only two parameters instead of four: template<typename key, typename value> using mymap = std::map<key, value>; (See it) Or, alternatively template<typename Key, typename Value, template <typename, typename, ...


7

You don't really need template template parameter in the first place. You could make it template<typename Map> struct ForEachOf { void operator()(const Map& map, std::function<void (typename Map::key_type, typename Map::mapped_type)> func) const { for(const auto& pair : map) { func(pair.first, ...


2

You should be able to use the range constructor: Matrix5T(std::initializer_list<std::initializer_list<MyListType> > matrixIn) : matrix(std::make_shared<std::vector<std::vector<MyListType> > >(matrixIn.begin(), matrixIn.end())) {}


0

It is not enough to have type deduction. The form of the type declaration must be exactly T&& (an rvalue reference to just a template parameter). If it's not (or there is no type deduction) the parameter is an rvalue reference. If the argument is an lvalue, it won't compile. Since T<A>&& does not have that form, f (T<A> ...


-1

I'd have code like this: #if GENERATE_CODE .... code to generate the C++ code describing the encrypted literal .... generating exactly the code in the #else part #else static char encryptedLicense [32] = "..."; or whatever #endif Not trying to be clever. Copy the #if code in a separate file, compile and run, paste the result back.


2

Here's how I would do it: 1.) Use the str_const template for constexpr string manipulation described here: Conveniently Declaring Compile-Time Strings in C++ Code: class str_const { // constexpr string private: const char * const p_; const std::size_t sz_; public: template <std::size_t N> constexpr str_const(const ...


1

It's a bad practice to overload on forwarding references (see Effective modern C++, Item 26). They tend to devour everything you pass to them due to overload resolution rules. In your example, you're constructing a Record object out of a non-const Record object and that's why your copy ctor doesn't get executed. If you call it like this Record ...


2

In your example, the forwarding reference is used with Record&. So you may add an extra overload for Record& (to forward to copy constructor): Record(Record& other) : Record(static_cast<const Record&>(other)) {} or use sfinae on the one with forwarding reference.


3

You need to specialize for A<T>: template <typename T> struct is_A : std::false_type { }; template <typename T> struct is_A<A<T>> : std::true_type { };


0

As for overcoming the problem, I guess a more or less equivalent way would be to deduce it with a forward reference, and trigger the comparison with T<A> manually. template<typename T> class X; template<template<typename> class T, typename A> class X<T<A>> { public: using type = A; template<typename _> ...


2

Why does the second example not work as expected? You have two signatures: template <typename T> decltype(auto) f (T&& ); template <template <typename> typename T, typename A> ...


4

When you call some function f with some lvalue: int a = 42; f(a); Then f must be able to accept such an lvalue. This is the case when the first parameter of f is a (lvalue) reference type, or when it's not a reference at all: auto f(int &); auto f(int); // assuming a working copy constructor This won't work when the parameter is a rvalue reference: ...


3

The issue is the result of the most vexing parse. In particular, the following declares two functions: class_fun1 f1(); // function declaration class_fun2 f2(); // function declaration The first declares a function named f1 that takes no arguments and returns an instance of class_func1. It does not declare an instance of class_func1 with an identifier ...


0

I think your question is way too vague to have a definitive answer. For example, one answer could be: just store shared_ptrs in your deque. But then you might argue "it's not good for me because there's an additional allocation/indirection" or it may be good enough for you. There are a lot of questions about your use case that need to be clarified before ...


2

No matter how you approach it, it boils down to using a std::mutex to implement thread-safe access to objects and class members. You could use a std::mutex just long enough to make a copy of the objects or class members, and return the copy to the caller, to do with it as it wishes. But if you do not wish to make private thread copies of shared class ...


1

The only way I can think of to store a lambda in a class is to use a template with a helper make_ function: #include <cstdio> #include <utility> template<class Lambda> class MyClass { Lambda _t; public: MyClass(Lambda &&t) : _t(std::forward<Lambda>(t)) { _t(); } }; template<class Lambda> ...


0

You are calling main() in your DisplayElements function, while I don't know that that is disallowed by the compiler you're using, it's usually a bad idea. I don't know geany but it wouldn't surprise me to find that when main() is entered there is a lot of startup processing that shouldn't be done more than once. In your AddElements function, you will want ...



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