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0

If there are classes in the header, you cannot use the header in C because C has no classes (among other things). To use C++ code with C you need to provide a pure C interface.


-1

Please have a read of this page ... http://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/89-class-code-and-header-files/


-1

template<int c> struct Derived : Base<c> { static const int b = Base<c>::a + 5; }; It really depends on compiler, but gcc requires it, it plays stupid when it comes to template classes


0

Better use the stl vector, this have the size() method #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; int main() { vector<int> p; int kek = 0; cin >> kek; p.resize(kek); for (int i = 0; i < kek; i++) { p[i] = 0; } int sizeOfArray = p.size(); cout << ...


1

That code was never really supposed to work (what does it mean to write an input stream to an output stream?!) but used to work "by accident" because streams in C++03 had an implicit conversion to void* which could be used to test the stream's status, and so you could print the value of the void*. In C++11 the conversion has been replaced with an explicit ...


0

You are just taking the size of the pointer. But just use std::vector


0

#include <iostream> using namespace std; struct A { int a; int b; }; struct B : A { //c++ 0x B(int a, int b, int c) : A{ a, b }, c(c) {} int c; }; int main() { B b{ 1,2,3 }; cout << b.a << b.b << b.c << endl; }


0

in BMI::BMI(string name,intheight,double weight){ theres no space between int and height. This causes BMI person_1("John",89,90.0); to refer to a constructor that doesn't exist.


2

When you call f(0), the argument is of type int which can convert into _c. It is usual one-step conversion. However, when you call _f([]() {}), the argument is lambda-type (generated by the compiler), not of the type std::function<void(void)>. So in this case, it needs two conversions — one from lambda-type to std::function<void(void)>, ...


1

You need to define a constructor in bStruct like this: bStruct(int a, int b, int c) : aStruct{a, b}, c(c) {} This will initialize aStruct and the c field. Note: This is c++11 code.


0

Check out the Invoke() action. It allows you to specify arbitrary behavior for a mock method. There are a number of variations, but one form will look something like this: RClass fake(int x) { return RClass(x); } ON_CALL(mc, DoIt(_)) .WillByDefault(Invoke(&fake)); If you're the C++11 type, lambdas also work: ON_CALL(mc, DoIt(_)) ...


0

You check the products from the lowest i. i.e,you check in the following way : 100 X 100 100 X 101 100 X 102 .... .... .... 101 X 100 .... .... .... So now it may seem to you that you are getting the smallest pallindrome.But it maynot even be the smallest.This is because : Let 100 X 100 , 100 X 101 , 100 X 102 not give a pallindrome number. ...


2

You're using "aggregate initialization" but a class with a base class cannot be an aggregate, so you cannot use aggregate initialization. As the comment above says, if you add a suitable constructor then you can use the same syntax: struct bStruct : aStruct { constexpr bStruct(int a, int b, int c) : aStruct{a, b}, c(c) { } int c; }; (You don't ...


0

I think you are right and this must be a version issue since my book is so old and I am typing in exactly what it says and it isn't working. I guess I should learn from a more updated book.


0

Link with the /verbose option and search the output for the name of the library in question. This will tell you which object file dragged the library into the link.


0

You should not use a regular expression for this. If you want to find out whether a string is one of two words, just use a straightforward equality comparison: if (str == "bananas" || str == "pajamas") { // OK } If you have more possibilities, you can use some sort of a set: const std::unordered_set<std::string> words { "bananas", ...


0

Not gonna give you the code here in-case you want to devise an implementation yourself. (Ruins the practice that you desire.) but take a look at these: A Wikipedia article is always nice place to start: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radix_sort Really good, more indepth explanation: https://www.cs.princeton.edu/~rs/AlgsDS07/18RadixSort.pdf This actually ...


0

Regex string should have \bbananas\b|\bpajamas\b. but in c++, "\bbananas\b|\bpajamas\b" return bbananasb|bpajamasb. for this reason, you have to use extra \ with \ like "\\bbananas\\b|\\bpajamas\\b"


0

You try to make binary search on non-sorted array which is not supported by function. I am not sure if it can lead to segmentation fault but it is clearly not correct.


0

The solution has a couple steps to it. You need to generate an Ada record for that struct. g++ has a built in tool for doing this. Run: g++ -c -fdump-ada-spec "MyData.h" -C And you will get a mydata_h.ads which has a definition of a record that matches your struct. It should look like this: with Interfaces.C; use Interfaces.C; package MyData_h is ...


3

You have a few problems in your code but this off-by-one stands out: for(int i=0;i<v3.size()+1;i++) ^^^^ // ... if(v2[k]==v3[i]) ^^^^


1

You declare your vector with a size, then continue to push_back to add elements vector<int> v1(n); for(int i=0;i<n;i++) { scanf("%d",&element); v1.push_back(element); } So if n was 5, you would have 10 elements. 5 were initialized, then 5 are pushed back. {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} ^initialized ^push_back You should reserve ...


0

Not actually an answer. I just found it interesting to express the solution in the form of Python expression: >>> d = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 6] >>> print [max(min(d[i:i+l]) for i in range(len(d)-l+1)) for l in range(1,len(d)+1)] [6, 4, 4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1] Not because of performance but because of compactness.


0

You're very likely missing a DLL. Try running the generated .exe file straight from windows console, as it often reports which DLL is missing. Come back with the error you're getting. I haven't used VS2005, but maybe you're missing the VC++2005 Redistributable (available here).


0

The following callback indirection will solve this problem: d = cdll.LoadLibrary(r"myfunctions.dll") callback_type = CFUNCTYPE(None, c_int ) callback = callback_type(mypy_callback) d.SetCallback(callback)


0

Construct the map again by swapping the keys map<string, map<string, string> > groupList; ^ ^ | | swap these two keys or copy the map into a 2d vector and sort the vector by defining a custom comparator like struct cmpr { typedef const std::pair<std::string, std::pair<std::string, std::string> ...


0

Your Mistake Is In The calc()Function.Take A Look: int Calc(int x, int op, int y) { if (op == 1); //the ; is not needed, remove it! return x + y; //same happens with the rest of the conditions, remove all semicolons after the if conditions //... }


0

Although backslash is a special character in INI files, most Windows applications don't escape backslashes () in file paths [...] QSettings always treats backslash as a special character and provides no API for reading or writing such entries. This is what the documentation has to say about it. It is a polite way of saying "if some other code does ...


1

I agree with @Slava on not using a map for this purpose. My suggestion is to use a simple vector and sort it according to different rules. Something like this: std::vector<std::tuple<std::string, std::string, std::string>> GroupList ; GroupList glist ; std::sort(glist.begin(), glist.end(), mysort<0>) ; where template <int N> ...


0

here's my errors Error 1 error C2039: 'fmaf' : is not a member of 'global namespace'' c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 12.0\vc\include\xtgmath.h 126 1 points Error 2 error C3861: 'fmaf': identifier not found c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 12.0\vc\include\xtgmath.h 126 1 points Error 3 error C2039: ...


0

Your code has the following: int Calc(int x, int op, int y) { if (op == 1); return x + y; if (op == 2); return x-y; if (op == 3); the problem is the ; after if (op == 1);. This is being evaluated and nothing is happening, then you are always performing return x + y;. A better way to do loops is to always ...


3

When you put a ; after an if clause it means that the if is an empty block.Therefore whether the statement is true or false the statement next to if is always excecuted.So your code if (op == 1); return x + y; evaluates to : if (op == 1) { //empty block } return x + y; Therefore always addition is returned.


3

if (op == 1);//this semicolon makes the statement end here so it tests the condition and ends the statement return x + y;//so this is an independent statement and will always be executed So remove the semicolon at the end of all if(condition) statements


0

Though technically it is possible to sort std::map based on value rather than the key, I would strongly not recommend that, as it would lead to buggy and very difficult to support code. Key for std::map is not mutable and it follows std::map design, if you use comparator on value and modify it, you will get unpredictable behaviour. You may use std::set ...


0

The book's second max function that compares two C-strings is actually defined as inline char const* max( char const* a, char const* b) { return std::strcmp(a, b) < 0 ? b : a; } So the call max(a,b) inside max(max(a,b),c) is not the culprit. It is because max(max(a,b),c) is overload-resolved to max( char const* a, char const* b) where a takes the ...


1

When it comes to camera management, most people seem to make it far more difficult than it had to be. The key point is matrix math. Consider an object with world matrix W, which consists of a rotation and a translation part. If we want to move this object to its right, we can just multiply an according translation matrix to W (note that all further ...


0

Ok, funny, as Ganesh R. rightly pointed out: It does not work with Visual Studio 2013 anymore. So I switched to Mingw and,...perfect!


1

C++ supports this with the myFunc(A()); syntax you posed in your question. #include <stdio.h> char lazybuff[500]; class Point { public: Point (double x, double y) : m_x(x), m_y(y) { } char * ToString (void) { sprintf (lazybuff, "%f, %f", m_x, m_y); return lazybuff; } private: double m_x, m_y; }; void print_point (Point print_me) { ...


0

Use sort and unique. Use sort to but all duplicate values adjacent to each other than unique puts all vales that are adjacent to each other at the end and returns an iterator pointing to the first duplicate element. Then we use a while loop to remove those elements. Remember generic algorithms never delete elements in a container. #include <iostream> ...


1

If you just want to create a variable to pass to the function you can use a aggregate initialization / list initialization #include <iostream> #include <cmath> using namespace std; class A{ /*... snip ...*/ }; void myFunc(A a){ } int main(){ myFunc(A{}); return 0; } Live Example You can also use this with classes that have ...


4

Manipulating types with types is usually easier. template<class K0, class K1, class...Ks> struct my_map; template<class K0, class K1, class...Ks> using my_map_t = typename my_map<K0,K1,Ks...>::type; template<class K0, class K1> struct my_map<K0,K1>{using type=std::map<K0, K1>;}; template<class K0, class K1, class ...


0

The 'Open With...' menu is located at the registry key: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts, from there you can create some functions to retrieve the data. MSDN has a slew of registry functions to get/set values as well as traverse the trees. As doing this isn't a trivial bit of code (a lot of error checking to be ...


1

When building project files with CMake, you have to make sure to install all dependencies and (usually) use the compiler suggested in the docs of whatever source code you are building project files for. In this case, you'll need Qt 4.x installed, along with the Visual C++ 2008 compiler. After doing that, you should be able to tell CMake to use that version ...


5

Yes: this is called embedding. The best place to start is the official Python documentation on the topic. There's some sample code that shows how to call a Python function from C code. Here's an extremely basic example, also from the Python docs: #include <Python.h> int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { Py_SetProgramName(argv[0]); /* optional ...


0

You can use JSONLint to validate json string. Your example fixed: int i_val; unsigned int ui_val; float f_val; const char* json = "{ \"array\":[14, -15, 3.17], \"array_type\" : [\"uint\", \"int\", \"float\"] }"; rapidjson::Document d; d.Parse<0>(json); rapidjson::Value& a = d["array"]; rapidjson::Value& at = d["array_type"]; for ...


0

I agree with the others not to override the == operator. The reason is that those operators are the major reason to use a valarray. If you do not need element-wise operators simply do not use valarray. Also you might need the original version of the operator at some point so why would you throw it away? I like p.i.g s solution, but if efficiency is a major ...


0

Make a native extension (Python 2 or Python 3) out of your C++ code, and have your Python program import it. Then use py2exe or your favorite platform's counterpart to turn the Python program and your native extension into an executable.


0

You could use some mechanism to treat your 2d array as 1d array and this will save you extra space. If you have a an integer p,you can extract row number and column number as follows rownumber=p/columnsize; columnnumber=p%columnsize; following is an implementation of bubble sort using the above #include <iostream> using namespace std; ...


0

If you want to sort a 2D array as if it were a 1D array (interpreted row-first or column-first) there's no real need to physically copy it to an 1D array first. You can always pretend that you already have an imaginary 1D array, whose indices i are mapped to the indices of the original 2D array through the following formulas i_row = i / columns; i_column = ...


0

You can use one ifstream variable for multiple files like this std::ifstream file("file_1"); // do something file.close(); file.clear(); file.open("file_2"); // do something EDIT: Putting this inside loop std::ifstream file; std::vector<std::string> filenames; for (int i = 0; i < filenames.size(); ++i) { file.open(filenames[i].c_str()); ...



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