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0

When you installed the OpenCV 3 with visual studio 2013, you will find the dlls in \opencv\msvc\bin\Release for the release mode and the include in \opencv\build\include, therefore invoke the command prompt and type cl /EHsc main.cpp /Fetest.exe /I D:\CPP_Libraries\opencv_3.0.0\build\include /link /LIBPATH:D:\CPP_Libraries\opencv_3.0.0\msvc\lib\Release ...


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It looks like somewhere along the way the debug information is getting lost. One possibility is that your CFLAGS are getting reset before you get to building the .o files you care about, so the .o files don't have debug info. One easy way to check that is run $ otool -l my_file.o | grep debug_info sectname __debug_info If you don't see that "sectname" ...


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In light of new information, the problem is with your boost::bind. You are trying to call a member function without an object to call it on: you are trying to call ProcessData but you haven't told the bind on which object you wish to call it on. You need to give it a Manager to call it on: _workerService->post(boost::bind(&Manager::ProcessData, this, ...


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Figured it out, 1 more hour was necessary :D "id" column in database has auto incrementation which collided with tableWidget data even if they were equal. Never try to INSERT data column that has autoincrementation on.


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Ok, I got it. The following converter does the job: struct dcomplex_to_python_object { static PyObject* convert(dcomplex const& comp) { PyObject* result; if(std::abs(comp.im())<=std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon()){ result=PyFloat_FromDouble(comp.re()); } else{ ...


1

Deleting the file removes its reference from the filesystem. But file descriptor is another reference. As long as there is any reference, the file is not actually destroyed so no change to the file data that can be reported to the polling happened. (The file can also be hardlinked, that is another reference whose deletion would not be reported to you.) You ...


0

cdb allows 3 different commands to set breakpoints: bp, bm, and bu bp accepts arguments that are numeric addresses bm accepts arguments that are textual symbols in a module that is already loaded bu accepts arguments that are textual symbols in modules that may or may not be loaded yet. To Set a breakpoint at main we can guess Image00390000 is actually ...


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Sorry, but your program is annoying me and it is a little hard to read. Try this: struct Position { int x; int y; }; struct Direction_Vector : Position { unsigned int direction; }; const unsigned int MAX_DIRS = 4u; void movement(char command, const Direction_Vector present_dir, Direction_Vector& new_dir) { ...


1

The problem with this: cout << (stringstream() << "my string").str() << endl; It is that the expression stringstream() << "my string" returns a std::ostream& object, not a std::stringstream. You can rectify this by defining some appropriate overloads: template<typename Type> std::stringstream& ...


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I followed following steps and it worked. 1) I uninstalled the opencv libary. 2) Downloaded the version 2.4.10 3) Installed the dependencies as shown in http://robotics.jacobs-university.de/TMP/kaustubh/vision/install_opencv_latest.txt 3) Then followed both the approaches described in http://www.aichengxu.com/view/52596 (It is in Chinese, google ...


0

Just make a class template where the class you're keeping pointers to is a template argument: template <typename Cls> class Foo { typedef int(Cls::*getInfoInterface1_t)(void); std::vector<getInfoInterface1_t> ifcs; // ... }; That way, for each class type, you just choose the right template: Foo<interface1> ...


6

The operator<< is not defined for std::stringstream, but for its base class std::ostream, hence it does not return a reference to the std::stringstream and therefore the method str() (which is a method of std::stringstream) is not found. Technically, the above is actually std::basic_stringstream<CharT,Traits> and ...


0

If you want to do this with functions with variable argument lists, there is no way to do this directly. You cannot pass a variable argument list to another function with a variable argument list. Instead you can declare a function with a parameter of type va_list, use va_start and va_end in the functions with variable argument list to create a va_list, ...


1

If the first is definied outside a function, it is going to be stored in the DATA segment. If it's defined in a function, it is going to be stored on the stack. With the second (the pointer itself) it's the same, but the object the pointer is pointing to is going to be allocated on the heap.


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One possible solution could be to have getValue return an internal class instance, which can be converted to a double. Something like this: class helper { public: class helper_internal_class { friend class helper; public: operator double() const { return foo(); } private: ...


2

"Where are the variables stored" is usually the wrong question. It varies between platforms and the language is designed to provide an abstraction over such details anyway. Example 1 creates a Rectangle object with static storage duration. It will normally be destroyed automatically after main returns. Example 2 creates a Rectangle object with dynamic ...


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@Steven approach is really good but you can also replace your input to char array instead of int and use cin::getline function. int main() { int digits; int count = 0; char sInput[100]; cout << "Enter upper limit: "; cin.getline(sInput, sizeof(sInput)); int nLen = strlen(sInput); for (int i = 0; i < nLen; i++) { ...


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Where the variables "get stored" is implementation defined, and is not in the scope of the C++ standard, except as to the specific semantics of their scope. Assuming that both declarations are statically-scoped, in both cases 'rect' will be stored at the static scope. In the second case, rect will refer to a heap-allocated object, and throughout the ...


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There are no memory leaks because: The std::vector<T> has value type semantics: Destructs the container. The destructors of the elements are called and the used storage is deallocated. Note, that if the elements are pointers, the pointed-to objects are not destroyed. -- std::vector::~vector, C++ reference. The std::vector<T> is used ...


2

Yes, create a class/struct Params that contains all the parameters as members. Have your static function accept an instance of Params instead of all your parameters. Your code will look like: struct Params { const CString &a; const CString &b; const CString &c; ... } class helper { public: static double getValue(const Params & ...


1

g++ by default invokes the linker (ld) as soon as it has finished compiling all the input files. There are many ways to produce the binary executable, but the two most common are: Include all source files in a single g++ command. You would need to add GraphData.cpp and main.cpp to the same call to g++. This method ensures the linker has access to all the ...


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Some of it is purely aesthetic. Having a smaller distributable size can be sexy, even if it is not necessarily a real practical benefit for a given platform. Your example also isn't necessarily revealing code bloat. Excessive inlining and loop unrolling will bloat things up a lot quicker. The same applies if you start doing massive number of instantiations ...


1

[Note: This isn't an answer to the question, it's just an explanation on how to compile multiple files one by one] You can compile the source files separately, but then you have to tell g++ to create object files, which you then link together. Something like this: $ g++ -Wall -g -c -I../include -I/usr/include/Snap-2.3/snap-core ...


0

Improving performance for the codes like yours is "well explored" and still popular area. Take a look at dot-product (perfect link provided by Z Boson already) or at some (D)AXPY optimization discussions (http://scicomp.stackexchange.com/questions/1932/are-daxpy-dcopy-dscal-overkills) In general , key topics to explore and consider applying are: AVX2 ...


1

In the C and C++ languages, library functions are usually written in C or C++, then compiled. It is also used to test out the compilers. Some compiler vendors may write libraries in assembly language (after compiling in high level language), for performance or space reasons. A classic example is the memcpy function. It would be written in assembly to ...


2

You loop while (i < s) will never exit, as you don't modify either i nor s in the loop. You can actually make the function a little simpler, first of all by not having a loop (that's what the recursion is for), then realizing you only need the size and the current index as arguments. Then you could make it like int nonzeroes(double* digits, size_t size, ...


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I may be wrong but to use recursion you need a base case, to stop the calls, and i don't think you need to pass count either. I think one option could be this: int nonzeros(double digits[], int s, int i) { if (i == s) { return 0; } else if (digits[i] != 0.0) { return (1 + nonzeros(digits, s, i + 1)); } else ...


0

My brain is fried, so I won't give you the code for shifting. I'll be nice and supply you with a methodology. A "shift" is where you replace the value in a previous slot with the value in the next slot: 0 1 2 3 +---+---+---+---+ | c | o | a | l | +---+---+---+---+ To shift delete the 'o' at position 1, the letter's following, in ...


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There are at least three solutions paths: Try to squeeze the situation into the CPropertySheet + CPropertyPage framework which does not naturally allow for additional dialog controls on the CPropertySheet object, and so you will get no framework support this Place a tab control on an ordinary dialog, and then use the TCN_SELCHANGE messages to fire code ...


3

Double are represented as m*2^e where m is the mantissa and e is the exponent. Doubles have 11 bits for the exponent. Since the exponent can be negative there is an offset of 1024. That means that the real calculation is m*2^(e-1024). The largest 11 bit number is 2047. This means the largest double is m*2^(2047-1024) = m*2^(1023). The mantissa is a number ...


1

DBL_MAX is the largest value a double can hold. Its value is not related to the number of bits in the mantissa. The limit is mostly related to the maximum exponent. For IEEE-754, it is about 1.8e+308 or 2^1023. The definition is usually #define DBL_MAX 1.79769313486231470e+308


5

Format the integer into a string. Then, test the string for the required characters. Bonus approach (integer-only): You could use logarithms, division, modulus, subtraction, etc to iterate through and test each digit.


1

The problem is that your variable is a vector of a vector of strings: vector<vector<string>> sudoku_; When you call find, you are searching for a string, so you should call it on a simple vector<string>, not on a nested data type. So you must first find the right item in the "external" vector, and then you can use your code on the ...


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I'm adding this answer mostly for a full explanation of the solution, and for anyone else that finds it with a similar problem. I went with TartanLlama's method of a mixin-like system. Each ability gets it's own class, and the life-form inherits all of the abilities it needs. However, there was still the problem that the abilities needed to be able to ...


0

a dynamic library (.dll in windows) is exactly like an executable file(.exe in windows) in fact the both are in the same file format ,PE format (portable executable) the different is that the dynamic library doesn't "start" the execution by it's own ( you usually don't include an entry point in it's file) so a dynamic library is exactly like an exe (both ...


0

That coding standard to return an error code with every function/method really, really sucks for C++. If you can find a way to persuade otherwise diplomatically, I would suggest trying. You can use thread-local storage to set and retrieve global errors efficiently on a per-thread basis that you can poll any time. You also have exception-handling in C++ and ...


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Overload resolution occurs in the following steps: A set of candidate functions is assembled. This set of candidates consists of both non-template functions and specializations of function templates. If template parameter deduction fails on a function template, it's silently removed from the set of candidates. A subset of candidate functions are determined ...


3

You have two problems: Your freeFunction returns void instead of void *. You are passing the return value of freeFunction(freeAbc) into setValue instead of a pointer to the function itself.


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My guess after looking at above images is that the images which you have captured are too difficult to infer reliable matching. As you may know, stitching consists of: Finding keypoints Matching keypoints by calculating distance between its corresponding descriptors Some outlier detection process like RANSAC Once you get matched keypoints, get ...


1

I've run into similar problems on 32-bit systems (especially MIPS) running large application programs with hundreds of threads. Large default stacks don't tie up physical memory, but virtual memory can be a scarce resource as well. There are a couple of ways to resolve the problem: Use setrlimit from within the program. I haven't done this but I suspect it ...


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freeFunction returns void*, but setvalue wants a function that returns void. They are clearly not the same type. Also you're passing the return value of freeFunction to setvalue, but setvalue expects a function pointer.


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Your function should return void not void *. static void freeFunction(void *freeAbc) { ... } The (*) indicates that setvalue's parameter is a function pointer. It's not part of that function's return type. (void (*)(void *) ^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^ || | || || | ++ parameter types || | || + function pointer || ++ return type Also, ...


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To run the sample, you need the following libs -lopencv_core -lopencv_highgui -lopencv_features2d -lopencv_nonfree -lopencv_flann -lopencv_calib3d Now you need to tell the compiler where are the header files, therefore -I/.../opencv-2.4.10/install/include Now you need to tell the linker where are the lib files, therefore ...


1

The code argument to Rcpp's cppFunction must include valid C++ code. The library tries to make as seamless as possible, but is still restricted to the syntax of C++. More specifically, C++ does not have a range operator (:) and correspondingly the C++ compiler tells you that the indexing expression must be a valid index (enclosed within [], without the :). ...


0

If you are writing for a CPU that has no multiply instruction (such CPUs do exist), and if you have to compute 613*x + 725*y many times, then it might be worthwhile writing custom bit-shifting code. But you would probably have to write it in assembly language to make it faster than the compiler's built-in multiply function.


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Your compiler doesn't fully implement C++11. Starting with GCC 4.9.0, your code will compile correctly. [5:25pm][wlynch@apple /tmp] /opt/gcc/4.9.0/bin/g++ -std=c++11 -c red.cc [5:25pm][wlynch@apple /tmp] And by the way, the Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example for this would be: int main() { std::list<unsigned int> l; ...


0

For anyone who is having this issue; I have found a fix for myself. You'll need to manually edit the project file (.vcxproj file). You'll find this line: <Import Project="$(VCTargetsPath)\Microsoft.Cpp.props" /> Move the property group that contains the OutDir definition right below that line, as in the following: <Import ...


0

You need to allocate memory for child->children[20]. You allocated memory for child->children but not for the elements in the array. You can do this as follows: for (int i=0;i<100;++i) { child->children[i] = new node; } By storing a node * you are storing the address of a node which contains the address of an array of addresses of nodes. ...


0

This defining of macros seems to work for very small trivial programs however, it does not work well for large programs. In particular, some other file in the include path can incidentally include boost/thread.hpp or boost/thread/future.hpp. This can even come from an include in a third party library. As a result it breaks the usage of the macros as the ...


0

atoi() expects a const char*, which maps to a c string as an argument, you're passing a simple char. Thus the error, const char* represents a pointer, which is not compatible with a char. Looks like you need to convert only one character to a numeric value, and in this case you can replace atoi(c) by c-'0', which will give you a number between 0 and 9. ...



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