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I would write the second form as: template<typename T> auto foo(T a, T b, ...) -> decltype( a+=b, void() ) { a += b; } The deduced type for decltype(a+=b, void()) would be just void if the expression a+=b is valid, else it would result SFINAE. Well, even in the first form, I would use the trailing-return type approach.


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Adding this main() function: int main() { int x = 1, y = 2; foo( x, y ); } This is what the compiler error is: main.cpp: In function int main(): main.cpp:15:15: error: no matching function for call to foo(int&, int&) foo( x, y ); ^ main.cpp:15:15: note: candidate is: main.cpp:7:6: note: template<class T, class ...


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When you use the mfc the windows headers are all included with the afxwin.h or afx.h headers. Also never include windows.h by yourselfin a MFC project. Also never include windef.h, always include windows.h, no other header.


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Here's how to use a stringstream to extract the junkword while ignoring any space before or after (using std::ws), then get the rest of the sentence, with robust error handling.... std::string sentence{"Hello how are you."}; std::stringstream ss{sentence}; std::string junkWord; if (ss >> junkWord >> std::ws && std::getline(ss, sentence, ...


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You can do this with the standard library functions you describe. Test both whether any elements are true, and whether any elements are false, then combine the results according to this table: any true | none true ====================== any false | mixed | all false | none false | all true | empty |


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You can use if...else : cout << "Welcome to the Guessing Game!" << endl; cout << "Enter a 2 to play Game 1 or a 3 to play Game 2. Or enter 4 to quit." << endl; cin >> num; if (num == 2) {//game1 } else if(num==3) {//game2 } else if(num==4) {return 0; }else { cout<<"Invalid choice!"; system("pause"); return 1; ...


0

The way you are doing it seems right to me except the position part: position.x = sin(horizontal_angle - 3.14f/2.0f); position.y = 0.0f; position.z = cos(horizontal_angle - 3.14f/2.0f); it should be like that: vector right_vector = crossProduct(direction_vector, vector(0, 1, 0)); // maybe crossProduct(vector(0, 1, 0), direction_vector) float speed = 3; ...


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The main problem is the missing activity object which is given to you via the android_app structure in your main if you make a pure NDK solution. If you only want to make a library which can used by a Java developer, you have no access to the main-activity without given to you by a call. Or, to be more precise, I did not found a way to get the main-activity ...


0

Make the two games two distinct functions (each with its own local variables), create a third one that is a loop that prompts for the games (and break when "quit" is selected), and call the corresponding function, then call the third one from main.


1

Your program exhibits undefined behavior, because the pointers inside the main function are not initialized. When you pass them to the initialiseSDL function you pass them by value, meaning they are copied and the function only operates on the copies and not the original pointers, which will still be uninitialized after the call. What you need to do is to ...


0

One liner: std::string subStr = sentence.substr(sentence.find_first_not_of(" \t\r\n", sentence.find_first_of(" \t\r\n", sentence.find_first_not_of(" \t\r\n")))); working example: #include <iostream> #include <string> void main() { std::string sentence{ "Hello how are you." }; char whiteSpaces[] = " \t\r\n"; std::string subStr = ...


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There is apparently an official port of SQLite to NaCl here: https://code.google.com/p/naclports/source/browse/trunk/src/libraries/sqlite/?r=921


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Rather than check whether the key is present, and insert it only if not found, you can simplify the code by just inserting the item, and then checking the return value to see if the insertion succeeded (which it won't if that key was already present). void Journal::set_id(int id){ if (!(join.insert(std::make_pair(id, name)).second)) ...


0

str=str.substr(str.find_first_of(" \t")+1); Tested: string sentence="Hello how are you."; cout<<"Before:"<<sentence<<endl; sentence=sentence.substr(sentence.find_first_of(" \t")+1); cout<<"After:"<<sentence<<endl; Execution: > ./a.out Before:Hello how are you. After:how are you. Assumption is the line does not ...


0

Christian from Qt team fixed this... See https://bugreports.qt-project.org/browse/QTBUG-41395 The fix is to replace activity.callObjectMethod("startActivity","(Landroid/content/Intent;)V",intent.object<jobject>()); by activity.callMethod<void>("startActivity","(Landroid/content/Intent;)V",intent.object<jobject>()); As startActivity ...


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If you're just targeting one platform and you're not planning to interop with anything then I wouldn't worry about things. However, if you want your code to compile on a variety of platforms (OSX, Linux, Windows) then I'd go with the types defined in cstdint. Also, if you're planning to interop with other languages that have well defined sizes (eg int is ...


0

Instead of #pragma once, I suggest you to use internal #define guards: #ifndef _FOO_H_ #define _FOO_H_ /* … */ #endif /* _FOO_H_ */


2

Try the following #include <iostream> #include <string> int main() { std::string sentence{"Hello how are you."}; std::string::size_type n = 0; n = sentence.find_first_not_of( " \t", n ); n = sentence.find_first_of( " \t", n ); sentence.erase( 0, sentence.find_first_not_of( " \t", n ) ); std::cout << '\"' ...


0

Ok, after more testing I've realized that actually the way to go is cv::threshold (input, threshNear, 70, 255, CV_THRESH_BINARY_INV); the problem with the code I posted in my question looks like to be related with the threshold value I was trying to use (230 on 255). If I use a lower value (like for example 70 on 255) the color inversion actually works. ...


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I suggest you to use fixed size integers, so you prevent overflowing. If it is not available on some platform, the compiler will complain (and a compilation error is much better than a runtime error).


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There are countless ways to do this. I think I would go with this: #include <iostream> #include <string> int main() { std::string sentence{"Hello how are you."}; // First, find the index for the first space: auto first_space = sentence.find(' '); // The part of the string we want to keep // starts at the index after the ...


0

You can for example take the remaining substring string sentence{"Hello how are you."}; stringstream ss{sentence}; string junkWord; ss >> junkWord; cout<<sentence.substr(junkWord.length()+1); //string::substr However, it also depends what you want to do further


0

You could use string::find() to locate the first space. Once you have its index, then get the sub string with string::substr() from the index after the index of the space up to the end of the string.


1

You've got two options. First, pass the vector as a reference: string input = "someValue"; vector<customObjects> v; function_being_called(input, v); void function_being_called(string input, vector<customObjects> &v) { // Whatever } Or, if you're using C++11 just return a vector and let the move constructor take care of it: string input ...


0

SDL_Window *window is a local variable in the int main(int argc, char** argv) function. It will not be visible outside of main unless you either make it a global variable (not nice) or make it a member of a class which you create an instance of. Alternatively you could pass the pointer to the SDL_Window to the functions which you need it in. I noticed you ...


2

If Foo(int) is explicit, then this won't compile also: Foo foo = 42; So for "people who have been used to the form with = for decades" it won't be a surprise that the form with {} doesn't compile either.


0

Your char array is only 15 chars long. So this line goes out of bounds: for(int i = 0; i<=15; i++) If i is equal to 15 that's one too many because your array counts from 0 to 14. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 <= count them! There are 15 places starting at 0 ending at 14 Also when strings are stored in memory they have to be terminated by a ...


1

widget w = {x}; This is called “copy list initialization.” It means the same as widget w{x}; except that explicit constructors cannot be used. It’s guaranteed that only a single constructor is called. From http://herbsutter.com/2013/05/09/gotw-1-solution/ See the rest of the article for a more detailed discussion on the various ways you can ...


2

I can't explain the rationale behind this, but I can repeat the obvious. I found this surprising. Is it really the intention of the C++11 standard that this code doesn't compile? §13.3.1.7 In copy-list-initialization, if an explicit constructor is chosen, the initialization is ill-formed. Removing the = fixes it: Foo foo { 42 }; but I ...


1

This conversion operator operator ObjectType *() const { return m_Pointer; } allows implicit conversion to a pointer type, which can in turn be converted to bool. While it works, this is generally regarded as a bad idea: if you're not careful you can accidentally store a non-smart pointer, liable to be invalidated when the smart pointer ...


2

It should be like this: int calling_function() { string input = "someValue"; vector<customObjects> v; function_being_called(input,&v); // access the vector here... } void function_being_called(string input, vector<customObjects>* v) { v->push_back(myObj); }


0

Simply use SendMessage either with a WM_APP message you defined or a registered window message. Thee is no mystique doing that. If the dialog is modeless and is open and the message pump is running you can click on a check box. You get a WM_COMMAND message into the dialog proc handler of the modeless dialog. Now just use SendMessage or PostMessage (whatever ...


0

The following statement from the signal(2) manpage answers your question: During an execve(2), the dispositions of handled signals are reset to the default; the dispositions of ignored signals are feft unchanged. If another words, you can only set signals to be ignored in an arbitrary process and only if the arbitrary process does not override that by ...


1

The printf function has no knowledge of the type you actaully pass. Each format specifier requires a specific type, and that type only. If you pass anything else (except maybe the unsigned equivalent of a signed type, or vice versa), you have undefined behavior; anything can potentially happen. Depending on the error different things may happen: passing a ...


0

Is there a feature in Valgrind like Tap in IBM Purify tool, which can detect currently leaked memory during runtime? No, there isn't. Valgrind can't know if there is a leak, unless the program finished, because it can't know what will be released when the program ends.


0

What you are observing is an implicit conversion with respect to char, hence the ascii value being outputted, there is no implicit conversion from a float to an int hence you get garbage: see the following specifically 'Numeric Promotions':http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/implicit_cast #include<stdio.h> int main( ) { char c='z'; float ...


0

You don't need to rely on printf to print the float as int, just cast it to int before passing to printf. float f = 12.2; printf("%d", (int)f); If you want to round instead of truncate, use round() printf("%d", (int)round(f));


0

Try import "qrc:/widgets" to solve your issue.


0

You need to floor the value yourself first - you are telling printf the float is really a double so it looks at the wrong bits. You can do this in a variety of ways, including floor or casting to an int. Think about what you might want to happen if you said int stoopid = 12.5f; The compiler I have to hand warns me: "'initializing' : conversion from ...


0

Have you even looked at the docs for printf? Try %c to print the char. The printf call can't just magically determine you wanted to to truncate a float to an int - either cast the float to an int [printf("%d", (int)b);] or print it with a floating format specifier [printf("%f", b);]


2

Use either printf("%f",c); or printf("%d",(int)c); There´s a nice table of format specifiers at http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/io/c/fprintf


0

This seems like a good occasion for a Reader-Writer lock. All the clients lock the vector for reading only, and the background service thread locks it for writing only once every minute. SharedLockable concept from c++14 which is implemented in Boost Thread as boost::shared_mutex The class boost::shared_mutex provides an implementation of a ...


1

If the message is > 30 bytes, the memory once occupied by 'test', but then freed, must be being reused by the reply data (obviously by serendipity). Thus, when you look at 'test' again it magically appears to be what you think it should be. This theory should be very simple for you to verify in the debugger by looking at addresses. Whatever, as Hristo said, ...


1

You need to link to the posix threads library on your system With gcc or clang, typically this is done by supplying g++ -pthread on the command line. Technically you should specify to link with the respective dynamic library too g++ -pthread test.cpp -lpthread -lboost_system -lboost_thread -lboost_filesystem


0

std::move is not required for returning objects: BigMatrix BuildBigMatrix() { ... return someBigMatrix; // *moved* outside of function }


0

If you are not constrained by C/C++, I would recommend Eclipse Xtext. It is simple to learn, has great documentation, and has the added benefit of automatically generating an Eclipse-based IDE that supports your language, with syntax-highlighting, content assist, and other powerful features. Xtext has its own programming language (Xtend) which is a more ...


0

but I don't know how to make fn1 work with fn3rdParty Try this: // this is outside your code's scope, as a // local function (eventually placed in a namespace) void adapt_fn1(void* data) { return fn1( reinterpret_cast<Data*>(data); } // client code: fn3rdParty = adapt_fn1; That said, if you can adapt the server code (the one that imposes the ...


1

If you come across the problem regularly, you could define a template alias and a generator function for the starting index: template <class T> using index_t = decltype(std::declval<T>().size()); template <class T, class U> constexpr index_t<T> index(T&&, U u) { return u; } for (auto i = index(c,0); i < c.size(); ++i) ...


6

There's no need for std::move here. The value of a function call expression is already an rvalue.


0

- You can contruct a string in the form (i,j,cobine[i],combine[j]) for each iteration. - Inorder to insert a multiple rows in a single query. [Normal insert query for multiple records INSERT INTO Table ( Column1, Column2 ) VALUES ( Value1, Value2 ), ( Value1, Value2 ) ] - also rewrite mysqlinsert2(i,j,combine[i],combine[j]) into *mysqlinsert2(str)*.and ...



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