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1

Because it needs two user defined converstions, const char* -> std::string, and then std::string -> `HasPtrValue, but only once is permitted in one conversion sequence.


0

As far as C is concerned, you cannot rely on the execution character being ASCII; the standard only mandates the minimum set of characters that must belong to it. The execution character set may be ASCII, it may be EBCDIC, it may be UTF-8, etc. Your method is "safe" in the sense that it shouldn't cause a segfault or open a security hole, but it's not ...


0

You simply forgot to break out of the case if it has been processed. That way it will fall through the cases and handle the false case after the true case has been handled. Try this: switch (h) { case true: std::cout << "This character is a digit."; break; case false: std::cout << "Wrong! Try again!" << std::endl; goto ...


0

THis is a bad idea. You are better off learning to use reference counted pointers (shared_ptr in boost or whatever the later standard call them - I am blanking at the moment). Once you do that your coding style will be transformed, life becoms clean , simple and reliable. You never code new or delete again, kittens purr, lambs gambol, ... All joking aside - ...


1

I assume that you would like to do some sort of stress testing of your program. Your approach with a process performing frequent memory allocations and deallocations puts you on the right path, except that the allocations need to be done in the same address space as your running process, i.e. it should be a separate thread, not a separate process. Write a ...


0

Here is an explanation about cin.get: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/istream/istream/get/ You should replace cin >> message with cin.get (message,size_of_max_aprox_input)


2

At program startup, allocate a bunch of pointers to random length blocks, then delete some random portion of them in a random order.


0

When using the constructor taking a facet pointer the created locale takes ownership of the facet and will thus delete it in its destructor. Here, you pass a pointer to a stack-allocated facet.


0

This is very easy to do if you are willing to use the boost library. Here is the code snippit #include "boost/asio.hpp" using namespace boost::asio; ... io_service io_service; ip::udp::socket socket(io_service); ip::udp::endpoint remote_endpoint; socket.open(ip::udp::v4()); remote_endpoint = ip::udp::endpoint(ip::address::from_string("192.168.0.4"), ...


3

you should not delete pointer returned by getenv (see here, part about undefined behavior) if you're changing global environment, please keep in mind, that env. is assigned to process at its start and all child processes inherit it from parent. So if you start program from IDE/console started before env change it will not be reflected in its child process. ...


0

The closest thing I could think of to do what you want is if you can somehow find a preprocessor define which contains the contents of gcc -v, which includes for instance $ gcc -v Using built-in specs. COLLECT_GCC=gcc COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.8/lto-wrapper Target: x86_64-linux-gnu Configured with: ../src/configure -v ...


3

push_back takes a reference but it copies the passed value in the function. From cppreference void push_back( const T& value );(1) void push_back( T&& value );(2) (since C++11) Appends the given element value to the end of the container. 1) The new element is initialized as a copy of value. 2) value is moved into the ...


1

I'd just write something external to C++ to define the macros for you. I don't see anything in Boost.Predef that gives you anything more than just linux. Something like: linux_defines() { if -f /etc/redhat-release; then awk '{ printf("-D__rhel_ver__=%d\n",$7 * 100) }' /etc/redhat-release elif -f /etc/lsb-release; then ...


1

i have problem . i have win7-64bit and visual studio 2013 and opencv-3 the program can't start because opencv_word300d.dll is missing from your computer . try reinstalling the program to fix problem.


0

You can achieve this by passing to C++ the bytes of your Bitmap directly : JNIEXPORT jbyteArray function(JNIEnv* env, jclass cls, jbyteArray array) Nervertheless, can you precise the way the channels are changed ?


3

'Concepts lite' were already accepted for C++17 No, it isn't. It's a separate TS. will any concepts come predefined? Not by the Concepts TS, which is limited to the language feature. The current Ranges TS working draft does define a number of concepts.


0

template<typename T, typename... Arguments> struct are_same; template <typename T, typename A1, typename... Args> struct are_same<T, A1, Args...>{ static const bool value = std::is_same<T, A1>::value && are_same<T, Args...>::value;}; template <typename T> struct are_same<T>{static const bool value = ...


0

Why would you convert the letters to numbers in your own way, surely there are standards which describe exactly this like for instance UTF-16, ASCII UTF-8, latin, latin-2 ... etc etc etc. If you are asking whether there are standard implemented in all languages, then probably the answer is yes. But if you are asking if the chars are in all the languages the ...


0

I'm getting these strange artifacts after using "texture arrays" You are not using "texture arrays". You use arrays of texture samplers. From your fragment shader: #version 330 core // ... in DATA{ // ... float tid; }fs_in; //... if(fs_in.tid > 0.0){ int tid = int(fs_in.tid - 0.5); texColor = texture(textures[tid], ...


-2

Use Freeglut, the Free OpenGL Utility Toolkit alternative to GLUT. FreeGlut Download and follow steps mentioned in README.cmake For windows How to build freeglut with CMake on Windows (MS Visual Studio) Download CMake (http://www.cmake.org/cmake/resources/software.html). Get one of the releases from the binary distribution section. Run the CMake ...


0

After modification using the C++11 Std I'm here now, still with problems. #include <iostream> #include <array> #include "ta_libc.h" using namespace std; struct Struct_Macd { double Macd; double Signal; double Histogram; } MacdResult; void go(TA_Real *close, const int array_size, TA_Integer fastPeriod, TA_Integer slowPeriod, ...


1

This is basically a question about a specific C++ implementation. "Can I assume that a specific behavior, undefined by the standard, will continue to be handled by ($CXX) on platform XYZ in the same way under circumstances UVW." I think you either should clarify by saying exactly what compiler and platform you are working with, and then consult their ...


1

Memory is not leaking, as there is still a handle to the allocated memory. However, there will be continual growth because: The io_service is not running because run() is returning as there is no work. This results in completion handlers being allocated, queued into the io_service, but neither executed nor freed. Additionally, any cleanup that is ...


1

I suspect that you've got an issue unique to the combination of mingw/gcc/glibc on Windows because your code performs faster with optimizations on Linux where gcc is altogether more 'at home'. On a fairly pedestrian Linux VM using gcc 4.8.2: $ g++ main.cpp struct.cpp $ time a.out real 0m2.981s user 0m2.876s sys 0m0.079s $ g++ -O2 main.cpp ...


2

Historically, the ellipsis syntax ... comes from C. This complicated beast was used to power printf-like functions and is to be used with va_list, va_start etc... As you noted, it is not typesafe; but then C is far from being typesafe, what with its implicit conversions from and to void* for any pointer types, its implicit truncation of integrals/floating ...


0

This code is based up some I wrote in this Stackoverflow answer. One has to be careful to preserve %ebx register on some x86 based architectures/ABI. %ebx is used to relocate code (shared object etc) when position independent code (-fPIC gcc option) is being generated. The code below avoids using =b in the extended assembler output and uses a register the ...


4

OS changes, innocuous system changes (different hardware version!), or compiler changes can all cause previously "working" UB to not work. But it is worse than that. Sometimes a change to an unrelated compilation unit, or far away code in the same compilation unit, can cause previously "working" UB to work; as an example, two inline functions or methods ...


1

I guess the literal answer is because the Standard says so. From [expr.unary.op]: The operand of ~ shall have integral or unscoped enumeration type; the result is the one’s complement of its operand. Integral promotions are performed. The type of the result is the type of the promoted operand. which, according to [conv.prom] is: A prvalue of an ...


0

In Linux world, you can use http://stackoverflow.com/a/13129698/4776786 this will work in terminal. You press any key and you have his code, without pressing ENTER. http://asm.sourceforge.net/articles/rawkb.html - assembly version http://wiki.libsdl.org/SDL_GetKeyFromScancode Use SDL. Or type in terminal $: sudo apt-get source libsdl-image1.2-dev ...


1

This is a little challenging with SSE because there is little provision for bit packing (you want to take two bits from every character and pack them contiguously). Anyway, the special instruction _mm_movemask_epi8 can help you. For the string-to-binary conversion, you can proceed as follows: load the 16 characters string (pad with zeroes or clear after ...


0

For why specifically such a thing wasn't proposed (or was proposed and rejected), I do not know. Such a thing would certainly be useful, but would add more complexity to the language. As Quentin demonstrates, there is already proposes a C++11 way of achieving such a thing with templates. When Concepts gets added to the standard, we'll have another, more ...


0

One way of solving it is by using a WebView, which has support for panning, pinch-zooming etc. I think that image quality may be an issue though. android-local-image-in-webview android-add-image-to-webview-from-a-drawable etc. You can also generate and load the html dynamically


2

The specification for std::thread contains the following requirement (N4527 §30.3.1.2[thread.thread.constr]/6): Synchronization: The completion of the invocation of the constructor synchronizes with the beginning of the invocation of the copy of f. (where f is the callable entity which is to be executed on the newly created thread.) The constructor ...


2

There is a fundamental problem with undefined behavior of any kind: It is diagnosed by sanitizers and optimizers. A compiler can silently change behavior corresponding to those from one version to another (e.g. by expanding its repertoire), and suddenly you'll have some untraceable error in your program. This should be avoided. There is undefined behavior ...


3

What you are referring to is more likely implementation defined and not undefined behavior. The former is when the standard doesn't tell you what will happen but it should work the same if you are using the same compiler and the same platform. An example for this is assuming that an int is 4 bytes long. UB is something more serious. There the standard ...


0

The compiler might not be able to identify if the construction of std::regex is equal everytime it gets called (e.g. constructor could access a static/global variable). Thus the safe way would be to construct it in any case. On the other hand, compilers nowadays are very intelligent, maybe he parses the constructor deep enough to realize it must be constant ...


6

No, that's not safe. First of all, you will have to fix everything, not only the compiler version. I do not have particular examples, but I guess that a different (upgraded) OS, or even an upgraded processor might change UB results. Moreover, even having a different data input to your program can change UB behavior. For example, an out-of-bound array access ...


2

I know that the core dump is a memory dump of an executable file, No. A core dump in gdb (gcore indicates you're using this) is usually in ELF format, so there's an extensive header definining what maps to what. I'm not quite sure how much use GDB/linux makes of address space mangling when dumping cores, but you cannot assume file offset x will map to ...


2

I would consider putting the logic into a separate function. This helps to keep functions small and simple. std::string moodAtTime(Time time) { if(time==Morning) { // a real code should be here return "Good"; } else { return "bad"; } } std::string mood = moodAtTime(t); This reduces function length and splits the ...


2

Considering that I don't see the assembly code, I'm going to speculate the following : The allocation loop can be optimized (by the compiler) by removing the if clause and causing the following : for (int i=0;i <10000 ; i+=2) { pFigures[i] = new Square(...); } for (int i=1;i <10000 ; i +=2) { pFigures[i] = new Disk(...); } ...


1

You cannot define variable which is declared asextern. Extern only declares variable, saying it exists, not defines it. The variable should be defined in different place. So extern int x=1; is wrong. Header: extern int x; Somewhere in other place(probably other file): int x = 1; or int x; x = SomeFunction();


0

In addition to the answer of Baris Demiray I can personally recommend the callgrind tool (as well as any other tool) of the valgrind toolset. This is especially useful in combination with kcachegrind/qcachegrind which should be available through the ubuntu repositories. A very brief description of both tools, gprof and callgrind can be found here: ...


4

Both lines are perfectly fine, and end up with the same observable behaviour from the client code point of view: price is a default constructed variable of type CPrice, of course allocated on the stack. If you want to go into the technicalities, they are not identical: CPrice price; is a default initialization of a variable price of type CPrice. This is ...


-2

The two lines do exactly the same thing. They both call the default constructor (one with no arguments). Also valid could have been CPrice price();, as this and the first one you have allow you to push arguments if there is a constructor that takes them, whilst your second one would not. Also yes, if the new keyword is not used, then the allocation is on the ...


-3

You can use alloca for that: #include <iostream> #include <sstream> using namespace std::literals; int main() { void *mem = alloca(sizeof(std::string)); //Allocates memory on stack; no initialization std::string *mood; if(true){ // a real code should be here mood = new (mem) std::string("Good");//re assign the string } ...


0

You need to create application bundle that contains your application and all needed frameworks and libraries. Appication bundle is a directory with ".app" suffix and has next structure: AppName.app Contents MacOS Frameworks Resources ... Simple steps to deploy your application into bundle: Create AppName.app directory ...


2

It looks like you are passing -1 for the size, because 4294967295 corresponds to 0xFFFFFFFF, i.e. the negative one in two's complement representation. Since the only value that you pass to new [...] is vertexNum, that's the value that you need to check. Add a condition at the top of your functions to see if graph.vertexNum or pattern.vertexNum is negative, ...


2

What you want to do is called profiling and gprof on Linux is quite handy for that, see http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-gnuprof.html.


-2

You want to take a look at clock() (man 3 clock).


1

If you can use C++11 then you should at the very least use std::array, but probably std::vector. Then you can use this function #include <random> #include <stdexcept> #include <cstddef> #include <iterator> template <typename Container> typename Container::value_type random_member(const Container& values) { static ...



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