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0

It's a rounding error. Trig functions are implemented as mathematical series which are approximated on the computational level which causes for number very close to zero for example 6.12303e-17 rather than the expected 0.


0

6.12303e-17, to take an example, represents the value 6.12303*10-17, or 0.00000000000000000612303. The reason you obtain this value as result is that you did not apply cos to π/2, which is not representable as a double anyway (it's irrational).


0

The "strange values" you are getting are (effectively) zero. All of them are smaller than 10^(-15), which is 0.000000000000001. The reason your code isn't giving exactly 0 is due to floating point error. Related reading can be found here.


0

I have something very similiar... This approach DOES NOT treat the padding of the BMP format. So You can only make bitmaps with width multiple of 4. This is NOT a monochromatic bitmap. It's a RGB format, but you can tune it easily. This is NOT an exactly answer to you, but for sure may be useful for you. Enjoy it. void createBitmap( byte * imageData, ...


0

This does not appear to be a bug, but the correct behavior of the generated default constructor, yielding an int with an unspecified value. In the second and third cases wrapper is an aggregate, and an aggregate with an initializer-list that doesn't have enough for all members of the aggregate will zero-initialize the rest. For ints this means no ...


1

The entire purpose of an upgradeable lock is that you can atomically upgrade it to an exclusive lock. If you could do that with a shared lock, what purpose would upgradeable locks serve? If you had an unlock_shared_and_lock, what would happen if two threads called it at the same time? Under what circumstances would it be safe to call? If you might need to ...


2

The problem is that since Value doesn't have a destructor, the default destructor is created for you. Since it ends up being defined inline, in the class definition, you end up deleting an incomplete type. In other words, it is as if you had written this in your header file: class Value { SharedPointer< Array > _pa; ~Value() { //This will end ...


0

Visual Studio even now does not support all of C++11; VS2010 supported very little of it. Support for initialiser lists was added in VS2013. I strongly recommend bookmarking that MSDN page if you're going to be learning C++11 on Windows. Sadly, the real world still has some way to go before it catches up to the books.


0

During value-initialization, if T is a class type without a user-provided or deleted default-constructor, then the object is zero-initialized (§8.5/8.2). This is indeed the case with wrapper. Your first example matches the third case for zero-initialization (§8.5/6.1, emphasis mine) — if T is a scalar type (3.9), the object is initialized to the ...


0

the list initialisation is introduced on C++11. Your compiler should be C++11 Compliant to compile your code. You had to use the VS 2012 or later to use list uniform initialisation successfully.


0

As stated in the comments, initializer lists is a new feature of the C++11 standard. Vector initialization using initializer list therefore requires a compiler/platform that supports some C++11 features. MSVC supports initailizer lists from C++11 since the Visual Studio 2013 version. See for minimum Visual Studio version for different C++11 features.


2

This type of initialization is supported only in C++11, which VS 2010 does not support. You can replace it with old-style initialization. Unfortunately, it would use an extra array, but at least you would be able to get past this point in building your project: int vectorData[] = {5, 7, 9, 4, 6, 8}; vector<int> v(vectorData, vectorData+6); Demo.


0

when number become less than 1 you leave the inner while loop. then after the display you should do a break to leave the for loop. unless that you will loop infinetly as number will be alaways less that 14.


0

according to your first code, number is "1" when it exit from while loop. so at the end of "for" loop we have number equals "1" and its not smaller than "14" and the compiler will not exit from for loop any time. I think this code works correctly: for (int number = 13; number != 2; number = number + 1){ cout << "\nFOR THIS NUMBER : " ...


1

You should change your if to if (i % 4 == 3)


2

extern is redundant for functions, so it is pointless to declare a function extern inline. If, for example you declared a function inline at global scope, the rules of this section would apply. Likewise if you declared a class at global scope and defined a member function within the class definition, as such a function would be implicitly inline. The ...


0

Never mind, turns out that taking some time out and thinking about the symptoms suggested the answer. Turns out a terrible library I'm using can throw an exception during cleanup, so I was getting an exception within an exception during stack unwinding. I should have realised that when handlers further up the call stack behaved properly. Duh.


0

The question here is what you want to achieve. If assert() fits your purpose in C, you can use that in code called from Julia as well. Note that your julia session will be aborted if an error occurs, but if it is to indicate a programming error in your C code, that is probably totally fine. If you want your Julia code to be able to programmatically handle ...


-1

Try this (ALL of it is written in C except for the "thread" which is C++11.. I did this so that it can be cross-platform): Includes: Socket.h: #ifndef SOCKET_H_INCLUDED #define SOCKET_H_INCLUDED #if defined _WIN32 || defined _WIN64 #include <winsock2.h> #include <ws2tcpip.h> #include <windows.h> #else #include <unistd.h> #include ...


0

When your number becomes 2, it falls in infinite loop. number 2 becomes 1 in 2nd if block. then it becomes 2 again by "number = number + 1". then becomes 1 again by "number = number / 2" in 2nd if block So, all you need to break.. when number is 2


0

Write an array view class. It takes a type T and exposes T* iterstors via T* begin() const and T* end() const. It has an T& operator[](size_t)const that lets you do random access. And size, front, back, empty while you are st it. For ctors, it has pointer-and-pointer, pointer-and-size, C array, std::array<T,N> snd std::vector<T,A>&. ...


0

Maybe look at tuple_element::type?


0

In deed Your program leaks. This is due to std::vector of Spaceship* in your code. an STL vector container will manage and free it's internal memory only when it contains objects not pointer to objects. Here when you add Spaceship to your vector and did delete alpha will not release the memory pointed by sp1 and sp2 in your main program. In modern C++ you ...


2

There's no way in C or even C++ to programmatically get the names or types of the current function's arguments, nor the current function itself. The closest thing they let you get is __func__, which is merely a string representation of the name of the current function. So you're going to have to capture the parameters' names somewhere so that you can use ...


0

It took me a little while to see it. The problem is - ultimately - with the fact that[1] (qi::char_('\\') >> qi::char_) | (qi::char_ - '"') synthesizes to boost::variant< boost::fusion::vector2<char, char>, char> and not, as you likely expected char or std::vector<char>. The attribute compatibility rules of Spirit are ...


2

You ignore the return value of recv until after you send REPLY, so no matter what happens, you send REPLY followed by the contents of the buffer. After you echo the first time, something happens, and no matter what it is, you send REPLY. Bluntly, it doesn't look like you understand the very basics of TCP. We used to have a rule that before anyone can do ...


0

No. C++ meta-programming power is weak don't include any form of reflection. You can however use tools like gcc-xml to parse a C++ program and export its content in a easier to analyze format. Writing your own parser for C++ to extract function declaration is going to be a nightmare unless you only need to do that on your specific project and you're ready ...


2

C and C++ have no way to gather the names of all the functions available. However, you can use macros to test standards (ANSI, ISO, POSIX, etc) compliance, which can then be used to guarantee the presence of each standard's functions. For example, if _POSIX_C_SOURCE is defined, you can (usually) assume that functions specified by POSIX will be available: ...


3

In C++ you can define a global allocator: void *operator new(size_t sz); void *operator new[](size_t sz); void operator delete(void *p); void operator delete[](void *p); and the same for non-throwing versions. These functions will be called each time you require memory from the heap using new for instances or arrays. What you can do is create a module ...


2

You can use OS (presumably, Linux-based one) to help you to crash your program once it consumes too much memory. There's an answer on another StackExchange network site about Limit memory usage for a single Linux process. Then you can use debugger to trace point of failure.


3

You can avoid the overhead of having to maintain a class by using: template <typename T> using Row = std::vector<T>; and using Row in the definition of Matrix. template <typename T> class Matrix { public: Matrix(std::size_t n, std::size_t m, const T& value = T()): value(n, Row<T>(m, value)) { } // irrelevant ...


-1

According to O'Reilly "C++ In A Nutshell" (2003), An array is specified with a constant size in square brackets Since your variable n is not a constant, it can't be used to specify the size of the array. The same paragraph also says, For an array-like container whose size can change at runtime, see <vector> in Chapter 13. Sorry, but you are not ...


4

The language doesn't support reflection yet. However, since you are looking for some sources of information, take a look at the Boost.Reflect library to help you add reflection to your code, to a certain extent. Also, look at ClangTooling and libclang for libraries that let you do automated code-analysis.


1

I know I can create a class ConstRow that will have absolutely same functionality except that it'll get/return const refs but is it possible to workaround this nicely without creating a new class There's no workaround; that's your only option (or at least the only option that's not more trouble than it's worth). Consider that even the standard library ...


0

#include <iostream> using namespace std; string sumBinary (string s1, string s2); int main() { cout << "output = "<< sumBinary ("10","10"); } string sumBinary (string s1, string s2) { if (s1.empty()) return s2; if (s2.empty()) return s1; int len1 = s1.length() -1; int len2 = s2.length() -1; string s3; s3 = len1 ...


0

The application code is responsible for demultiplexing. At a high-level, there are two options: Use a single endpoint to conceptually function as an acceptor. Upon receiving a handshake message, the client would instantiate a new local endpoint, and inform the client to use the newly constructed endpoint for the remainder of the client's session. This ...


0

If you are working with Unix/Linux, you can (probably) construct IP sockets using the socket(AF_INET, SOCK_RAW, protocol); where protocol is either 0 or some number which doesn't conflict with any standard protocol number (see the list of protocol numbers). SOCK_RAW is an optional POSIX functionality but it's pretty common; both Linux and FreeBSD have ...


0

You are using double quotes “ which are not recognized by compiler use " The below code will work. #include <iostream> int main() { char name[50]; char quest[80]; char velocity[80]; std::cout << "\nWhat is your name? "; std::cin.getline(name, 49); std::cout << "\nWhat is your quest?"; std::cin.getline(quest, 79); ...


0

Your code doesn't follow the specs for input format. fin >> giver; // dave fin >> giveAway; // gives away 200 fin >> numReceivers; // to 3 receivers for (int j=0; j<numReceivers; j++) { if (giver == groupPeople[j]) // if dave was 4th in the list then what? { bankAcct[j] -= giveAway; if (numReceivers ...


0

2 things are there You did not added the void when defining the class function login outside the class. Second that when you are calling login function you are missing () Here is the right code. #include <iostream> using namespace std; class Password_Program { private: string password; public: Password_Program(); void login(); ...


4

glTranslatef changes the MVP matrix which gets passed as a uniform into the vertex shader. There is a shortcut in pre 150 by using gl_Position = ftransform(); Which applies the transformation matrices to the input position as it was passed in with glVertex*. However glsl 150 core doesn't allow using that uniform or that function. Instead create a matrix ...


0

For future reference, the docs state that the default type for textFormat is Qt::AutoText. The docs further state that Qt::AutoText is interpreted as Qt::RichText if Qt::mightBeRichText() returns true, otherwise as Qt::PlainText. Finally, mightBeRichText uses a fast and therefore simple heuristic. It mainly checks whether there is something that looks like a ...


0

You should not try to swap the values that were given to you, but rather let the library and the user provide the correct way of swapping values for the type you are interested in: using std::swap; swap(a,b); The implementation makes use of a using-declaration to bring std::swap into scope and then uses an unqualified call to swap that will find the ...


2

You forgot the return type in the definition of Password_Program::login(). Change Password_Program::login() {....} to void Password_Program::login() {....}


5

Your definition of the login() method is missing a return type. It should be: void Password_Program::login() { ... } You've also forgotten brackets when calling it: myPassword.login();


0

I noticed that you were not checking the error code on pj_transform, so I caught it and checked it myself. It was returning -14. Negative return codes usually indicate errors. Some digging in the PROJ.4 documentation revealed that the pj_strerrno function returns the error message associated with an error code. Accordingly, I used the function and ...


4

This is not a simple question. In the general case, in C++ you would document your contract stating that the behavior is undefined unless the container is non-empty. The implication is that a call out of context can cause any possible behavior. The use of noexcept in such interfaces then limits what the range of any possible behavior is: it is any possible ...


-1

You may find the following links helpful: How To Automate Outlook Using Visual C++/MFC How to automate Outlook 2010 by using C++ in Visual Studio 2010 together with MFC C++ app automates Outlook (CppAutomateOutlook)


0

The file has been written in little endian byte order. Your machine uses big endian byte order. Or vice versa. The obvious solution is to reverse the byte order when reading and writing. There are many questions here that cover that. More deeply you might consider whether or not the file should be written using machine byte order, if indeed it is. A common ...


1

One way to start would be to narrow down which class is causing the fault. Does it work if they are all Beginner, or if they are all Intermediate? If so then the other one is causing the problem.



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