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0

You're trying to pass a function pointer to the sqlite3_exec function of the wrong type. You need to change your callback's signature back to the way you had it. static int callback(void *param, int argc, char **argv, char **azColName) Then you should call sqlite3_exec appropriately. Something like this: rc = sqlite3_exec(db, "SELECT * FROM emp_info ...


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idk if it's something in vs2015's default runtime libraries why it's causing these unresolved externals or something not default linked anymore when making a win32 console project, but one of the unresolved externals go away when i switch the runtime library to /MTd, imp_iob_func still appears, but the solution i ended up going with is downloading the sdl2 ...


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Your program does not include a definition for the constructor of MySet. The constructor's name is MySet::MySet(). So when you try to create an instance of the object, the compiler does not know what to do. There are a couple solutions: Remove the line right after "public:" that declares the constructor. If you don't declare any constructors, your ...


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Why is it giving me an undefined reference to MySet::MySet() while trying to print my vector? You are creating an instance of MySet using MySet m; That uses the default constructor. The default constructor has been declared in the class but it has not been defined. You can fix it by defining it. MySet::MySet() {}


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Turns out, the issue was 100% unrelated. I used delwin on the window whenever I had to redraw it. However, this redraw was usually triggered by another thread printing something to it. Using wclear instead of delwin/newwin fixes everything, as does not actually redrawing winp when I don't need to. Admittedly, having done so in the first place was probably ...


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Your IsPack trait would match pretty much every template under the sun as long as it doesn't have a non-type parameter, which is a rather bad idea. template <class...> struct Pack {}; template <class, class, class = Pack<>> struct Remove_First; // First one isn't a pack, and isn't what we are looking for. template <class R, class F, ...


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In your situation, I suggest using return values (and testing them) not exceptions. Exceptions are not (necessarily) a high performance solution (i.e. try/catch is not necessarily fast), which is why they are usually employed for (no pun intended) exceptional circumstances. Sprinkling try/catch blocks everywhere often contributes to "design smells" - a ...


4

You want five ints. Of course you should use int *a=new int[5]; Since you are learning C++, it is wise to learn about Undefined Behavior. You may expect C++ to stop you or warn you if you are doing something that you shouldn't be doing, such as treating an int as if it were an int[5]. C++ isn't designed to track these sorts of mistakes. If you make ...


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Not sure about what instruction set you're talking about. But provided that instruction set supports it, you could 1. Declare and initialize the function pointer in your code 2. Use call or jump kind of instruction to execute from the memory address pointed to by the function pointer


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void GetScreenShot(void) { int x1, y1, x2, y2, w, h; // get screen dimensions x1 = GetSystemMetrics(SM_XVIRTUALSCREEN); y1 = GetSystemMetrics(SM_YVIRTUALSCREEN); x2 = GetSystemMetrics(SM_CXVIRTUALSCREEN); y2 = GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYVIRTUALSCREEN); w = x2 - x1; h = y2 - y1; // copy screen to bitmap HDC ...


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There are probably plenty of ways, but I'm still new so what I would do is change the data structure to vector. That way you can push or pop things out. #include <vector> //Necessary if you are not familiar with vectors. #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main(){ vector<string> names; names.push_back("Miss Scarlet"); ...


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The value of apple is greater than all the other values. Yet you are checking it first. The only two possible outcomes are apple or nothing


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If you meant for those integers to be percentages, make them cumulative. For the orange's cutoff, use the sum of apple and orange as you have them now. For cherry, the sum of the first three (apple, orange, and cherry). If you want the user to be able to enter percentages, express this process in the function you're using to set the thresholds (the Cspinner ...


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I think you are confused with error and exception. In your first class you have mention some condition in if statement means you have defined some condition so error can be handled. Exceptions are those which can be handled at the run.An Error is something that most of the time you cannot handle it. Errors are unchecked exception and the developer is not ...


3

Break statements are missing from your switch(s). Plus you need to type cast the result to float as all the variables are integers. i suggest you use: float perc; perc = (numCorrect/possibleCorrect)*100;


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Repeatedly appending elements to a vector is a really bad idea from a performance point of view, as it can cause repeated memory reallocations and copies. There are two main solutions to that. Set the size of the vector to the theoretical maximum length of your operation (nn in this case), and then use a loop to set some of the values in the vector. You ...


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If you look at the bottom of the MSDN page you linked to, it says Minimum Supported Client is Windows 8 Store apps only. The API is not supported in a normal desktop program.


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You need a break if you switch, and multiply by 100.0 first to implicitly promote the first expression to a double and then divide: int problem4() { int numCorrect = 0; int numIncorrect = 0; int possibleCorrect = 4; int correctAnswerOne = 120; int correctAnswerTwo = 65536; int correctAnswerThree = 18; int correctAnswerFour = 11; int guessOne; int ...


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The events are posted to the active window. Console windows are owned by the console subsystem, csrss.exe, and it receives the events, then translates them to characters and puts them in the console object which is your application's stdin. If you want to process events the Win32 GUI way, you should use a Win32 window (e.g. RegisterClass and CreateWindow), ...


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The regex \"(\\.)*\" that you proposed matches strings that consist of \ symbols alternating with any characters like: "\z\x\p\r" This regular expression would therefore fail to match a string like: "hello" The string "hello" would be matched by the regex \".*\" but that would also match the string """" or "\" both of which are invalid. To get rid of ...


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The scope of a variable refers to the extent to which different parts of a program have access to the variable. Variables can be declared as: Inside a function which is called local variables or internal variables. Outside of all functions which is called global variables or external variables and lifetime or "extent" extends across the entire run of the ...


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template<class...Ts> using nfun=std::function<double(decltype(Ts,0.)...)>; template<class...C> nfun<C...> func(const char*,C...c); that will return a n-ary std::function.


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You can limit the number of variadic arguments by using a static_assert. template <typename ... Args> void operator()(Args args&&...) { static_assert(sizeof...(Args) <= 2, "Can deal with at most 2 arguments!"); } Or you could use an enable_if template <typename ... Args> auto operator()(Args args&&...) -> ...


3

It's well defined to use unsigned integers (and size_t is unsigned) this way, with wraparound: that behavior is guaranteed by the standard, as opposed to with signed integers, where it's not guaranteed by the standard. It is however needlessly clever. As a general rule, to avoid problems due to implicit wrapping promotions to unsigned, use unsigned ...


0

Here is a pair of merge sort examples, somewhat optimized, and perhaps a bit more than what would be expected from a student. The top example is a top down merge sort. a[] is the array to be sorted, b[] is a temp array the same size as a[]. Copying data is avoided via a pair of recursive functions that alternate the direction of the merge depending on the ...


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All your code would be executed in Cocos thread, CCHttpRequest has its own thread to fetch data from server then when all data was fetched the callback you registered before would be called in cocos thread, too. After the registration of callback, cocos thread continues to execute to your while, now the callback is not called (data isn't completed) your ...


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I can't speak to how safe that code is but I think it's a pretty poor style. A better way would be to use iterators which support forward or reverse iteration. For example: std::vector<int> v = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }; bool rev = true; if (rev) { for (auto itr = v.rbegin(); itr != v.rend(); ++itr) { std::cout << *itr << "\n"; ...


1

Is it safe to use negative integers with size_t? No, it is dangerous. Overflow. size_t a = -1; std::cout << a << "\n"; Output: 4294967295 // depends on the system, largest value possible here


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What's the problem exactly? It's just a block of I420 format pixel data. With any YUV -> RGB conversion method(even WebRTC library provide one), remain work to do is just drawing RGB bitmap to a window. In my personal experience, conversion was really fast, and drawing to the buffer(memory DC, backbuffer) was sufficiently fast. Only issue was actual screen ...


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I don't think llvm's libc++ can be compiled with msvc. Your best bet would be to try to use LLVM to produce MSVC compatible code that can (in theory) be linked with Visual C++ compiled code. http://clang.llvm.org/docs/MSVCCompatibility.html


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On Windows OS, a simple one line answer to this question is to use the below command in DOS prompt to see the preprocessed file: CL /P /C myprogram.c This will generate a file called myprogram.i. Open it and look out for your expanded preprocessors.


1

https://www.openssl.org/ Use it as much as you want in your socket communication


1

You're just printing the converted value but you're not returning it. Each of those if blocks should contain a return statement returning the result of the computation.


0

#include<vector> #include<algorithm> #include<iostream> template<typename T> struct pred{ void operator()(T x) { //implemnt algorithm } T value; }; class property{ }; int main() { std::vector<property> myShape; std::for_each(myShape.begin(),myShape.end(), pred<property>()); ...


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Here you go : void readFromFile(string filename) { string line; ifstream myfile(filename); if (myfile.is_open()) { while ( getline(myfile,line) ) { cout << line << '\n'; } myfile.close(); } } int main(int argc, char* argv) { readFromFile("Input.txt"); getchar(); return 0; }


1

newType_t l_obj; This declares an instance of the newType_t class, which contains three pointers to instances of the aClass class. The pointers are not initialized to point to any valid, instantiated object. l_obj.classObject[1]->getNum(); This dereferences the 2nd pointer in the array. Since this pointer is not initialized to a valid, instantiated ...


3

As others have said in various comments, it's generally not possible, since the preprocessor expands macros as one of the earliest phases of compilation (doing text substitution with preprocessor output fed to the compiler proper). Since macro expansion is a text substitution mechanism, macros can interact with each other in many ways for which watching ...


2

You haven't initialized your pointers, so accessing them with _obj.classObject[1]-> causes undefined behavior (like a segmentation fault).


4

You have an array of pointers, which are uninitialized since you haven't told them where to point to. Using uninitialized pointers causes undefined behavior, which has manifested itself as a crash in your case. You should have an array of objects since there is no use for pointers here: aClass classObject[3]; Notice the removal of the * in the ...


3

class my_tuple : public std::tuple < std::vector<my_tuple> > {}; This is currently undefined behavior because it instantiates a standard library container, std::vector, with an incomplete type, my_tuple, which does not become complete until the closing } of its definition. However, there is a proposal to permit instantiating certain standard ...


0

If you use #include "room.h" in different cpp files then you probably get a linker error because this below here is not a type declaration. const string ROOM_STRINGS[NUM_ROOM_TYPES] = { "Bay", "Latrine", "Cabin", "Bridge" }; You are creating and allocating a variable with name ROOM_STRINGS. By declaring it in different cpp files you will have ...


0

If you want access to state within a class then that state needs to be a member of the class. Note: This is not unique to Qt. For example: class Foo { public: void memberFunction() { p->getName(); // This member function may access member data } private: Player* mPlayer; // This is a class member }; ...


1

The problem is that the "fail" flag is not set until you make an attempt at reading some more data from the file. Here is a quick way of fixing this: for (;;) { //Extract the line from the list getline(inputFile,item_name,'-'); getline(inputFile,item_unit,'-'); inputFile >> item_amount; inputFile >> item_price; if ...


0

You need to delete the default copy constructor and assignment operators. These functions are defined implicitly, and need to be explicitly deleted, as they will attempt to copy the vector and its contents (which is an illegal operation on a unique_ptr). struct V_wrapper { public: V_wrapper(std::vector<std::unique_ptr<AClass> > v) : ...


0

You may be better off using polymorphism instead of hundreds of ifs. Instead of a flag have a polymorphic base class that does the data adding and instead of changing the flag you chose the correct derived class. The calling code would then simply be: data_adder->add(key, value, error_description); Example base class and derived classes: struct ...


0

What kind of errors? Your issue might be including the same header more than once. Try adding this to each header: #ifndef ROOM_H #define ROOM_H ... code ... #endif To be clear the 'ROOM_H' above needs to be unique to each header.


1

This is a typical symptom of the while (!infile.fail()) anti-pattern. I'd define a struct and overload operator>> for that type: struct item { std::string name; std::string unit; int amount; int price; }; std::istream &std::operator>>(std::istream &is, item &i) { getline(is, i.name, '-'); getline(is, ...


0

mergesort should call merge; not the other way around. You're making this task very difficult on yourself. You're swapping elements in the two input sequences. That isn't how a merge algorithm works. Given two sorted sequences, a merge algorithm is fundamentally this: While both lists have data, peel the item smallest of the two list heads off and put it ...


2

There is no difference in your example to a typedef. Those are identical: typedef int a; using a = int; In general, it is more versatile though, which is the reason it was introduced: It can be templated. template<class X> using smart = std::unique_ptr<X>; It can be used to import symbols into the current scope. struct Derived : Base { ...


0

Please use this template function in place of switch template<typename T> void func() { T value; model->fetch(value, P->id); writer->write(value, P->id); }



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