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You cannot do it directly, but you can always calculate it, using one of the sparse solvers. The idea is to solve A*X=I, where I is the identity matrix. If there is a solution, X will be your inverse matrix. The eigen documentation has a page about sparse solvers and how to use them, but the basic steps are as follows: ...


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With XCode 5, you can use -parallelizeTargets and -jobs NUMBER with xcodebuild. According to xcodebuild --help: -parallelizeTargets build independent targets in parallel -jobs NUMBER specify the maximum number of concurrent build operations


-1

You can initialize in class (like in your example) only static const PODs. If you change it's type then it's no longer possible. You can do: in header in class declaration: static int N; somewhere in *.cpp: int RandMT::N = 222; and then you can simply change value by RandMT::N = ... in function code.


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template <size_t MAX> class var { ... private: int a; int b[MAX]; }; In each template instantiation MAX is a constant that can be used on loops. Then you can construct vars whith any length. var<7> v7; var<100> v100; Or typedef them tyedef var<10> myVar;


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You can simply get it's address by a.usedData = &arg; but... arg is temporary object (created only for this call). Are you sure, you won't get with this pointer out of scope?


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Use the reference operator (aka address-of): a.usedData = &arg; I can't imagine why you need this, but it can be done that way. Edit: depending on how you instantiate the string, you may have to use std::string* copy = new std::string(arg); a.usedData = copy; If your original arg is not allocated through new it may go out of scope and be ...


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for 3 remaining chars i would do it quickly by char, no need for strings const char* find = strrchr(filename, '.'); if(!(find!=0 && *(++find)=='a' && *(++find)=='a' && *(++find)=='c')) printf("file %s is not .aac\n", filename); btw. you got me for a sec whit leaving out the trailing r (strrchr) :-)


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ok so the manual attempt on the command line turned out not to be the exact same command line text, I was not using the enclosing "" for the psexec and toolB executables. leaving the enclosing "" out for the psexec executable worked, so apparently _wsystem does not tolerate enclosing the first parameter with "". which is weird because then if psexec is ...


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I have the answer ! I have forget to set the database fot the Query. It must look like : model->setQuery("SELECT id, Nachname, Vorname, Ort FROM testtable", database);


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First off, note that the cast you've used would create a temporary object. You probably meant this: baz.something(static_cast<Bar&>(baz)); And to answer your question, it should be possible to use SFINAE for this: struct Baz : Foo, Bar { virtual void something(const Bar &bar) { /* ... */ } template < class T, class = ...


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It's not mathematically meaningful. A sparse matrix does not necessarily have a sparse inverse. That's why the method is not available.


0

Typechecking happens during compilation, and the name-mangling that ensures different functions with different types have different names are based on the base-type and name of the class, so should give the same name for both your examples. However, what you have to contend with is that GetDescription(Animal animal_key, char* buffer, int& ...


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I guess there is an overlap in the out matrix when you compute the results: out(Rect(x,y,r,r)) overlaps out(Rect(x+,y+1,r,r)) for r > 1. So in the sequential execution, the last computed results following your sequential scan of the image are always stored in the output matrix, while in the parallel computation, the scan of the image is not sequential ...


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if you need "char**" instead std::vector, you should to allocate memory for it before filling default values. Like this, bool PhoneBook::setDefault() { ........ mNumber = new char*[5]; // allocating memory for mNumber for (uint8 i = 0; i < 5; ++i) { mNumber[i] = new char[4]; for (uint8 k = 0; k < 4; ++k) { mNumber[i][k] = ...


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cv::Mat image = cv::imread(argv[1]); cv::Mat gray; cv::cvtColor(image, gray, CV_BGR2GRAY); PIX *pixS = pixCreate(gray.size().width, gray.size().height, 8); for(int i=0; i<gray.rows; i++) for(int j=0; j<gray.cols; j++) pixSetPixel(pixS, j,i, (l_uint32) gray.at<uchar>(i,j));


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The Atmel processor disables interrupts when an interrupt is taken: (Section 4.4: Bit 7 – I: Global Interrupt Enable) The Global Interrupt Enable bit must be set for the interrupts to be enabled. The individual interrupt enable control is then performed in separate control registers. If the Global Interrupt Enable Register is cleared, none of the ...


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This advice is still good. You should not expose these fields. Instead, you should either: Declare "LinkedList" as a friend of "Node" Move "Node" into "LinkedList" (Personally I recommend putting "Node" in a "details" or "internal" namespace, adding "LinkedList" as a friend of Node, and creating a "typedef details::Node Node" in the private section of ...


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If I understand the question correctly, you want to get the size of an array, and use as a template argument. For that, you can use size(), since it is a constexpr. Something like this : #include <iostream> #include <array> typedef std::array< int, 72 > myArray; template< int N = myArray().size() > struct A { void foo() { ...


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You only ever set mNumber to NULL so any access to memory via mNumber, mNumber [j][k] for example, is most likely going to crash with an access violation (1). You need to initialise mNumber to be a meaningful value, by using new somewhere! Better still, use a standard container like std::vector: // the declaration of mNumber, do not initialise mNumber to ...


1

Is this what you're trying to do? #include <iostream> #include <array> template <typename T, size_t N> void f(std::array<T, N>& a) { std::cout << N << '\n'; } int main() { std::array<int, 34> a; f(a); }


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Yes. The member functions (on Visual Studio 2010 at least) size() and max_size() both return the number of items. #include "stdafx.h" #include <array> #include <iostream> template<class T> int tuple_size(T t) { return std::tuple_size<T>::value; } int main() { std::array<int, 4> nums; std::cout << "size(): ...


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First you need your methods prototypes to match the ones the lib was designed for, but usually also the packagename and class name have to match as well. You can get what symbols are declared inside your .so file using readelf from binutils: readelf -s libYourLib.so The symbols to look for are starting with Java_ followed by the package name, then the ...


1

Classic mistake, but the error message already says it: function std::string b() /.


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It's actually a function declaration. It's possible to declare local functions but not to define them. So therefore it's not possible to explicitly call the default constructor.


2

Condensing your code to string b();, what you're doing here is declaring a prototype to a function called b that returns a string and takes no arguments. The commas in the "compound declaration" are obfuscating this.


2

The easiest way to get an event loop in QThread is to not subclass it. The default implementation of QThread::run() calls QThread::exec() which starts an event loop. This means the code which is currently in your run() override would have to go into a separate worker class, meaning you separate the actual work from the thread control, which also makes your ...


1

There are several things wrong here. Your main function should probably look like this: int main() { while (response() == 'y') { //must have either an empty body or a semicolon here, //otherwise our return statement will become the loop body! } return 0; } Also, your response() function should return the local variable response so ...


1

You can't access the function local response variable in main(). In this line while (response=='y') response is interpreted as the address of the response() function, compared to 'y' which causes the error you see. As others mentioned you should rather have something like this char response (){ cout<<" Continue loop function?\n"; cout ...


0

While is waiting for a boolean. In order to compare 'y' to response, you must change the return type from void to char : char response (){ cout<<" Continue loop function?\n"; cout <<"y - yes\nn - no\n"; char response='y'; cin>> response; return response; }


3

It is perfectly valid as vector::iterator is a random access iterator. You can perform arithmetic operations on it and it is not platform dependent. std::vector<double>::iterator it = A.end(); while (it != A.begin()){ --it; //this will skip A.end() and loop will break after processing A.front() //do something with 'it' } But A.end() refers ...


0

Did you check the value of GetLastError()? Also your if condition is re-initializing hcomm to invalid handle.


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It's almost safe if you are mindful of some exceptional cases: A.end() gives you an iterator denoting the position just beyond the end of the std::vector. You should not attempt to dereference it. If the vector has zero elements then A.end() - 1 is not well-defined. In all other cases it is and you can indeed perform pointer arithmetic so long as you are ...


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The initializer in a new expression has to be of the same form as that for variable initialization (cf. [expr.new]). This means that for arrays, only three forms are allowed: T * p1 = new T[N]; // default-initialization T * p2 = new T[N](); // value-initialization T * p3 = new T[N] { a, b, c }; // list-initialization The meaning of ...


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You can use std::find function present in the <algorithm> header. Refer to this link to understand the usage of this function: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/find/


1

how about Person* p = new Person[5]{7, 7, 7, 7, 7}; ?


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You should explicitly cast to QObject * : QObject *item = qobject_cast< QObject * >( view.rootObject() ); Also make sure you have included QGraphicsObject : #include <QGraphicsObject>


1

Well, if iterator is on the last element of the container then *(it+1) has undefined behavior. You should check that it+1 != end before dereferencing it.


0

Please note the following locations in your code, marked with // LOOK HERE: class loc{ int iVAL; public: loc(int i) { cout<<"inside parameter constructor"<<endl; iVAL = i; } loc() { iVAL = 0; cout<<"inside default constructor"<<endl; } // LOOK HERE // this ...


1

Well. That's really quite simple; You're rejecting the tasks posted! template< typename Task > void run_task(task task){ boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock( mutex_ ); if(0 < available_) { --available_; io_service_.post(boost::bind(&tpool::wrap_task, this, boost::function< void() > ( task ))); } } ...


1

Actually it's a solution suggested by @Andreas in comments to the question. My contribution is pointing to another mistake in the name filter. Solution: how to show all dirs + files filtered by extension Use flag QDir::AllDirs. According to docs this flag is intented to avoid applying the filter to folders. setFilter(QDir::Files | QDir::AllDirs | ...


0

This is because of ob3 = ++ob1; Look at this code more carefully loc operator++(){ cout<<"inside pre incriment"< So what can you do to avoid this extra copy.. You can return by reference const loc& operator++(){ cout<<"inside pre incriment"<<endl; ++iVAL; return *this; <--- you create a new copy and send ...


0

Try SIFT instead of SURF. Some claim that SURF is more robust, but according to my personal experiences and the recent trend in the CV community SIFT is still the way to go. Also, you could use some density clustering method to further filter out some outliers, assuming you are only trying to find one object in the target image. A good example of using ...


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OpenvCV is a good choice for image processing that has C++, C, Python and Java interfaces and supports Windows, Linux, Mac OS, iOS and Android. OpenCV was designed for computational efficiency and with a strong focus on real-time applications. Written in optimized C/C++ . and with python it can be very interesting and powerful ! you can find a good Tutorial ...


0

Custom conversion operators can be defined only for classes and structs. You can't define them for the built-in types. Also, custom conversion operators cannot be non-member functions. That limits where they can be defined and what object types they can be defined for.


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Like many other things in C++, "because C does it that way". (And many things in C are the way they are because B or BCPL did it that way.) In C++ as in C void foo(int p[10]); is equivalent to void foo(int p[]); which is equivalent to void foo(int *p); That is, the parameter looks like an array, but is actually a pointer. An array argument to this ...


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Generating barcode with Qt is quite easy - as Reverend Gonzo pointed out, you use a barcode font. Then you can paint it with QPainter onto anything. Or print it. I wrote a post/tutorial on generating code128 with Qt, github example included. How to generate barcode with a font in Qt


1

Scenario 2, a method of finding two matching items of arbitrary value, is indeed “quadratic”. Each pass looking for a match of one candidate against all the rest of the elements is O(n). But you repeat that n times. The value of n drops as you go so a detailed number of comparisons would be closer to n+(n-1)+(n-2)+ … 1 which is (n+1)×(n/2) or ½(n²+n) but ...


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The class is located in the namespace std as well as all other C++ standard library classes / functions. So you have to change complex to std::complex<T> (don't forget the template parameter!).


1

You're right on both questions… but it would help to explain things a bit more rigorously. I don't know what the standards of your class are; you probably don't need an actual proof, but showing more detailed reasoning than "we aren't multiplying or dividing by two" never hurts. So… In the first question, there's clearly nothing happening here but ...


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As its name indicates, std::copy is for copying objects from one place to another. That is the reason it does not provide a transforming interface. When a transformation from one type to another is required, the std::transform should be used. This allows you to provide a unary operation to implement the transformation from objects of one type to the other: ...



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