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0

sizeHint() has to be overridden in the QListView (respectively your subclass of it). This special behaviour can be implemented there. eg like this: QSize ProposalListView::sizeHint() const { if (model()->rowCount() == 0) return QSize(width(), 0); int nToShow = _nItemsToShow < model()->rowCount() ? _nItemsToShow : ...


0

More generic is to use Boost Multi-Arrays. MultiArrays allow you to specify ranges of all sorts, that you can then feed into std::sort, depending on what subset of the 2D array you want to sort. http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_56_0/libs/multi_array/doc/user.html#sec_views


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You need to consider that a log file shouldn't have too much write latency, as you need to be able to examine recent log entries in case of a failure. Output buffering has diminishing returns as you increase the buffer size. Going from zero to 1 byte doubles your speed, as it cuts system calls in half; going from 1 to 4096 or 8192 is a major win as it ...


8

In C++ the syntax: Typename ( arguments ) means to create an unnamed object (aka. a temporary object) of type Typename 1. The arguments are passed to the constructor of that object (or used as initializers for primitive types). It is very similar in meaning to your second example: Complex somenumber( Real, Imaginary); return somenumber; the only ...


0

Why do you want to use Atom? I suggest you try Visual Studio 2013 - Intellisense is incredibly smart and helpful, it instantly finds both syntax and logic bugs. Atom does none of that. Later, I would recommend you get a full version of Visual Studio (if you're a student, for example, you might get it for free) and Visual Assist X by Whole Tomato - a tool I ...


1

I tried the excellent class above and it still needs a couple edits. The decimal point search was reducing the range specified by "top" because it returned a "-1" when there is no decimal point. I added a conditional statement that fixes that. Also, it still needs to be tweaked for the case where the user tries to delete the decimal point and the ...


0

This is everything you need to know: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&ei=6f8EVILBHYjBOP35gOAN&url=http://dottonetto.com/home/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Programming-with-gtkmm-3.pdf&cd=1&ved=0CBsQFjAA&usg=AFQjCNEAIkFNCENMdOh0VvUo4zmDymL9cw&sig2=HKTiOjNFUdauvTGIQUlnhQ


4

strcpy does not allocate any memory. In the C Standard the function is described the following way The strcpy function copies the string pointed to by s2 (including the terminating null character) into the array pointed to by s1. If copying takes place between objects that overlap, the behavior is undefined. Returns 3 The strcpy function returns ...


1

Visual studio must have an extreme overhead, for non optimized std:: code, in particular the priority queue class. I tested your program with g++, first no optimizations. 9800 1.42229 0.014159 9900 1.45233 0.014341 10000 1.48106 0.014606 Notice my vector times are close to yours. The priority queue times on the other hand are ...


1

You have a O (N^2) algorithm running 4 times faster than a O (N log N) algorithm. Or at least you think you do. The obvious thing to do would be to verify your assumption. There's not much that you can conclude from sizes 9600, 9800 and 10000. Try sizes 1000, 2000, 4000, 8000, 16000, 32000. Does the first algorithm increase the time by a factor 4 each time ...


5

I think you can statically link the run time library using /MT instread of /MD see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2kzt1wy3.aspx Right Click your project -> Properties -> C/C++ -> Code Generation -> Set "Runtime Library" to "/MTd" for debug and "/MT" for release builds


7

the 3rd column is larger than the second for the array sizes considered. The "Big O" notation only tells you how the time grows with the input size. Your times are (or should be) A + B*N^2 for the quadratic case, C + D*N*LOG(N) for the linearithmic case. But it is entirely possible that C is much larger than A, leading to a higher ...


4

C2146 gives a rather unhelpful error message but ultimately the problem is you're missing the typename keyword where there are dependent scopes. iterator depends on the instantiation of std::map<ui16, Node> and requires the typename keyword to disambiguate your usage. For more information, please consult Where and why do I have to put the “template” ...


0

There is no good way to do this. I use the following code. Header: class List_view_auto_height : public QObject { Q_OBJECT public: explicit List_view_auto_height(QListView * target_list); void set_max_auto_height(int value); void set_min_height(int value); private: QListView* list; QTimer timer; int _min_height; int _max_height; bool ...


1

If you can't use vector and insist on having a separate class for a deck, then you should have a Deck holding an array of Cards: class Deck { Card cards[52]; };


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The approach of making Card derive from Deck is incorrect. When you type in class Card : public Deck, you are making a is-a relationship between Card and Deck, so that Card is a Deck. Naturally, this is not right. You want a deck to be a sequence of cards, and you don't even need a new data type for that. std::vector<Card> deck; If you want, you ...


0

The best advice someone gave me for resource constrained embedded systems is: Stay off the heap. You may not be leaking memory, you are likely just fragmenting it. The program you show is allocating and deallocating structures on a FIFO queue. That pattern has poor chance operating robustly. When a second object is added to the heap and put on the ...


1

When the linker scans the library files, it only links the object code necessary to resolve the symbols not resolved by earlier object code or libraries. Unreferenced object code from archives will not be linked. Specifying redundant libraries may extend the build time. You can help that by specifying the most used libraries first, but in all but the ...


2

1) Your command is simply "linking". It's fine as-is. 2) "static" linking would mean to specify "-Bstatic", or specify a static ".a" library. Here are a couple of good links that explain "static" vs. "dynamic" linking: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/84461/MinGW-Static-and-Dynamic-Libraries From MinGW static library (.a) to Visual Studio static ...


4

Change the format specifier from %d to %ld, or change the data type of argument to be int. (%lu would be for unsigned long int.) Alternatively, you could use std::cin for input and std::cout for output. You don't have to use printf/scanf-style type codes; the correct overload for the type of operand would be called automatically.


0

In general, whenever a query is executed that changes a table (without error) and the results are not shown, this means that the changes were not committed. Looking at your code, you have this: SQLSetConnectAttr(DBCHandle, SQL_ATTR_AUTOCOMMIT, (SQLPOINTER)SQL_AUTOCOMMIT_OFF, SQL_IS_INTEGER);} You set the connection attribute to have ...


0

You're using SQL_AUTOCOMMIT_OFF, which means your statements won't be automatically committed, so your new record is visible only in your transaction and will never be committed in the database. Try to use the auto-commit feature of the MS SQL Server (setting SQL_ATTR_AUTOCOMMIT to SQL_AUTOCOMMIT_ON or just leave it uninformed since it's the default ...


0

I had same problem on ARM using GCC compiler, where write into memory is only through bytes rather than 32bit word. The solution is to define bit-fields using volatile uint32_t (or required size to write): union { volatile uint32_t XY; struct { volatile uint32_t XY_A : 4; volatile uint32_t XY_B : 12; }; }; but while compiling ...


0

You may have a look at Boost Spirit, which allows you to write easily lexical analysers (Boost.Lex), and parsers (Boost.Qi) . It has an interesting approach consisting of defining the syntax/grammar directly in the C++ code instead of using a separated grammar file. It's portable, standard, self-contained and very elegant. You could consided Flex and ...


2

for(T j = 0; j < num_of_treats; j++) { Inside this loop, j is clearly a valid index into the array max_profit. But you're not using just j.


1

This will recursively apply your rule, unwinding templates until you get to a non-template parameter: template<class T> struct param_id : std::integral_constant< int, T::paramId > {}; template<template<class...>class Z, class T, class... Args> struct param_id<Z<T,Args...>> : param_id<T> {}; template<class T> ...


0

I ran into this issue recently and found the answers incomplete for my need, so I came up with this short and sweet snippet: using boost::property_tree::ptree; void parse_tree(const ptree& pt, std::string key) { std::string nkey; if (!key.empty()) { // The full-key/value pair for this node is // key / pt.data() // So do with it what ...


4

To make long story short: a braced initializer expression {}has no type by itself auto has to infer type information int{3} obviously means "create an int var with value taken from initializer list", thus it's type is just int and can be used in any wider context (int i = int{3} will work and auto i = int{3} can deduce type, because right side is obviously ...


0

Some Linux programs can be compiled on Windows via Mingw. Here is how I did it: How to compile a Linux program with Mingw?


2

Answering (I hope) this question and your prior question here, This answer applies to FindResource, though you can adapt to FindResourceEx The parameters to FindResource are module-to-search, id, and type. The first is the instance handle who'd resource table to search. You can use NULL for the running process, Otherwise this is in a DLL you need to save ...


1

You can use a custom type trait to detect if a type is a template : template <class> struct is_template : std::false_type {}; template <template <class...> class T, typename ...Args> struct is_template<T<Args...>> : std::true_type {}; And use std::enable_if to select the correct overload (enable an overload if the type is a ...


0

also, one might have overloaded the void* operator to be converting-operator for a class. dynamic_cast<void*>() can help us figure out in runtime either the casting was successful or not and deal with errors accordingly .


1

You have somewhat of a chicken and egg problem here. The arguments GL_MAJOR_VERSION and GL_MINOR_VERSION for glGetIntegerv() were only introduced in OpenGL 3.x (some spec information suggests 3.0, some 3.1). It looks like your context does not have at least this version, so you can't use this API to check the version. If you need at least 3.x for your code ...


1

That the folder is hidden is not relevant. That has no impact here. As discussed in the comments, the fact that you are casting the lpCommandLine argument indicates that szPathToFile is not the correct type. It must be a pointer to a modifiable array of wide characters. If it was then you could omit the cast and the compiler would accept szPathToFile ...


1

2 things: MAKEINTRESOURCE(RT_RCDATA) should be RT_RCDATA according to the docs. The first parameter is the handle to the binary (DLL/exe) holding the resource, NULL implies the executable.


1

I'd say, it's because a construction is never a thread communication operation: When you construct an object, you fill formerly uninitialized memory with sensible values. There is no way for another thread to tell whether that operation has finished unless it is explicitely communicated by the constructing thread. If you race with construction anyway, you ...


3

Risking to be downvoted for premature optimization, and because it doesn't really answers the question asked, still I would like to remind about a serious problem in such approach. Like any multidimensional array, vector of vector is not contiguous, which makes its performance characteristics terribly bad because of lacking of spatial locality and ...


4

You can use at twice. Also note, if i and j are indexes, they really shouldn't be double. void Connection::setWeight(const double& value, const size_t& i, const size_t& j) { weight.at(i).at(j) = value; }


0

The moment you call fork(), a second process is created, and both processes are at this point in the code. The only way to tell if you're the new child process or the original parent process is to look at the return value of fork(). In the documentation, you can see that if fork() returns 0, you are in the child process. So basically, the then block of the ...


1

Normally, read on an empty pipe blocks until data is made available by writing to the write end of the pipe. Thus, the child process can't continue execution past this line until it receives data from the parent; it blocks waiting for it: while(read(fifoChild[0],buf,1)>0) Once it has read the string, it wakes up, reverses it, and writes it back to ...


0

Don't use __declspec(naked) since in that case the complier doesn't generate epilogue and prologue instructions and you need to generate a prologue just like compiler expects you to if you want to access the argument fastStrlen. Since you don't know what the compiler expects you should just let it generate the prologue. This means you can't just use ret to ...


1

You need to store pointers in your Sensori map in the first place. That is, it should be of type std::map<std::string,Sensor*> or better yet std::map<std::string, std::shared_ptr<Sensor>>. Prefer the second variant as it makes your life much much easier by making you not worry about memory leaks and premature freeing of objects. Your ...


0

In every Floor, you have two versions of isPassable: Floor::isPassable and Tile::isPassable. One is initialized and the other is not. You also have two versions of clip. Floor::clip is uninitialized and Tile::clip is not. So naturally when you refer to your dungeon element as a Tile, it accesses the uninitialized one and disaster strikes. The code you ...


0

You can try the following code int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { std::string username; std::string password; if(argc == 3) { username = argv[1]; password = argv[2]; } else { std::cerr << "You must specify username and password arguments!" << std::endl; return 1; } ...


3

Your code is fine. throw e; makes a copy of e, which is destroyed after the exception has been handled. The handler is given a reference to that copy. You could get in trouble if you threw a pointer to the local variable; the variable would be destroyed before handling the exception, leaving the pointer invalid. But throwing a pointer would be rather an odd ...


0

Here is a script that will do just that. Set up an automated task with cron to update the ip. #!/bin/bash # Script to write external ip to ip.txt in Dropbox folder curl icanhazip.com >> ~/Dropbox/ip.txt echo "The Ip for $HOSTNAME" >> ~/Dropbox/ip.txt date >> ~/Dropbox/ip.txt echo "" >> ~/Dropbox/ip.txt


0

Try doing this int main(int argc, char *argv[]) The argc will tell the number of arguments in the array argv. And argv is the array which contains list of all the strings passed as command line parameters Just run a loop over the array and print the values. Also this might help - What does int argc, char *argv[] mean?


1

Step 1: Create an OpenGL Context; first try by the "attrib" method requesting the minium OpenGL version you want to have. If that succeeds you're done. Step 2: If that didn't work and you can gracefully downgrade create a no-frills context and call glGetString(GL_VERSION) to get the actual context version supported. Note that on MacOS X this limits you to ...


5

You can use NAN. However The problem was the use of an uninitialized floating point variable. Unlike integers, not all bit patterns are valid for use as floating point values. There is a category of values known as signaling NaNs, or SNaN for short, which are special "not a number" values. If you ask the processor to, it will keep an eye out for ...


2

Judging by the variable name min, you would want it to be as large as possible. This way, any comparison to this value will be a smaller value, and update your minValue. float minValue = std::numeric_limits<float>::max(); P.S. don't name your variable min or you risk name shadowing issues.



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