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The Windows CE and Windows Mobile (CE4.2 or CE5 based) standard file dialogs are restricted to \My Documents" plus one subdir below that and 'external' volumes, like SD Card or persistent storage. OEMs declare part of the flash store as persistent storage and use special names for thes like "\Flash File Store", "CK_FFS" and others. You can recognize these ...


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Whatever you do, do NOT use system("cls") It is OS dependent, terrible practice, and really not related to programming at all. For more information, check out: http://www.cplusplus.com/articles/j3wTURfi/ (Why system() is evil) There are three ways that I would suggest: The standard but slow way: void ClearScreen() { int n; for (n = 0; n < ...


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That's a lot of sub-questions. But since this an area that is often confusing newer OpenGL enthusiasts, let me try and provide some content that will hopefully help more people. I will intentionally skim over some details, like vertex attributes that are not sourced from a buffer, to avoid writing a book here. The key thing to understand is that a VAO is a ...


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I want to use stack as an my heap management system It is not possible in Java1. 1> ... except in the edge case where you are using JNI to call a native method, and the native method is doing it during the method call.


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You're only returning a string from the base case of the recursion, not all the other cases. Change the last line to: return replace(s);


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This can simply be done like this string replace(string s) { int len = s.length(); for(int i = 0; i < len; i++) { if(s[i] == ' ') s[i] = '*'; } return s; }


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You're allocated an array of size 1, but with (*p)p[0] = 0; (*p)p[1] = 1; you're writing beyond the end of the array. You're corrupting something, it maybe the heap info the array you are free'ing. I can't reproduce the the exact issue, but something pretty close. Adding guard to make sure that (*p)[x] is only assigned to when x It doesn't give ...


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In the simplest form, let us store one decimal digit per array index. So, if the number is say 120, then the array will have the numbers as follows: Say a[200] is how we declare the array, then a[0] = 0 a[1] = 2 a[2] = 1 The least significant digit is stored in the lowest index 0. The next one in index 1 and so on. Along with the array, we need an ...


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A pointer needs to assign the address first, in order to de-reference. Right now string* pointer is pointing to a garbage address! So when you assign the string foo, the program will say, I do not want "foo" to live in a dump! Then it crashes.


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*p = o; assigns o to the thing p points to. In your code p (or pointer) is uninitialized, so it assigns to god-knows-what, causing a crash (if you are lucky), or silently corrupting memory (if you aren't). p = &o; assigns the address of o to p, making p point to o. This is well-defined.


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use this pattern (?="\s*:) and replace w/ :string Demo


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I believe you could find the question at leetcode OJ named "Multiply Strings". This is my solution. Just for reference. Wish this will help :) class Solution { public: string multiply(string num1, string num2) { int s1(num1.size()), s2(num2.size()), size(s1+s2); vector<int> digit(size,0), carry(size,0); // digit: store current ...


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int n1[50], n2[50], out[51]; // n1 and n2 must be populated here int carry = 0; for (int cur = 49; cur >= 0; --cur) { out[cur+1] = n1[cur] * n2[cur] + carry; carry = out[cur+1] / 10; out[cur+1] %= 10; } out[0] = carry;


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The right-shift operator preserves the value of the left-most bit. If the left-most bit is 0 before the shift, it will still be 0 after the shift; if it is 1, it will still be 1 after the shift. This allow to preserve the value's sign. In your case, you combine 9 (0b1001) with 12 (0b1100), so you write 0b10011100 (0x9C). The bit #7 is 1. When byteToRead is ...


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From the official documentation: bool QDesktopServices::openUrl(const QUrl & url) [static] Opens the given url in the appropriate Web browser for the user's desktop environment, and returns true if successful; otherwise returns false. If the URL is a reference to a local file (i.e., the URL scheme is "file") then it will be opened with a ...


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The easiest would be to use this method: bool QProcess::startDetached(const QString & command) [static] This is an overloaded function. Starts the command command in a new process, and detaches from it. Returns true on success; otherwise returns false. Argument handling is identical to the respective start() overload. After the ...


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void CalculateCameraFrustrum(glm::mat4& projectionMatrix, glm::mat4 viewMatrix, // viewMatrix = light POV glm::vec3 camera // camera = eye position + eye direction float zNear, float zFar, ...


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There are multiple issues with your code: The function names are weird You are not checking against errors after the write system call. You are not checking against errors after the lseek system call. You are not checking against errors after the close system call. You inconsistently use the :: prefix for the close system call, but not the rest. You are ...


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Alright, here's the next part to my answer. (See answer below as well as original post for more info on creating a delimited list with regex_replace). Once you have your string formatted nicely, you can now use regex_search to break one line of the string apart into individual variables. #include "stdafx.h" #include <string> #include <regex> ...


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As 0x499602D2 states in comment, it is not possible without an extra dedicated template parameter. you may use your own deleter as follow: template <typename T, typename Enable = void> struct my_default_delete : public std::default_delete<T> {}; // default to std::default_delete<T> template <typename T> struct ...


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ios_base is in namespace std. Add prefix std:: before ios_base.


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The first step is to determine whether your program really needs admin privilege at all. Sometimes a program only runs with admin privilege, but for trivial reasons: a log file is being generated in the wrong place, for example, or a file that should be being opened for read-only access is being opened for full access. If that's the case you can fix the ...


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Looks like you got a plethora of answers while I was writing mine, but I might as well post my answer anyway so I don't feel like it was all for nothing... (all sizeof results taken from VC2012 - 32 bit build, pointer sizes would, of course, double with a 64 bit build) size_t f0(int* I); size_t f1(int I[]); size_t f2(int I[2]); int main(int argc, char** ...


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As Jarod42 suggested is perfectly okay, but i am not sure whether overflow will take place or not ? Try to store each and every digit of number in an array and after that multiply. You will definitely get the correct answer. For more detail how to multiply using array follow this post ...


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ints only hold 32 bits. When the result of a multiplication is larger than 2^31 - 1, the result rolls over to a large negative value. Instead of using the int data type, use long long int, which holds 64 bits.


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It's simple. You create a which has *val set to 0. Then you create b via b = a, which invokes copy constuctor. The copy constructor calls a.get(). A::get() increments the value pointed by val by 1 and then returns it. So a gets *val set to 1, and b gets back this value and also sets its own *val to 1. Then you print both by using get() which again ...


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b = a calls the initializer constructor (A(A &a)) for b using a, which gives both a and b a val of 1 (due to the get affecting a's val as well as returning that same value to initialize b's val). Then calling get in the cout statement turns both a's and b's vals to 2 and returns the 2.. and they print right next to each other, hence the 22.


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The result overflows the int (and also std::uint64_t) You have to use some BigInt library.


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I think one of your biggest problems is your mindset that C++ is a lower level language. You're taking rather the long way around on some of these things, and in the process making your own life quite a bit more difficult. I'd probably do the job more like this: std::ifstream in("dictionary.txt"); // read all the words from the file: ...


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You are trying to assign a value to an expression - which itself gives a value return day + (153 * month + 2) / 5 + 365 * year + year / 4 = 32083.5; remove " = 32083.5" part to give return day + (153 * month + 2) / 5 + 365 * year + year / 4;


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What the C++ standard says about this (section 14.8.1): [ Note: Because the explicit template argument list follows the function template name, and because conversion member function templates and constructor member function templates are called without using a function name, there is no way to provide an explicit template argument list for these ...


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How about this int len = dictionary.size(); bool flag = true; for(int i = 0; i < len; i++) { if(dictionary[i] == word) { flag = false; break; } } if(flag) cout<<word<<"\n"; else ;


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You condition should be: std::find(dictionary.begin(), dictionary.end(), word) == dictionary.end() Note that in your case, you may use a map instead and then use dictionary.count(word) == 0


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Yes, that's guaranteed. C++14 [class.dtor]/8: After executing the body of the destructor and destroying any automatic objects allocated within the body, a destructor for class X calls the destructors for X’s direct non-variant non-static data members, the destructors for X’s direct base classes and, if X is the type of the most derived class (12.6.2), ...


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After digging for quite a while I was able to find this method which I was able to use to build this functionality: ssh_pki_export_pubkey_base64(ssh_key, char*) This converts an ssh_key into its base64 equivalent.


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int A[2][2] = {0,1,2,3}; A is an array of 4 ints. For the coder's convenience, he has decided to declare it as a 2 dimensional array so compiler will allow coder to access it as a two dimensional array. Coder has initialized all elements linearly as they are laid in memory. As usual, since A is an array, A is itself the address of the array so A + 1 (after ...


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int A[2][2] = {0,1,2,3}; int A[2][2] = {{0,1},{2,3}}; These two are equivalent. Both mean: "I declare a two dimentional array of integers. The array is of size 2 by 2". Memory however is not two dimensional, it is not laid out in grids, but (conceptionaly) in one long line. In a multi-dimensional array, each row is just allocated in memory right after ...


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I think that what you need is: std::ifstream maze(filename); std::size_t rowCount, colCount; maze >> rowCount >> colCount; std::vector<std::vector<char>> content(rowCount, std::vector<char>(colCount)); for (auto &columns : content) { for (auto& c : columns) { maze >> c; } } if really you want to ...


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I guess that there is some misunderstanding of what we have and what we want to get. The case is that, the direction vector does not uniquely determines the orientation of the body in space. To make this statement clear, let's get a closer look at how can the rotations be represented in 3D space. Rotations about the origin have three degrees of freedom. ...


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With this line you have a pointer to a pointers of chars. char **contents = new char * [*rows * *cols]; Now you have a lot of char pointers which you have to allocate memory. You can do it like this: for (int r = 0; r < *rows; r++) { for (int c = 0; c < *cols; c++) { contents[r][c] = new char[SIZE_OF_STRING]; } } Or you can ...


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Pay attention to what you are doing. curl_easy_perform() returns an error code, not the server's response data. You are passing Curl's error code to Document::Parse(), not the actual JSON data. The error messages are telling you exactly that: error: no matching function for call to 'rapidjson::GenericDocument >::Parse(CURLcode&)' By default, ...


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Create a helper function and call it: void triangle_helper(int maxrow) { triangle(maxrow, 0); } You can further rename triangle_helper to triangle, and triangle to triangle_impl for example, and/or put it in some private namespace. Demo


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Proper hints are: use contiguous allocations reserve up front This answer contains a good side-by-side comparison of different allocation techniques with Boost managed_shared_memory: How do I measure the size of a boost interprocess vector in shared memory? In your particular case you could flatten the allocation by using flat_map and use pool ...


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The following void InputText(char A[140], string prompt) is in fact void InputText(char* A, std::string prompt) You may pass array by reference that way: void InputText(char (&A)[140], std::string prompt) { cout << prompt; cin.ignore(); cin.getline(A, 140); } and similarly int numElements(char (&A)[140]) { int numEl = ...


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The a array is not null terminated and that leads to undefined behavior. In your case it printed 13. It could print out something else or even crash with an access violation. You should add the '\0' as the last char in your array A to terminate the string so you will know where the end of the array data is like in your if statement A[i]=='\0' Also (not ...


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The other answers have covered the other declarations but I will explain why you don't need the braces in the first two initializations. The reason why these two initializations are identical: int A[2][2] = {0,1,2,3}; int A[2][2] = {{0,1},{2,3}}; is because it's covered by aggregate initialization. Braces are allowed to be "elided" (omitted) in this ...


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Ok I will try it to explain it to you: This is a initialization. You create a two dimensional array with the values: A[0][0] -> 0 A[0][1] -> 1 A[1][0] -> 2 A[1][1] -> 3 This is the exactly the same like above, but here you use braces. Do it always like this its better for reading. int **A means you have a pointer to a pointer of ints. When you do new ...


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For the array declaration, the first specified dimension is the outermost one, an array that contains other arrays. For the pointer declarations, each * adds another level of indirection. The syntax was designed, for C, to let declarations mimic the use. Both the C creators and the C++ creator (Bjarne Stroustrup) have described the syntax as a failed ...


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int A[2][2] = {0,1,2,3}; int A[2][2] = {{0,1},{2,3}}; These declare A as array of size 2 of array of size 2 of int. The declarations are absolutely identical. int **A = new int*[2]; This declares a pointer to pointer to int initialized with an array of two pointers. You should allocate memory for these two pointers as well if you want to use it as ...


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You seem to have some highly specific assumptions about how Boost Serialization should serialize to it's proprietary, non-portable binary format. Boost serialization is much more highlevel, more or less specifically designed to deal with non-POD data. If you insist, you should be able to serialize an array of your POD type directly. In your question, ...



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