New answers tagged

0

You can't call list.erase(list.end()). You can't call list.erase(it) multiple times (for one it, because it gets invalidated) You can't call list.erase(it) with it equal to the current underlying iterator of std::for_each, because it invalidates it as well as it and then result of ++it is undefined. You don't know what you're doing yet, but if you plan to ...


0

Your code is borderline legal. With the posted code, it is legal by coincidence. If you add one more item to the list, your program will crash. Try the following to see the problem: int main() { std::list<int> list; list.push_front(5); list.push_front(10); list.push_front(12); auto it = list.end(); it--; // point to 5 ...


0

Use a typedef or an alias declaration, ideally in the narrowest possible scope. void some_function() { typedef MyClass::mytype mytype; // or: using mytype = MyClass::mytype; } // namespace not polluted


0

You can do: typedef MyClass::mytype mytype;


0

After upgrading to scons version 2.4.1, this issue is now solved.


0

Yes it is definitely a bad code and it is legal, but introducing undefined behavior. The iterator returned by list.end() is no reference. Hence multiple invocations of list.erase(it); is undefined. Note: C++ allows writing code, which is legal, but essentially is a good shot into your own foot.


2

It can't be done. There is indeed much information available to the compiler that cannot be easily used in a metaprogramming context. Ongoing work on adding compile-time reflection to the language might eventually improve this situation, but don't hold your breath. In the meantime, you'll just have to do it the old-fashioned way. struct Outer { struct ...


0

Your issue is in this part of the code: string read_string(ifstream file, int verse) { string temp_var; for (int i=0; i<verse; i++) getline(file, temp_var); return temp_var; } size_t lines_count(ifstream if_file) { size_t a=0; string temp_str; while (getline(if_file, temp_str)) ++a; return a; } Both of ...


0

Yes, it's legal. There's const iters if you need something that is guaranteed not to modify the underlying container.


0

I have another approach here, it looks better for using with macros: #include <iostream> using std::cout; using std::endl; #include <vector> using std::vector; #include <type_traits> class A { public: using ClassType = int; void print_const_integer(const int& a) { cout << "A's member function accepting a const ...


1

it in the loop below is an iterator. Hence, to access the element that it refers to, you need to dereference it (*it)or use the member access operator (it->). set<Point::Ptr> points = world->getPoints(); // have set of pointers to Point for(set<Point::Ptr>::iterator it = points.begin(); it != points.end(); it++) { ROS_INFO("points are: ...


0

Using for(set<Point::Ptr>::iterator it = *points.begin(); it != points.end(); it++) is a problem since it is an iterator, but *points.begin() is not. You need to use: for(set<Point::Ptr>::iterator it = points.begin(); it != points.end(); it++) { Point::CPtr myPoint = *it; // Now you can use myPoint } If you are able to use a C++11 ...


0

It feels odd problem since preparing random test data does not need to be ultra efficient, also the data may be usually whatever. You can have the test values as correct positions of those elements or pairs that give range of correct positions. For example array of pairs: 1,1 2,4 2,4 2,4 5,6 5,6 7,7 ... Store the state of random generator somewhere. ...


0

GetLogicalDriveStrings fills your buffer with a double-null terminated array of strings. You can iterate through like this, stopping when the first character of the "next" string is null. wchar_t szDrives[MAX_PATH]; if (GetLogicalDriveStrings(MAX_PATH, szDrives)) { wchar_t* pDrive = szDrives; while (*pDrive) { // do something with pDrive ...


0

Short answer using std::swap; // allow ADL /* <===== THE LINE I DONT UNDERSTAND */ needed to avoid recursive call to the member swap. Member swap disables ADL.


0

In my case it worked by just adding the following in the .pro file: CONFIG += qt OR add instead: CONFIG += qt QT += svg


0

SORRY, found my problem, was not related to this code... my bad, my bad.


0

No, the object models provide no functionality to check on licenses or anything similar.


3

You never added a definition for Singleton(); Which is used in Singleton* Singleton::Instance() by _instance = new Singleton; Typically you should you can layout a singleton like: class Singleton { public: static Singleton* Instance() { static Singleton s; return &s; } Singleton(const Singleton&) = delete; void operator=(const ...


2

constexpr expressions must be defined. Yours is not defined, so in that case int(constexpr_declval<int>()) is not constexpr. Which means maybe_noexcept(int(constexpr_declval<int>())) is not a constexpr, so is not noexcept. And the compiler properly returns false. You also cannot invoke UB in a constexpr. I cannot think of a way to make a ...


0

Although QSplitter is a widget, you can't create one directly in Qt Designer. It is only available for laying out pre-existing widgets - which does not fit your use-case, since you need to create child widgets dynamically. However, you can work around this limitation by using widget promotion. This is a simple mechanism that allows you to add substitute ...


1

As far as C++ goes, your mistake is that the class FrameObserver has no default constructor (i.e. a constructor that can be called without arguments). It's not defined explicitly, nor will it be generated, since another constructor has already been defined (see here). Thus, you can't write FrameObserver fo; Since this invokes the default constructor ...


-1

How do I fix it? Don't do that! In fact, what you're doing is causing a stack overflow; the reason is that 2*8192 of integer seem to be larger at what OS X grants your process in stack space (which is the amount of memory a function might occupy upon being called). If you need larger arrays, getting the memory later is a good idea; you can do that ...


1

bind must be told what to do with parameters passed to its return value. By default, it simply discards them. When you pass it to the std::function, it tries to type-erase it. std::function passes a Touch*, Event* to the bind. bind's return value discards them, and calls (this->*&Game::onTouchEnded)(), as you requested. This is not a valid call, ...


0

fgets(s, sizeof*(s), stdin); -- is wrong. it should be sizeof(s) The *(s) is character (first element of array), while s is array. Because single character is of size 1, you got 1.


0

No standard or Boost mutex-type class provides a copy constructor. If you need to copy classes containing a mutex member, the mutex needs to be turned into a pointer, and you need to provide a copy constructor to deal with the mutex appropriately. What would copying a mutex even do? Would both instances refer to the same mutex? Would each instance have it's ...


0

You may find Treeline useful for this purpose. Entries are saved as xml, not all that read able but it does export to html which can be read anywhere.


0

-fpermissive Downgrade some diagnostics about nonconformant code from errors to warnings. Thus, using -fpermissive will allow some nonconforming code to compile. By compiling with -fpermissive you are downgrading some errors with your code to warning to compile. You should avoid doing this. What's happing with your code is you're trying to assign ...


-1

OR do the easiest thing to do, move the __declspec to the ONLY members you care to export: class HelloWorld { public: __declspec(dllexport) HelloWorld() { abc.resize(5); for(int i=0; i<5; i++) abc[i] = i*10; str="hello the world"; } __declspec(dllexport) ~HelloWorld() { } ...


1

You problem is that you are using the wrong event type. Take a second look at Lazy Foo's tutorial and here: TextInputEvent e.text.text is reserved for Text Input events and nothing else. Being SDL_Event an union of structures, there may happens overlaps. That is what you see in the terminal output. Remove the SDL_KEYDOWN event and try this instead: case ...


0

#include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { int i,n,p=1; cout<<"Enter a number: "; cin>>n; cout<<endl; for (i=1;i<=n; i++) { cout<<i<<" X "; p=p*i; } cout<<endl<<endl<<p<<" factorial of "<<n; return 0; }


3

Making all your conversion operators explicit (to prevent implicit conversions) would be a good start: struct A { double dbl_; bool boo_; explicit operator double() const { return dbl_; } explicit operator bool() const { return boo_; } }; I'm not sure, but I imagine this would help to prevent the ambiguities too.


1

You have a bug here: arr = new T[size]; With your parameters, it means something like: int *arr = new int*[size]; The type of new int*[size] is not int* You can do something like: template<typename T> void input(T * &arr, int size){// arr = new T[size]; for(int i=0; i<size; i++){ cout<<"\nEnter: "; ...


0

You have marked this post as C++. One possible C++ approach: (not compiled, not tested) std::string result; // empty string { std::stringstream ss; ss << "Score: " // tempText literal << 6; // tempScore literal // at this point, the values placed into tempTextResult // are contained in ss result = ss.str(); ...


6

When you compile with -c, it generates an object (.o) file, not an executable. You need to compile it without -c in order to make an executable file. Larger C++ programs will have more than one .cpp file; for each .cpp file, you would compile using -c to generate their respective .o file. Then you would link these .o files (running g++ without -c) to ...


1

Yes, your use of for_each is a reasonable analog of the preceding loop. I feel obliged to point out, however, that I find for_each probably the least useful algorithm in the library. From what I've seen, using it generally indicates that you're still basically thinking in terms of loops, and just changing the syntax you use for those loops. I also think ...


6

As the docs for c_str say, "The pointer returned may be invalidated by further calls to other member functions that modify the object." This includes the destructor. const char * tempScore = std::to_string(6).c_str(); This makes tempScore point to a temporary string that no longer exists. You should do this: std::string tempScore = std::to_string(6); ... ...


0

If you want to copy the data from one thing to another you can use std::copy int main() { std::vector<std::uint32_t> nums{3, 4, 2, 8, 15}; std::stringstream list1; std::copy(nums.begin(), nums.end(),std::ostream_iterator<std::uint32_t>(list1,",")); std::cout << list1.str(); } Live Example This will end the stream with a ...


1

Why don't you just test it out? auto vs std::for_each As you can see the assembly output is the same for both. It just doesn't make any difference for your example.


0

char*freeThis; free(freeThis);


0

Just for the record, even though it does not provide any answer or workaround, but I am currently working with VS Express 2013, and I can assure you that #include <iostream> template<typename T> class base { public: template<bool good> void foo() { std::cout << "base::foo<" << good << ">()" << ...


3

std::string::find_first_of() return value is of type size_t, and that's typedef for some unsigned type. In order to compare to integer{-1}, compiler should yield a common type. According to the standard usual arithmetic conversions: If the operand that has unsigned integer type has rank greater than or equal to the rank of the type of the other ...


-4

Yes, that is right. There is no need for the reference in (std::uint32_t &n) if you had performance as the motive.


1

Try listener->onTouchEnded = bind(&Game::onTouchEnded, this, std::placeholders::_1, std::placeholders::_2); or try a lambda function listener->onTouchEnded = [this](Touch* touch, Event* event){ this->onTouchEnded(touch, event); };


0

To fix //std::cout<<"inside fooList :"<<i->p<<" and "<<i->test(); // error-1 change std::list<Foo>::const_iterator i=fooList.begin(); to std::list<Foo>::iterator i=fooList.begin(); To fix //std::cout<<(*it)->p<<std::endl; // error-2 replace with ...


8

s.find_first_of("p") returns a size_t which is an unsigned type. The > operator will convert -1 to an unsigned type before s.find_first_of("p")>-1; is evaluated. That's how C++ works: if an operator that takes two arguments encounters a signed and an unsigned type as those arguments, then the signed one gets converted to an unsigned one. -1 when ...


1

Under the covers, asio calls SSL_Shutdown() in the underlying OpenSSL library: The documentation for which is here: https://www.openssl.org/docs/manmaster/ssl/SSL_shutdown.html ... and contains the following ominous text: The behaviour of SSL_shutdown() additionally depends on the underlying BIO. However, my understanding of things is that the ...


3

No such alignment guarantee is provided. Try this: template<class T, size_t A> T* over_aligned(size_t N){ static_assert(A <= alignof(std::max_align_t), "Over-alignment is implementation-defined." ); static_assert( std::is_trivially_destructible<T>{}, "Function does not store number of elements to destroy" ); using ...


3

I added two variables, temp and temp2, to store values for calculation but this shouldn't make it 10 times slower Operations on float and double are normally handled by the hardware. Whereas operations on GMP types are handled by GMP library in software. GMP values also require more memory to store and memory is often the bottleneck.


0

As asked by David Doria, here is the final version of the function get_eext after a few corrections. This version worked fine for me. Mat config_eext(float wl, float we, float wt, Mat image) { Mat eline, gradx, grady, img_gray, eedge; //bitdepth defined as CV_32F image.convertTo(img_gray, bitdepth); //Convolution Kernels Mat m1, m2, m3, m4, m5; m1 = ...



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