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210

The author of this code presumably had to support EBCDIC at some point, where the numeric values of the letters are non-contiguous (gaps exist between I, J and R, S, as you may have guessed). It is worth noting that the C and C++ standards only guarantee that the characters 0 to 9 have contiguous numeric values for precisely this reason, so neither of these ...


177

On most compilers the maximum value of an unsigned short is 65535. Any value above that gets wrapped around, so 65536 becomes 0, and 65600 becomes 65. This means that long strings of the right length (e.g. 65600) will pass the check, and overflow the buffer. Use size_t to store the result of strlen(), not unsigned short, and compare len to an expression ...


71

... is an extension provided by GCC https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Designated-Inits.html#Designated-Inits To initialize a range of elements to the same value, write [first ... last] = value. This is a GNU extension. For example, int widths[] = { [0 ... 9] = 1, [10 ... 99] = 2, [100] = 3 }; && is another extension ...


53

Looks like it attempts to cover both EBCDIC and ASCII. Your alternative method doesn't work for EBCDIC (it has false positives, but no false negatives) C and C++ do require that '0'-'9' are contiguous. Note that the standard library calls do know whether they run on ASCII, EBCDIC or other systems, so they're more portable and possibly more efficient.


41

C declarations are decoded from inside out using a simple rule: start from the identifier and check on the right side for [] (array) or () (function) then check on the left side for the type of the values (stored in the array or returned by the function), without crossing the parentheses; escape from the parentheses and repeat. For example: void (*p)() p ...


40

It is the null character code '\0'. Certain editors like vi display it as ^@. sizeof("apple") would return 6 because it includes the null character used to terminate strings.


36

You can initialize arrays in both ways. Using curly inner braces are optional, but it's recommended, cause they improve the readibility. The easiest way to find the value of the element of non-formated with braces multi-dimensional array is by splitting the array. For example, your array's dimensions are 2x3x2: First split the array into 2 sets (2x3x2) ...


35

The ^@ is the way an ASCII NUL is commonly represented in printable form. That is the same as the @ character with some bits removed: @ = 0100 ^@ = 0 and it is the same as '\0' (the string terminator in C). Because it is the string terminator, you would not see it from printf or its related functions, but you can readily create it using the ...


34

Label names do not interfere with other identifiers, because they are only used in gotos. A variable and a label can have the same name, and in standard C and C++ it's always clear from the context what is meant. So this is perfectly valid: name: int name; name = 4; // refers to the variable goto name; // refers to the label The distinction between ...


32

C++ has evolved from C where switch statements were conceived as a Jump Table (Branch Table). To implement as jump tables, the switch conditions should be constant such that it can easily be translated to a label. Though the standard never dictates how the switch statements should be implemented but, most importantly, the case labels should be such that it ...


30

You could use a typedef instead of a struct: typedef char* string; string s = "hello"; But then const string would make the pointer const, and not the pointed-to data. So const string s is equivalent to char* const s. A solution may be to define an additional type for const strings: typedef char* string; typedef const char* const_string; For the ...


27

It's important to understand that no modern operating system tracks the position of line breaks within a file. (VMS could, and I'm pretty sure so could some IBM mainframe operating systems, but you're probably not using any of those.) So it's not possible to seek to a line boundary. It is also not possible to read byte-by-byte in reverse order. ...


26

The problem is here: strncpy(buffer,str,strlen(str)); ^^^^^^^^^^^ If the string is greater than the length of the target buffer, strncpy will still copy it over. You are basing the number of characters of the string as the number to copy instead of the size of the buffer. The correct way to do this is as follows: strncpy(buffer,str, ...


24

RVO/NRVO are clearly allowed under the "as-if" rule in C. In C++ you can get observable side-effects because you've overloaded the constructor, destructor, and/or assignment operator to give those side effects (e.g., print something out when one of those operations happens), but in C you don't have any ability to overload those operators, and the built-in ...


23

I believe the latter can have appeared due to cargo-culting, i.e. the rule/reflex to always put preprocessor definitions in parentheses for good measure.


21

In addition to other answers, I'd like to point out that the problem can be solved in O(1) without additional memory, and without modifying the contents of the input string. First, do strnlen(str, 256). If you get more than 255, return 0. By the pigeonhole principle, some character must occur more than once. This operation takes only O(1) since we examine ...


21

Yes, it is the same. If there are less number of initializers than the elements in the array, then the remaining elements will be initialized as if the objects having static storage duration, (i.e., with 0). So, char buf[5]={0,}; is equivalent to char buf[5]={0,0,0,0,0}; Related Reading : From the C11 standard document, chapter 6.7.9, ...


21

In C, there is simply no rule scope for enums and struct. The place where you define your enum doesn't have any importance. In C++, define something inside another something (like an enum in a class) make this something belonging to the another something. If you want to make your enum global in C++, you will have to define it outside your class, or access ...


20

The reason why it's covered a lot for C++ is because in C++, RVO has side effects (ie. not calling the destructor of the temporary objects nor the copy constructor or assignment operator of the resulting objects). In C, there's no possible side effect, only potential performance improvements. I see no reason such an optimization couldn't be performed by ...


20

No, it's still O(n^2). You just slightly improved the constant. You still have to make two loops- basically the naive count the loops way of measuring big O time should tell you this. Also, there is no such thing as O(n+1/2n). Big O notation is to give you an idea of the order of magnitude something should take. n+1/2n= 1.5n. Since big O drops all ...


20

There is no difference. The only operators with higher priority are ::, ++ and -- and they are not applicable on 0 nor (0). The only funny difference I see is obfuscation : #define NULL (0) void f(int x) { // Do something with x } int main() { f NULL; // This code compiles return 0; }


19

Use the format specifier %p: printf("variable A is at address: %p\n", (void*)&A); The standard requires that the argument is of type void* for %p specifier. Since, printf is a variadic function, there's no implicit conversion to void * from T * which would happen implicitly for any non-variadic functions in C. Hence, the cast is required. To quote ...


18

They're claiming two things, not one thing that is "modified". It's like saying "a quick red car"; the car is quick and red, it's not having a fast color. It's parallel, because it supports parallel programming It's a super-set, because every valid C or C++ program is also a valid Concurrent C program. That's a bit weird too, since not every valid C ...


18

Both of the streams (stdout and output) are buffered. Nothing actually gets written until they are flushed. Since you are not explicitly flushing them, nor arranging for them to be automatically flushed, they are only being auto-flushed when they are closed. You are also not explicitly closing them, so they're being closed (and flushed) by the standard ...


17

From a purely semantic-syntactical point of view there's no effective difference between them. But if readability is your concern, why don't you use the "datenwolf" formatting style – I came to develop that style over the course of my past 5 projects or so: if( someFunction1(a) || someFunction2(b->b1,c) || *d == null || somefunction3(e) > f * g || ...


16

False: 0f * NAN == NAN 0f * INFINITY == NAN and ... 0f * -1f == -0f (negative 0f), with 0f == -0f :-) (on Intel, VC++, and probably on any platform that uses IEEE 754-1985 floating points) Example on ideone (that uses GCC on some Intel compatible platform probably)


15

(void (*)()) is a pointer to a function returning void and taking an unspecified, but fixed, number of arguments. (void (*)())0x1000 is casting the literal 0x1000 to the above type. Finally, the suffixed () calls that function. The expression preceding that needs to be in brackets otherwise the suffixed () will bind to the 0x1000 which is not syntactically ...


15

The reason is that unsigned long long will store exact integers whereas double stores a mantissa (with limited 52-bit precision) and an exponent. This allows double to store very large numbers (around 10308) but not exactly. You have about 15 (almost 16) valid decimal digits in a double, and the rest of the 308 possible decimals are zeroes (actually ...


15

The simplest way I can find to work around this issue is to simply switch the order of multiplication. If in testcplx.pyx I change varc128 = varc128 * varf64 to varc128 = varf64 * varc128 I change from the failing situation to described to one that works correctly. This scenario is useful as it allows a direct diff of the produced C code. tl;dr The ...


15

Yes When you do char *y = x; you make y point to the location where x points to. Since y points to a memory location returned by calloc, free(y); is perfectly valid. As @haccks commented, this would not work if you make y point to another memory location, provided that this memory location wasn't returned by malloc/calloc/realloc. In C, you should ...



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