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0

Thanks very much for your posting !! Your post ended my 4 Hours of struggle.


0

For your question # 2 - How to convert QString to UTF-16 QByteArray, there is a solution with QTextCodec::fromUnicode(), as shown in the following code example: #include <QCoreApplication> #include <QTextCodec> #include <QDebug> int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { QCoreApplication a(argc, argv); // QString to QByteArray // ...


1

The problem there is that a is const and therefore operator=, which does modify the object, is disallowed. This is caused by const-correctness. On the other hand, the following is allowed: int main() { A b; const A a = b; //Error: discarding qualifier } because in that case it's construction of a new constant object.


0

Probably the dll can't be load because the error: "An attempt was made to load a program with an incorrect format.". A dll build with platform taget "x86" work fine in a Win 7 x86 or x64 but don't work in a Win 2012 Server x64. Compile the dll with platform target "Any CPU"


0

Although documented as being available, apparently it is a documentation bug, since it is not. However, the man page does point to an alternative interface: sysctl(). You can use the sysctlbyname() interface to get the physical memory in bytes. #include <iostream> #include <stdint.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/types.h> ...


3

You are going into undefined behaviour. You return a dangling pointer in five. int result[ARR_SIZE]; life-time is limited by scope of five, therefore it gets freed at the end. Taking its address and returning it does not prolong its life. This decltype(result) *final_arr=&result; effectively doesn't do anything except hiding the error. You could have ...


0

VX is destoyed when the scope of your function meshGen1d ends. If you want to return a live object like this, you should create it with new, and destroy it outside this function with delete. Because this split responsibility of who creates and who destroys the object, you can also pass in a vector by reference like this: void meshGen1d(double xmin, double ...


2

Your code produces undefined behavior - returning dangling pointer from five function - it means you are returning a pointer which points to an object, which is allocated on the stack.


0

You need to implement an equality operator or functor for the key type of the map. Otherwise the equality operator for tr1::shared_ptr is used, and that doesn't do what you need. For example, struct myequal { bool operator()(const std::tr1::shared_ptr<data>& lhs, const std::tr1::shared_ptr<data>& rhs) const { ...


0

It looks like you've defined a hash function but no equality function. So your 'identical' keys sort into the same hash buckets but don't index the same values in the map.


0

If you're emulating Maya's constraint system, Maya handles Z rotation through the up vector, which adjusts your Z rotation to align with one of five options: scene up aims the top of your camera to +Y object up aims the top of your camera toward a third object object rotation up matches the camera's Z rotation to the XYZ rotation of a third object vector ...


0

The MFC version of GetDlgItem uses the HWND of the class making the call. In your CHelixV3Dlg example it is using the dialog HWND and accessing a child control of that window. This function is only for accessing child windows.


0

Creating the threads: threadParam data = {stream1, this}; threadParam data2 = {stream2, this}; CreateThread(NULL, 0, PlayThread, (PVOID) &data, 0, &threadId); CreateThread(NULL, 0, PlayThread, (PVOID) &data2, 0, &threadId2); Inside the thread dataNew->pointer->PlayNote(a, no); The problem is that you are using the same objects ...


0

I figure this out and here is the solution if anyone else runs into similar issue. The problem was InterfaceClassGuid in the line below. GUID InterfaceClassGuid = HID_CLASSGUID; HID_CLASSGUID was set to the following in my code: #define HID_CLASSGUID {0x4d1e55b2, 0xf16f, 0x11cf,{ 0x88, 0xcb, 0x00, 0x11, 0x11, 0x00, 0x00, 0x30}} This was wrong, I ...


1

That's just the conventional human-readable notation, not valid C++ syntax. A GUID is a wrapper for a number, and the documentation tells you how Microsoft allows you to set it. In particular, they provide a constructor that takes a string in various formats; for example: GUID InterfaceClassGuid("745a17a0-74d3-11d0-b6fe-00a0c90f57da");


-1

I don't know about GUID object but what you're giving is not a valid value, it seems that it should be either a string, { "745a17a0-74d3-11d0-b6fe-00a0c90f57da" } or a hex value, { 0x745a17a0, 0x74d3, 0x11d0, 0xb6fe, 0x00a0c90f57da } Sharing the compilation error would help, though.


0

In glibc-2.5 there are two versions of pthread_cond_init. The old one, which is probably used, has a comment that neither clocks other than CLOCK_REALTIME are supported, and EINVAL can be returned. In line 642 of gthread-posix.c there's the call pthread_condattr_setclock (&attr, CLOCK_MONOTONIC); which probably causes the return of EINVAL from ...


1

cancel that, i managed to do it by ignoring the cv::triangulate function and using this method here: http://www.morethantechnical.com/2012/01/04/simple-triangulation-with-opencv-from-harley-zisserman-w-code/ with a small change to fix some code that was in wrong place... Mat_<double> IterativeLinearLSTriangulation(Point3d u, //homogenous image ...


0

Increase the value APT::Cache-Limit at the /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/70debconf sudo gedit /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/70debconf and add the following to the end of the file: APT::Cache-Limit "10000000"; then run sudo apt-get clean sudo apt-get update --fix-missing


2

If the arrays can be sorted on title, then one solution would be to use std::set_intersection. Pre C++ 11 code: #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <algorithm> #include <iterator> #include <string> #include <ostream> struct stockTest { std::string title; std::string getTitle() const { return title; } ...


1

Unless there's something weird going on, you don't need dynamic allocation here. If the type is an aggregate, then you can simply initialise it in the declaration: Sensor left = {1 /*, other variables */}; If it's not an aggregate, then the const member will have to be initialised in a constructor: struct Sensor { const unsigned char pin; ...


0

The current answer points out the concurrency in the code, but please note that not all data-structures have to be implemented with locks to attain thread-safety. There are also lock-free data structures. For this particular case, we could the Harris lock free linked list: https://timharris.uk/papers/2001-disc.pdf While I know that pointing out ...


1

First, you reinitialize counter to 0 every iteration of the first loop which probably has something to do with it. Second, i would do something like the following with two for loops: int counter = 0; for(int i = 0; i<3; i++) { for(int j=0; j<9; j++) { if(array1[i] = array2[j]) { counter++; } } } It is difficult to ...


1

The fact that private variables have a leading m is an implementation detail, clients shouldn't rely on it. Your getters are public and should never change even if you change your implementation. Therefore, it's not a question of being easy to use. You should write getX() for better encapsulation.


9

This would lead to the getter being named getmX(). No, it wouldn't. The entity is "called" x. The member variable you used to represent that entity is mX. The getter function you used to access that entity is getX(). I wouldn't go too far down the path of getters and setters, though; they're a bit of an anti-pattern when only thinly wrapping ...


0

Just only needs to be performed once, after which the global variable you've created will be available for any project. Open the Settings menu and select "Global variables..." Click the "New" button next to the Current variable list, specify a name like "cpp-netlib", and hit OK In the "base" field of the Builtin fields section, browse for the base of ...


0

If I understand what you have written correctly, the web server is forwarding requests to your C++ program, and you want a PHP application to read the data by making a web request to the web server, which in turn forwards the request to the C++ program for serving the response. Here are three ideas for improving the speed of this setup: Consider using a ...


1

const_cast is safe only if you're casting a variable that was originally non-const.


0

No that code does not make sense. The pin member is const so you can't assign to it except in the initializer. The pin member, is not a pointer so assgning malloc() to it is not going to compile correctly. I think you need to remove const from the struct field, that doesn't make any sense at all. If you want to prevent accidentally modifying it, you make ...


1

When I push back one time, I get 2 calls to destructor. 2 push backs, I get 5 calls to destructor. 3 push backs, I get 9 calls to destructor. Before C++11, when you push back an object to a std::vector system copy the object to the container. So if you do one push back system created 2 objects, so system has to call 2 times destructor to clean up. ...


2

Short answer: yes. Long answer: maybe, but probably yes in your case. The primary point of polymorphism is to make that kind of basic logic of asking, "What type of employee is this? Oh, it's a part-time employee? Do the right thing for part-time employees" an automatic, rather than manual process. Inheritance and virtual functions are one means of doing ...


-2

As all the answers states, one is a pointer and the other an iterator, we must use &vec[0] instead of vec.begin() : why it's better to use &vec[0] when using vector as an array is that that is how we use arrays, an iterator has many additionnal use (and memory) that you don't need


2

The array turned out to be in a superclass constructor default initializer: std::array<double,2> range = { 0 } That particular g++ chokes on that, and: std::array<double,2> range = { 0.0, 0.0 } But: std::array<double,2> range = { } Works. Good thing I don't need any non-zero values there...


2

vec.begin() has type std::vector<int>::iterator. &vec[0] has type pointer to std::vector<int>::value_type. These are not necessarily the same type. It is possible that a given implementation uses pointers as the iterator implementation for a vector, but this is not guaranteed, and thus you should not rely on that assumption. In fact most ...


1

Formally, one produces an iterator, and the other a pointer, but I think the major difference is that vec[0] will do bad stuff if the vector is empty, while vec.begin() will not.


2

I assume you situation is like this: you have a class aclass { edge_t edge(void) ; edge_t edge(void) const ; } ; The second version will be called if you have a const object, the non const otherwise. So if you have const aclass x ; aclass y ; x.edge() ; // calls the second y.edge() ; calls the first const_cast<const aclass &>(y).edge() ; ...


3

A std::vector is sequence container that encapsulates dynamic size arrays. This lets you conveniently store a bunch of elements without needing to be as concerned with managing the underlying array that is the storage for your elements. A large part of the convenience of using these classes comes from the fact that they give you a bunch of methods that let ...


1

when you do push_back and the vector don't have enough memory to store the new elements it has to resize, each time the vector resize it calls the destructor of the old elements. Try this: std::vector<Student> Univ(3); Univ.push_back(Student("fn1", "ln1", 1)); Univ.push_back(Student("fn2", "ln2", 2)); Univ.push_back(Student("fn3", "ln3", 3)); ...


0

Do you have some detailed requirements about the location of Employee (base or derived) objects in memory?


2

first of all, is it safe to return a pointer? Yes. The object is in a list, so pointers and references to it remain valid until it's removed. When I cast Employee* to a FullTimeEmployee*, obviuosly I lose the grade field. You've already lost it before then - when you converted to Employee to put it in the list. If you want to store objects of ...


0

Here's an example: #include<iostream> #include<windows.h> using namespace std; SetWindowPos(hwnd, HWND_TOPMOST, 0, 0, 0, 0, SWP_NOMOVE | SWP_NOSIZE | SWP_SHOWWINDOW); int main(){ cout<<"Hello World"; } Or You should be using SetConsoleScreenBufferSize SetConsoleWindowInfo There's an example at ...


2

You are creating a temporary Student which you pass to push_back, which copies it into the vector. The upshot is that you use two copies of each Student instance, and the destructor of each is called. Additionally, when you add more Students and the vector resizes, the existing contents are copied to the newly allocated memory, resulting in even more ...


0

The solution is to build your own C++ Connector and use the dll files it compiles. The dll distributed by Oracle was made with a different version of Visual Studio compiler that I am currently using. The first answer here will show you how to build it yourself. MySQL Connector C++ 64bit build from source in Visual Studio 2012?


1

I had the same problem this morning and i found a solution in the Avro Test Cpp file("DataFileTests.cc") with the "testWriteGeneric" function. For example: My Schema file(cpx.json): { "type": "record", "name": "cpx", "fields" : [ {"name": "re", "type": "double"}, {"name": "im", "type" : "int"} ] } My Cpp file: typedef ...


1

Based on Dominic's answer, I looked at http://docs.travis-ci.com/user/ci-environment/ and found TRAVIS_PYTHON_VERSION. So no need to fiddle with any files. script: - python setup.py test - if [[ $TRAVIS_PYTHON_VERSION == '3.4' ]]; then (cd src && CC=gcc-4.8 CXX=g++-4.8 make -f Makefile-custom test); fi


5

setf will set flags, but not clear them. So setf(ios_base::fixed) will set the "fixed" flag, but setf(initial) will leave it set. Use flags to assign all the flags. cout.flags(initial);


0

You have this struct: typedef struct Sp_cashinfo { LPSTR lpPhysicalPositionName; ULONG ulInitialCount; ULONG ulCount; }SP_CASHUNITINFO; Assuming that LPSTR is from the windows types then it is a typedef for char * on most modern systems. If that is the case then you need to allocate memory for that array along with the space for the struct. ...


2

The bits from std::fixed are still present in the std::ios_base::floatfield portion of the mask. You need to clear that mask first then set initial: std::cout.setf(initial, std::ios_base::floatfield); // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


0

#include <opencv2/opencv.hpp> #include <iostream> using namespace cv; using namespace std; int main() { Mat img; VideoCapture cap(0); while (true) { cap >> img; Mat edges; cvtColor(img, edges, CV_BGR2GRAY); Canny(edges, edges, 30, 60); imshow("window label", edges); ...


0

I think there should be something like this in your steppermotor.h class StepperMotor{ //some more stuff public: unsigned char stepPin; unsigned char dirPin; unsigned char sensorPin; const char* ident; unsigned int stepVal; } This is how member variables are declared in c++. I think it might be usefull though to read some c++ tutorial, to ...



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