New answers tagged

0

The OP wrote in an edit: It wasn't easy, but R. Martinho Fernandes set me on the right path. And I don't think it's threadsafe, but it works so far. What I wanted was the ability to track and update floats just by changing the type to mnFloat. And I set up a define that calls a function in my manager to add the file, line, and function names, then ...


0

The general answer is that you cannot do what you say you want to the way you want to do it. However, depending on what your goal is there might be ways to achieve it. (You also haven't mentioned which development environment you use.) 1) You could create different targets for the different versions that include the different cpp files. Most C++ ...


1

Adding some historical context to rici's excellent answer. If you can get your hands on a working copy of gcc 2.7.2.3, experiment with its preprocessor. At that time the preprocessor was a separate program from the compiler, and it used a very naive algorithm for text serialization, which tended to insert far more spaces than were necessary. When Neil ...


0

There are 9 phases of translation. Is my assumption correct that, first the preprocessor will search/replace all occurrences of COMMA and second the compiler will instantiate any templates in that order? The COMMA token is substituted in phase 4. The templates are instantiated in phase 8.


0

It`s incorrect, compilers can not manipulate floating point numbers at compile time. If you are satisfied with 3276 value at compile time then you are good to go, but there is no way compiler going to evaluate this at compile time with floating point precision. Floating points are too tricky for compilers to optimize, because optimizing a floating point ...


1

Well written c code, is arranged like a pyramid, with the main file in the top. Dependencies (function calls, enums, consts, etc.) will run downward in the pyramid. Never upward. This will help you maintain, extend and test your code in the future. If you collapse all your header files, you'll also collapse the pyramid. You might as well, collapse the c-...


0

To include a predefined library header file , #include<filename> is used whereas to include user defined header file, #include "filename" is relevant.


0

Are there any down sides doing thing this way? Compilation time may increase, especially if the resulting monolithic header file is large. Also, there is a small risk of name collisions. A header might declare some function, and one of the source files (which doesn't currently include that header) might have a static function with the same name - this ...


1

Don't think that this is good idea. You also can combine all 60 .c files into one file. But, there are a lot of reasons of this source and header files structure. You should make try to understand the project structure.


0

You last example works after minor tweaks. The idea in the book is to have your program parse the command line options and set the value of a global variable named Debug. #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #define DEBUG(level, fmt, ...) do if (Debug >= level) fprintf(stderr, fmt, __VA_ARGS__); while (0) int Debug = 1; // default debug ...


0

The definition of the template class xzcMutatorECB128 is wrong. If your want to define a template class, you may not know the data type of it in the compiling time. On the other hand, the data or function in the class should be either public or private or protected.


0

This is not possible in standard C++. Preprocessor directives, like #define and the #x stringifying operator -- they get executed in the preprocessing phase of compilation. The "#" stringifying operator gets executed, and replaces its parameter with the stringified version during the preprocessing phase. Compilation and optimization does not ...


1

No, there is no way to do this without some third-party application. Neither GCC nor clang include this functionality, which is why third-party tools exist.


0

This is a fairly old question, but I think there has been significant improvements in this area that are not so widely known (yet). Metashell can be used like a sort of gdb for template instantiations. This (as far as I know) builds on clang tooling.


1

Just finally answering this question. The answer is: you don't need to. I've noticed that. The defines already works just fine. If you're compiling a C code for another platform, the cross compiler will take care of redefining de defines, so your system will always know what system is if you use the preprocessor directives. But if for, some reason you ...


0

bin_PROGRAMS = prog1 prog2 prog3 prog1_SOURCES = a.c x.c prog1_CPPFLAGS = -DPROG1 prog2_SOURCES = a.c y.c prog2_CPPFLAGS = -DPROG2 prog3_SOURCES = a.c z.c prog3_CPPFLAGS = -DPROG3 But to use this you need to make sure you call AM_PROG_CC_C_O in your configure.ac, since a.c is then compiled three times with different options.


0

It makes use of the macro act like a real statement or function call. A statement is either { expression-list } or expression; so that poses a problem when defining macros that need more than one expression, because if you use { } then a syntax error will occur if the caller of the macro quite reasonably adds a ; before an else. if(whatever) f(x); else ...


3

Why not resort to something that uses a macros? See swap So the code could be std::swap(x,y); with type safety etc.


3

swapmacro(int, 4, 5); expands to this: {int temp = 4; 4 = 5; 5 = temp;}; Neither 4 = 5 nor 5 = temp are valid expressions. Integer literals cannot be lvalues. Perhaps you meant to do this: swapmacro(int, x, y);


2

This requires rather tricky machinery (see this answer for more details), since you cannot normally have recursive macros in C: #define _NUM_ARGS2(X,X5,X4,X3,X2,X1,N,...) N #define NUM_ARGS(...) _NUM_ARGS2(0,__VA_ARGS__,5,4,3,2,1,0) // be sure to add X6,X7,... and 6,7,... to support more arguments #define GCD_OF_1(a) (a) #define GCD_OF_2(a,...


1

Simplest solution? Create three different rules for three different object files all built from the a.c source file. Then each rule can easily add extra flags needed for the specific build.


0

It is difficult to make a real variadic macro to work in VS2013. I had something done to expand a macro to be interpreted on it's own as a new macro. The key is to make multiple level macros. It is a lot to code but for given sample it will work. #define InitialMacro (argument1, argument2) \ DetailedMacro(argument1, argument2, argument1##_description, ...


0

The C preprocessor does not provide any mechanism to get the length of a string literal. However, with gcc/clang in C99 or C11 mode, and using the -Wall option, you can force a compiler warning by inserting something like: static void validateSTRING(void) { (void)(char[MAX_STRING_LENGTH]){STRING}; } (Note: the use of MAX_STRING_LENGTH was deliberate. ...


3

You can't do it in the preprocessor. The best you can do is to get a compile time constant. sizeof("string literal") - 1 will be the same as strlen("string literal") You can then use _Static_assert from C11 to do a compile time check: _Static_assert(sizeof(STRING) - 1 < MAX_STRING_LENGTH, "you need to extend the value of MAX_STRING_LENGTH")


0

CIL (C Intermediate Language) has a 'merger' feature which I've successfully used for some simple merge operations. I've used it to merge moderately complicated programs - around a hundred files in different folders. Of course, if your codebase includes any C++ the CIL merger won't be able to merge that.


0

For a generic foreach: http://saadahmad.ca/cc-preprocessor-metaprogramming-2/ This is exactly what you need, albeit it's well above 200-300 bytes. Still, it's worth reading. If you just want to generate the above functions, however, I'd just say: #include <iostream> using namespace std; #define _CAT( x, y ) x ## y #define CAT( x, y ) ...


2

The #if pre-processor directive is evaluated during the pre-processing stages. The function pow is evaluated in run-time. Therefore you can't use it inside pre-processor tokens (macros) that are passed to #if. You'll want to compute all these values at compile-time. Hint: "2 times n" is the same as 1 << n (bit-wise left shift). In addition, there ...


0

Here is what I came up with: #define DOCTEST_CONCAT_IMPL(s1, s2) s1##s2 #define DOCTEST_CONCAT(s1, s2) DOCTEST_CONCAT_IMPL(s1, s2) #define DOCTEST_NUM_DUMMIES 243 int all() { int accum = 0; #if defined(DOCTEST_NUM_DUMMIES) #define DOCTEST_FWD_AND_CALL(x) int x(); accum += x(); #define DOCTEST_GEN_10(x) \ DOCTEST_FWD_AND_CALL(DOCTEST_CONCAT(...


0

you can use an integer variable initialized to 1. multiply the #define with this variable and print the value of variable.


10

The C standard doesn't specify this behaviour, since the output of the preprocessing phase is simply a stream of tokens and whitespace. Serializing the stream of tokens back into a character string, which is what gcc -E does, is not required or even mentioned by the standard, and does not form part of the translation processs specified by the standard. In ...


0

The problem is, the preprocessor doesn't know or care whether you are calling SetString or defining a SetString overload. Clearly, the reason the preprocessor is being used is that it it oblivious to the namespace. A good approach is to bite the bullet and retarget the entire large application to use a different namespace api_wrapped_ns instead of api_ns. ...


1

First of all it would look better if you write: #ifdef _WIN32 ... #endif because _WIN32 is defined for all Windows C++/C compilers. Next Windows doesn't support GCC per se. It does have a minimalistic port called MinGW. And because of that you should write: #ifdef __MINGW32__ ... #endif


5

You misunderstand the rules slightly. It's fine for you to use something that has (or hasn't) been #DEFINEd by your toolchain, even if it starts with two underscores. It's certainly not fine for your to #DEFINE something starting with two underscores yourself. This is a useful convention; it means that your source code cannot clash with the way your ...


1

The problem was that ## concatenates string, and the arguments to RealPart() and ImagPart() aren't strings. The correct macro definitions are #define RealPart(c) c.re #define ImagPart(c) c.im It was a bit too obvious for me.


0

You seem to want to achieve that using only #defines, but I'm almost completely sure that it's impossible. But if you'd allow those values to be constexprs, then you'd be able to do following. (And it's probably a best thing you can get without external tools.) #define DEFS \ C(XY_ABC_FOO, 1) \ C(XY_ABC_BAR, 3) \ C(XY_ABC_PIPPO, 5) \ ...


1

You could do it with awk: awk '/^#define XY_ABC_\w+ \d+$/ { if(line) { line = line ", " $2 } else { line = "std::vector<int> defs = { " $2 } END { print line " };" }' < header.hpp > defs.hpp Then in your main program use #include defs.hpp to get the declaration.


2

Use the -xdumpmacros option. Per the Solaris Studio 12.4 C User's Guide: B.2.105 -xdumpmacros[=value[,value...]] Use this option when you want to see how macros are behaving in your program. This option provides information such as macro defines, undefines, and instances of usage. It prints output to the standard error (stderr), based on the ...


0

You could put the #pragma message in a separate file you only include once from config.h. gcc might print these pragmas even when inside a false conditional, but it won't include a file from inside a false conditional. So someting like this: /* config.h */ #ifndef CONFIG_H #define CONFIG_H #ifndef CONFIG_MESSAGE_PRINTED #define CONFIG_MESSAGE_PRINTED #...


1

The answer by @Adrian is correct, but I think is missing the point, as are the comments. Look at the code sample: self.scopeDisplayNames = @[S(SPTAuthUserReadPrivateScope), S(SPTAuthUserReadEmailScope)]; SPTAuthUserReadPrivateScope is a global constant of type NSString * in the Spotify SDK. The macro call: S(SPTAuthUserReadPrivateScope) expands to: @"...


1

To understand this phenomenon, you may to refer into the C standard (I believe that C++ is similar to C in that manner). In particular it's in translation phases section (C11 draft §5.1.1.2). The preprocessor is obligated to behave just like as the phases are executed in the top-down order (i.e. step 3 is executed after step 2 has finished completely etc.). ...


2

The problem is that the c-preprocessor just adds another line ending character when the \ is hit and continuated. Within // comments you can't do that. The \ character isn't accepted to continuate the comment (it's supposed to appear as a single line anyway). The solution is,- as you found out yourself -, to use the /**/ comment style.


3

It declares a macro function that turns the parameter into a NSString literal. For example, S(hi) would expand to @"hi". For reference: https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Macro-Arguments.html https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Stringification.html And to answer your second question, there is no way to do this in Swift that I am aware of. It's not a good ...


2

The #define has no role in this; the problem is that you are passing a double when printf is expecting an int (due to the %d specifier); technically that is undefined behavior, so anything is allowed to happen. Now, if this was built on 32 bit x86 probably you would get an int reinterpretation of the lower 32 bits of you float, since all parameters are ...


0

It can work but the thing is why to make your code complicated like take for example you can easily do 1+3 rather than using macros. Though appriciated for such thinking.


1

Yes, you can, almost exactly like your attempt: #define OPERATION(operator) 1 operator 3


2

It seems like not possible in standard C++ Problem 0: Only standard way of textual inclusion is #include directive. Problem 1: String literal is a preprocessing token, which are recognised in phase 3, so when preprocessing directives are executed in phase 4, it is already determined that #include is a part of string literal and not a preprocessing ...


-3

I think you just confused the syntax; the following correctly assigns a raw string literal into a std::string variable: #include <iostream> #include <string> int main() { std::string raw = // #include "text.txt" std::cout << raw << std::endl; return 0; } where text.txt is: R"( A B C )";


0

OK, I think I've figured this out. I mentioned in my question that the custom build tool that I was using had originally been auto-generated by the Qt Visual Studio add-in. It had the form: "$(QT32)\bin\moc.exe" "%(FullPath)" -o ".\GeneratedFiles\moc_%(Filename).cpp" -DUNICODE -DWIN32 -DQT_LARGEFILE_SUPPORT -DQT_THREAD_SUPPORT -DQT_CORE_LIB "-I$(QT32)\...


7

enum is a C/C++ keyword, not a pre-processor directive. Pre-processor directives are clearly denoted by a leading # symbol. The pre-processor doesn't have/know a symbol called TT_LAST_PARM etc, and according to the C++ standard (§16.1 ¶4): After all replacements due to macro expansion and the defined unary operator have been performed, all remaining ...


1

From the documentation (emphasis mine): Another limitation is that moc does not expand macros, so you for example cannot use a macro to declare a signal/slot or use one to define a base class for a QObject. [...] Since moc doesn't expand #defines, type macros that take an argument will not work in signals and slots. Here is an illegal example: #...



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