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0

You have to tell the output stream that you want a fixed precision of 2 digits after the dot: #include <iomanip> // ... std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(2) << MONEYS << '\n';


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Which is faster depends entirely on the compiler and in fact most optimizing compilers will essentially turn your second version into your first during compilation anyway. Even if they don't, on a modern computer, a division operation is only going to take a few nanoseconds so unless you are doing that operation millions or billions of times, it probably ...


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It looks like it's due to default precision of cout stream for floating point values: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/ios/ios_base/precision/


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The second is faster because it doesn't repeat the same calculations


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Floating point (float, double and long double) aren't great for storing exact values. They are great because they make it easy to do lots of different math on a wide range of values, but there are many values which can't be represented exactly using IEEE floating points. Values as simple as 0.1 can't be exactly expressed by the type, but the input and ...


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If the debug library says you're going out of range, then you're going out of range. Somehow the debugger is getting confused about which attributes are located where in memory (or it expects it to be in a register which has been overwritten...so many ways this can happen). Thus the debugger is NOT showing you the real picture about what's going on.


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If you have multiple projects within the solution, you need to add /FS to each project for it to work. Simply select the project->properties->C/C++ -> Commandline ->Additional Options.


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Classes are defined in header files. The .cpp should contain the implementation of the functions, not the class definition. ui.cpp should be: #include <stdio.h> /* for puts */ #include "ui.h" void Console::run() { puts("Hello my friend!"); } If you’re learning C++, try a tutorial like http://www.learncpp.com/.


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Call GetModuleHandle() with the raw name like user32.dll or whatever the name of the DLL is. After you have the handle, call GetModuleFileName() to get the fully qualified name including path.


3

Should not be the same name in the header and cpp? No, the .cpp file should have the implementations, not the declaration. This would look like: #include "ui.h" void Console::run() { puts("Hello my friend!"); } Note that you also probably should include guards in your .h file to prevent them from being included multiple times.


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Because you redefined it. Literally right there in your code. To define one of its member functions, you do just that, without repeating the class's definition: #include "ui.h" void Console::run() { puts("Hello my friend!"); }


2

Actually, bitset constructor accepts unsigned long in C++ 03 and unsigned long long in C++ 11. Now, as for storing float in a bitset, this should do the trick: float f = 0.0f; cin >> f; bitset<32> my_bit(*(uint32_t*)&f); // my_bit? What kind of a name is that, anyway?..


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I got rid of the pops / clicks when stopping playback, by filling the buffer with zeros after the fade out. However I still get pops when re-starting playback, despite filling with zeros and then fading back in (it is frustrating).


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For example: Deposit is derived from Transaction. Deposit constructor implicitly calls Transaction constructor with no arguments - Transaction(), but it doesn't exist. So to solve your problem you should define Transaction constructor without arguments - Transaction(), or call explicitly constructor with 2 arguments Transaction(QString type, QDateTime ...


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Queue's size is 0 QUEUE q(size); <-- size = 0 Change it to: QUEUE q(capacity); <-- whatever user enters, will help if you check for user input


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I'd use Eigen::Map to map your array onto a Matrix8u and then cast it to something like Matrix32i. Assuming your data is in a form of an array data[] = {0, 1, 2, ...} here is sample code: typedef Eigen::Matrix<uint8_t, Eigen::Dynamic, Eigen::Dynamic, Eigen::RowMajor> Matrix8u; typedef Eigen::Matrix<int32_t, Eigen::Dynamic, Eigen::Dynamic, ...


1

int maxN is the capacity of the queue, So your queue have a capacity of 0. And so it is always empty. You should do QUEUE q(capacity);


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Update: The code should compile, because [class.ctor]/5 reads: The implicitly-defined default constructor performs the set of initializations of the class that would be performed by a user-written default constructor for that class with no ctor-initializer (12.6.2) and an empty compound-statement. If that user-written default constructor would satisfy ...


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/(\"(?:(?!\/\/).)+?\")/ Using the magic of non-capturing groups and negative look aheads, I have engineered the following: quotationFormat.setForeground(Qt::darkGreen); rule.pattern = QRegExp("\"(?:(?!\\/\\/).)+\"");//QRegExp("\".*\""); rule.pattern.setMinimal(true); rule.format = quotationFormat; highlightingRules.append(rule); Magic applied, and you ...


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Firstly, I would avoid using std::string as a return value from the DLL. Unless you plan on using the same compiler (and version) and stl, there is a good chance that you won't be able to properly read the string. Secondly, the problem is that QApplication::allWidgets accesses a private list. allWidgets is implemented like this: QWidgetList ...


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"if the layout originally has NULL parent, will QWidget take ownership of it?" Yes. Incidentally, you don't need to use explicit heap allocations, and you can set the layout on a widget by passing the widget to the layout's constructor. For example: int main(int argc, char ** argv) { ... QWidget mainWidget; ... QWidget ...


2

This block of code for (l = 1; l < d; l++) for (i = 1; i <= n; i++) for (j = 1; j <= n; j++) for (k = 1; k <= n; k++) e[i][j] = e[i][j] + (a[i][k] * a[k][j]); sets e to be a*a no matter what d is. You need to have a temporary matrix to make things work. Bootstrap: e = a; In the ...


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The way to look at this would be to understand what would happen if this was actually legal. When a class is instantiated, all its class members are constructed first. So, in your example, the construction of A a will take place before A is fully constructed, which is not possible. Also, this will result in an infinite recursive construction of objects of ...


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Example: g++ -o myprogram myprogram.cpp -lncurses


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If you create a queue with size 10 then head equals 10. In get we use head = head % N; head = 10 % 10 head = 0 So head is 0 and then we increment it to 1.


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You are missing out the ` head = head % n; // this mean head is now the remainder of the division // between head and N` It means head is no longer 10; head = 11 % 11 which is 0 as the remainder of this division is zero. Therefore, head = 0; Then when you return q[head++], you are returning q[0] and then you are setting head to 1.


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You forgot to include sstream: #include <sstream>


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Have you tried using the 'Advanced...' option in the locator? You can change the scope of the search to the Current Project, All Projects, Files on the System, etc. I use this to even search for strings I use for debug output in my code.


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Consider a program which takes two numbers as input and swaps them. The program uses a template function: #include<iostream> using namespace std; template <class X> void Numswap(X &a, X &b){ X temp; temp = a; b = a; a = temp; } Now I have compiled the code and generated the exe. When the exe is executed it asks for user input. ...


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I didn't find a correct answer for this, but here is a workaround: calling the Get method on interface org.freedesktop.DBus.Properties and unmarshalling the result manually. The tricky part was figuring the result's content (it's a QVariant containing a QDBusVariant containing a QDBusArgument) The updated main function: //... int main(int argc, char ...


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If you look at the documentation here: http://doc.qt.io/qt-5/qobject.html#connect at the end there is the note Note: This function is thread-safe.


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Oh well the brain fart... I just realized I can provide a constructor A::A(const A* other) myself without using copy/assignment constructor...


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It appears I have found the issue, it was an overlook on my part. You can load the library from the imported class, and you can place the method definition in the the imported class. YOU MUST however modify the function as so: initial header: JNIEXPORT jobjectArray JNICALL Java_com_stackoverflow_MainAcitivty_helloWorld(){ to JNIEXPORT jobjectArray JNICALL ...


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Start debugger, such as gdb, and run your code from there. When it seg faults, it will show you offending line in your code, if you configured debugger to find your source file. For simple cases, when the binary and source are in the same directory, a debugger can usually find the source code by default. Otherwise, put cout or printf() lines in code & ...


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you could try to use these code: https://github.com/Itseez/opencv/blob/master/samples/cpp/imagelist_creator.cpp for me it worked so well before you'll need to install the openCV library ;)


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There is no partial specialization of function templates. There is only full specialization (which is usually a bad idea), and overloading. template<typename MT> void serialize(map<string, MT> data, Stream& stream) { //... } would be an overload. If you always allowed type deduction to happen, it would probably behave like you would ...


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You would probably benefit from reading up about game loops. The following article is very useful. http://gafferongames.com/game-physics/fix-your-timestep/ This is roughly how I handle the game loop in my SDL games const double FRAME_TIME = 1 / 60 // delta time for 60 FPS double lastTime = SDL_GetTicks(); double frameCounter = 0; double unprocessedTime ...


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You can use a stringstream in a way similar to that: string s= "This is a test"; stringstream ss(s); while (ss) { string word; ss>> word; cout<< word<< endl; }


0

new vector is usually wrong. You should use, with most preferred if possible first, std::vector<component_change> _changes(numThreads); or std::vector<std::unique_ptr<component_change>> _changes(numThreads); or std::vector<component_change*> _changes(numThreads); or if each element of the vector should itself contain an ...


2

Assuming you're using a double-pointer as a weird C-style way of emulating a reference to emulate a return value, then you'd want to write through the pointer to whatever it pointed at, not modify the local function argument: void getPointer(int** externalPointer) {*externalPointer = internalPointer;} ^ add * ...


0

If you pass in an (int**) and assign it its address, the thing that it points to will be classPointer. class Blah { public: void getPointer(int** externalPointer) { *externalPointer = classPointer; // Add the star at the beginning. } int* classPointer; } Call is like this: int* k = new int; std::cout << "k=" << *k << " at ...


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I think you're kind of mislead, this size that you are reading belongs to the vector in the first element of the array. Its size is equal to 0 since no elements have been inserted in the vector yet.


0

Might be a "use after free" problem, which means you're trying to access an object that has already been deleted. Did you check it? E.g. put a breakpoint to the line where your SIGSEGV happens. Inspect the this pointer and value of your pressedSocket member. If you're lucky it'll have an obscure value like "0xfeeefeee" - in that case your object is not ...


1

Your program is correct. But you misinterpreted the debugger. _changes's size is not 0, but the first vector in your array (the one _changes points at) is empty. Thats because the debugger does not know if _changes points at a single element or an array (in that case the compiler would not know how many elements are in that array). Simply use a vector and ...


0

Are you interested in have a vector for each thread, or a vector containing items used by each thread? I assumed the later, but my answer could be adapted. This is using a statically sized array; (this syntax is close). const int NUMBER_OF_THREADS = 5; component_change* _changes[NUMBER_OF_THREADS] = { new component_change(1), new component_change(2), ...


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Probably either this or event is null. Check whether you instantiated your class. If you developing on linux then you can run your program with Valgrind. It will exactly say what went wrong, just carefully read its messages.


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If the size can be determined at compile time use a std::array. If the size is a run-time argument then use a vector and don't change the size of the container.


0

Usually composition is preferred over inheritance, but it doesn't seem applicable to your case. Why not to inherit Viewers from one another? Make a base viewer with a simple functionality, available all over and then inherit specialised one from it adding new functionality. As for menu and actions, connected with it, they should be represented as a separate ...


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You have insert(&tree, num); after cout << "\n\nEnter a value into the tree(type -1 for options)\n"; cin >> num; So you will always add a number in even if it is -1. You need to check for -1 before you call insert.


1

I'm not sure what you mean by "start with a Release Build" or why that is an issue. When you start a new Visual Studio project, it generates two configurations for it. Debug and Release. At any time, you can flip the configuration between Debug and Release without issue. A Debug build is one that has compiler optimizations turned off. The default linkage ...



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