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0

It's also possible to not use recursion at all, and instead pack expand into a std::initializer_list and then push into the queue with a loop. template<typename... Ts> void hash_queue(queue<size_t>& q){ std::initializer_list<size_t> hash_codes = {typeid(Ts).hash_code()...}; for(auto h : hash_codes) q.push( h ); } Or even ...


0

My feeling is that threads are not the answer to your problem. Two cursor state or iterator-like objects that keeps the state of the traversal backward and forward will give you the same results. Threads are a way of coordinating execution, not a way of parcelling the code. And in any case you should avoid threads as much as possible, this being a case ...


0

The problem is probably not in the code actually, at a glance it behaves normally. You declare Queue q; as a local variable in your main. This means that when the main finishes it's execution, q goes out of scope, and the destructor is called. Hope this sheds some light on the matter....


0

There's no reason for you to call GetLastError. The documentation for LVM_INSERTITEM doesn't say that you should do so. All it says is that SendMessage returns the index of the new item on success, and -1 on failure. So, check for errors by inspecting the value returned by SendMessage. The other problem is that you are not initialising all the fields of ...


0

Here is how I would do it, hope you will find it useful. The main problem is how to distinguish between enum flags and all other types. I would use an extra template type, e.g. flag_type, which would have a member value only for our enum flags: template<typename T> typename flag_type<T>::value operator | (T, T) { /* implementation */ } ...


3

for(int j=0; j<4; j++) { cout<<(int)bytes[i]; // Problem here. } You used the index i instead of j. for (int j = 0 ; j < 4 ; j++) { cout << (int)bytes[j]; // Problem solved. }


0

Solve the Problem: check / correct the paths for ATL- and MFC-Includes at: Project -> Properties -> Include Directories What might be wrong In your D:\Users[USERNAME]\AppData\Local\Microsoft\MSBuild\v4.0\Microsoft.Cpp.Win32.user.props (or other Property-Sheets), the Include Directories-Property might have been overwritten. Background-Knowledge VS6 used to ...


0

The value_type of an unordered_map<K,V> is pair<const K, V>. That's what you get when you iterate over it with a range-for. There's no operator<< overload for vectors, causing the error you see. namespace std { template<typename Container> struct hash { std::size_t operator()(Container const& v) const ...


-1

In general, I would refrain from using TABs at all. Depending on your Editor, TABs are interpreted differently in length, so when using TABs your code may look totally different from the layout point of view on a different System. Sometimes making it not a good read. Almost all good Editors have the possibility to define a Number of spaces that are inserted ...


1

You can use std::enable_if like following : template<typename T, typename... Ts> void hash_queue( queue<size_t>& q, typename std::enable_if<sizeof...(Ts)!=0 >::type* = 0 ){ hash_queue<Ts...>(q); q.push( typeid(T).hash_code() ); } See demo


3

If you enter a tab into an input, then your string will contain a literal tab character, and it will stay a tab character - it wont' be magically translated into \t internally. Same goes for writing code - you can embed literal tab characters in your strings. However, consider this: T T T <--tab stops 012345012345012345012345 foo1 = ...


2

It's completely legal to put a tab character directly into a character string or character literal. The C and C++ standards require the source character set to include a tab character, and string and character literals may contain any character in the source character set except backslash, quote or apostrophe (as appropriate) and newline. So it's portable. ...


1

You can certainly encrypt the .data section. If you wish to encrypt the entire .data section then you'd probably need to adopt the same policy as the packers do. Encrypt the entire executable. Add a stub that performs the decryption at startup, and then transfer control to the decrypted executable. But then you'd be no better off of course. The cheat engines ...


12

Yes, you can include a tab character in a string or character literal, at least according to C++11. The allowed characters include (with my emphasis): any member of the source character set except the double-quote ", backslash \, or new-line character (from C++11 standard, annex A.2) and the source character set includes: the space character, ...


2

The function error(const std::string&) throws an exception. An exception either get's caught somewhere, or it will terminate the program. In your case, the std::runtime_error thrown in error("...") doesn't get caught. Hence, the program simply terminates (it is not required to print anything once this happens, though most operation systems print a ...


0

According to the C++ Standard (12.8 Copying and moving class objects) 18 If the class definition does not explicitly declare a copy assignment operator, one is declared implicitly. If the class definition declares a move constructor or move assignment operator, the implicitly declared copy assignment operator is defined as deleted; otherwise, it is defined ...


0

How The a is copied to d ? Using the copy-assignment operator. The copy constructor is for initialisation, not assignment. In what cases we have to Overload the = operator ? When you need something other than the default behaviour of recursively copying each sub-object. In your case, the default behaviour is to simply copy the id value. That's ...


0

Copy constructors can be called during initialization: code d = a; In your code: code d; d = a; The operator= is getting called.


0

The copy constructor is not called because the implicitly-defined copy-assignment operator is called instead. It is of the form: T& T::operator=(const T&)


0

correct in correctAnswer is an array of char, so correct[SIZE] is a particular element of that array (although located past the end of the array), which you are trying to assign an array of characters to. Even if you removed [SIZE], you'd still have a problem, because you are trying to use an initializer (which, as the same suggests, is for initializing) to ...


0

I have a Linux service (daemon) that has multiple-threads and uses boost io_service listening on a TCP socket. When I receive a certain message on that socket I want to start another service with e.g. /etc/init.d/corosync start For modern Linux'es with systemd you may like to look into socket activation. That is, your main service daemon will just send ...


4

Disambiguate using a second template argument: template<typename T> void hash_queue(queue<size_t>& q){ q.push( typeid(T).hash_code() ); } template<typename T, typename U, typename... Ts> void hash_queue(queue<size_t>& q){ hash_queue<U, Ts...>(q); hash_queue<T>(q); }


0

As an alternative, you can enumerate the registry looking at the "Displayname" key for the following tokens: 'Microsoft', 'Visual', 'C++', 'Redistributable'. You can use the following to determine if the sub-key is what you're after... // search for valid tokens to indicate this is a redistributable. resToken = name.Tokenize (_T(" "), curPos); while ...


0

getChildNodes() returns all child nodes, not just the ones that are elements. The whitespace between the elements (new lines in this case) count as a text node (DOMNode::NodeType::TEXT_NODE). By my count there are actually 2 text nodes in your example, so 3 child nodes overall, though differences when transcribing into the question, or different ...


0

From http://blog.tomaka17.com/2011/07/redirecting-cerr-and-clog-to-outputdebugstring: #include <ostream> #include <Windows.h> /// \brief This class is a derivate of basic_stringbuf which will output all the written data using the OutputDebugString function template<typename TChar, typename TTraits = std::char_traits<TChar>> class ...


0

Yes this is an old question. But people do go looking for answers years later.. There's an easy way, but it's counter intuitive. Right click the excluded item, select "exclude from build", and on the dialog that appears, uncheck the builds for which you'd like the item back. Note the convenient 'Deselect All' button.


1

If you're referring to the socket descriptors themselves being inherited by exec'd child processes, and this being undesirable, then you could pass SOCK_CLOEXEC when creating the sockets with socket(2) to make sure that they are closed when you execute other programs. (This won't close the connection by the way, since your program still has a reference to ...


0

Use a container like std::vector to store your jobs. Good I/O is hard and tedious to do: For example: // container to hold jobs // remember to #include <vector> std::vector<job> myJobs; And then read them in: // read in number of jobs: // going to need #include <fstream> and <sstream> ifstream input("input.txt"); if (!input) { ...


-1

If you have to compare a source string more often with other strings one elegant solution is to use regex. std::wstring first = "Test"; std::wstring second = "TEST"; std::wregex pattern(first, std::wregex::icase); bool isEqual = std::regex_match(second, pattern);


-1

Ah, i accident create a second instance in QML, and use it. Everything work fine now :D


0

Guys I realized a strange thing. When I open VS and build for the first time, it builds successfully, but if I rebuild, it gives error. So each time I make a change in the code and compile, it gives the same errors. But if I close VS and open again and try, it works.


0

Are you on a x86 architecture? If not, the code is different: https://allthingsconfigmgr.wordpress.com/2013/12/17/visual-c-redistributables-made-simple/


7

The problem is when invoking a templated operator() (second line of main()). In your case, you need to explicitly specify the return type, as it cannot be deduced, and the correct way of doing it is: printf("Value : %d\n", apple.operator()<int>()); operator()() is a template member function that takes () as parameters. So, its name is operator(), ...


0

Under Visual Studio 2010/2012/2013 Right click on your project select Properties Expand Configuration Properties Click on the VC++ Directories Add the path to your file,as well as $(VCInstallDir)lib;, into the "Reference Directories" item


0

The first thing to note is that every number you form with all the elements of the vector has the same number of digits. That's why we can use lexicographical sorting on strings. So what we could do in a naive way is to list all posibile concatenations and select the largest from it. The string comparison used for sorting makes use of the above noted fact ...


1

Use I\O Completion Ports these allow you to scale to 100's of thousands of connections using a small number of threads. If cross platform is NOT your goal then it's best to write directly to the Windows IOCP API rather than using any of the cross platform libraries. Note that I have some articles and some code you can download here explains how to use ...


0

The general approach for such tasks is to use member function erase along with standard algorithm std::remove_if declared in header <algorithm> For example #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <algorithm> #include <cctype> int main() { std::string s = "9-=p98u;iu8y76"; std::cout << s << ...


0

If the WSARecv() call is in progress when the FIN arrives then you will get a successful completion with lpNumberOfBytesRecvd set to 0. If the WSARecv() call is initiated after the FIN arrives then you will get a WSAESHUTDOWN error from the WSARecv() call.


0

The reason this does nothing is because you have no transformation matrices setup. Right now you are drawing in a coordinate space known as Normalized Device Coordinates, which has the viewing volume encompass the range [-1.0, 1.0] in all directions. Any point existing outside that range is clipped. Vertices specified with glVertex2f (...) are implicitly ...


2

The problem is the way your are trying to extend the string y. Indexing can be applied only in the domain of the string (i.e. you cannot index beyond the length of the string) change y[t++] = g[i] to y += g[i] Additionally, i would like to mention that you don't need the else branch. When execution reaches the end of loop scope, it will "automatically" ...


0

If you haven't specified a projection matrix then the standard one will be an orthographic (non-perspective) projection with left-right top-bottom and near-far all being -1,1. So translating outside that will make the vertices not draw at all.


1

This is reasonably expressed by the standard library. Something like auto digit_or_alpha = [](char c){ return isdigit(c) || isalpha(c); }; std::copy_if(g.begin(), g.end(), std::back_inserter(y), digit_or_alpha ); Should work. back_inserter is in <iterator>. Angew provides the reason why yours doesn't work.


1

The problem is that the size of y is 0, it's empty. Accessing its elements (using y[t++]) therefore reaches "after" the string—it's buffer overflow, and Undefined Behaviour. You need to extend y. To do this with minimal changes to your code, you'd do this: string g = "9-=p98u;iu8y76"; string y; for (int i = 0; i < g.length(); i++) { if ...


0

int main() { int x = 10, y = 10; y = (x + y)-y; } Solved a little bit but not completely but solved if you use this code int swap(int *x, int y){ *x = (*x + *y) - *x; return 0; } int main() { int x = 10; int y = 5; y = (x + y) - y + swap(&x, &y); cout << x << endl << y << endl; }


1

Static library is a collection of object modules. Any subset of modules may be linked into the resulting application (if all dependencies are resolved). Unlike the static, the shared library is loaded into application's space as one entity. Shared libraries are loaded by OS, so they must have a special format recognized by system utilities/kernel. Static ...


1

So I see lots of answers talking about why you would want to use shared libraries instead of static libraries, but I think your question is why they are even distinct things nowadays, i.e. why isn't it possible to use a shared library as a static library and pull what you need out of it at build time? Here are some reasons. Some of these are historical - ...


4

Notice that stops is not a pointer, it's an array (of 10 pointers to bus_stop, but that's irrelevant). Arrays are not pointers. There is an implicit conversion from array to pointer to first element of the array which happens when you pass e.g. an array of char to a function expecting a char * parameter. But that conversion only happens when required. If a ...


1

In you program, you read words and print them. Just add a counter there. int wordcount = 0; while( sampleFile >> str){ ++wordcount; cout << str; } To count the letters, your code is first reading all the strings and counting letters only from the last string. You should rather re-write it as: int x = 0; while( sampleFile >> str){ ...


1

I take it you want to count the words in the file (as opposed to the letters). Currently, it looks to me like you're counting the number of letters in the last word. The reason is that you seem to be assuming that sampleFile >> str loads the entire contents of the file into str. It doesn't, actually - it only fetches the first word. (I think a word ...


0

Yes You can do this by sending the variable by reference.And send variable to that particular function in which you want to access. **void CClassX::MyFunction1() { int x = 8; CClassY::MyFunction2(x) } void CClassY::MyFunction2(int &x) { x; //utilize x in some way for(int i; i<x; i++) {} }



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