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312

First of all, both loops are infinite, so measuring their "speed" is a bit nonsensical. However, we can see which one takes more instructions/resources per iteration. Using gcc, I compiled the two following programs to assembly at varying levels of optimization: int main(void) { while(1) { } return 0; } int main(void) { while(2) { ...


81

The existing answers showing the code generated by a particular compiler for a particular target with a particular set of options do not fully answer the question -- unless the question was asked in that specific context ("Which is faster using gcc 4.7.2 for x86_64 with default options?", for example). As far as the language definition is concerned, in the ...


67

The standard header stdint.h provides the types int_leastN_t and uint_leastN_t, where N is 8, 16, 32, and 64 (and possibly others, but these are not required). These are standard as of C99. It also provides "fast" alternatives, aka int_fastN_t and uint_fastN_t, with the same values of N. So, in your case, you can use int_least32_t or int_fast32_t.


48

Your explanation is correct. This seems to be a question that tests your self-confidence in addition to technical knowledge. By the way, if you answered Both pieces of code are equally fast, because both take infinite time to complete the interviewer would say But while (1) can do more iterations per second; can you explain why? (this is nonsense; ...


32

Yes, while(1) is much faster than while(2), for a human to read! If I see while(1) in an unfamiliar codebase, I immediately know what the author intended, and my eyeballs can continue to the next line. If I see while(2), I'll probably halt in my tracks and try to figure out why the author didn't write while(1). Did the author's finger slip on the keyboard? ...


23

The most likely explanation for the question is that the interviewer thinks that the processor checks the individual bits of the numbers, one by one, until it hits a non-zero value: 1 = 00000001 2 = 00000010 If the "is zero?" algorithm starts from the right side of the number and has to check each bit until it reaches a non-zero bit, the while(1) { } ...


15

You should have asked him how did he reached to that conclusion. Under any decent compiler out there, the two compile to the same asm instructions. So, he should have told you the compiler as well to start off. And even so, you would have to know the compiler and platform very well to even make a theoretical educated guess. And in the end, it doesn't really ...


14

This is because malloc works by chunks of 16 or 32 bytes because this strategy makes memory accesses more efficient. Therefore when you allocate 1 byte the next 15 bytes may probably be yours. However I would not recommend cheating knowing this trick but correctly allocate the right amount of bytes.


14

As others have noted, the standard include files define int_fast32_t, int_least32_t, uint_fast32_t, uint_least32_t which should likely behave as you want, but such types need to be used with extreme care. Because of integer promotion rules, there is no way for C code to avoid using types int and unsigned int. Further, integer literals may not always be of ...


13

Let's look at this from a simple perspective. At the very least, using extern "C" will remove the C++ name mangling. So, we then have your template, and we'll instantiate it twice. int foo(int val); float foo(float val); Under C's naming rules, these are required to have the same name foo from the perspective of the linker. If they have the same name ...


11

Well, yes, the second doesn't compile. You can't or a bool and a void. UPDATE: You say your C compiler compiles this and it works fine. I doubt it. That is, I'm sure your compiler compiles it, but what is the result of bool || void? Is void always true? Always false? Sometimes one and sometimes the other? In short - don't do it. Use the first form that ...


11

for(i=1;i<=10;;) is not a valid C syntax. for loop syntax in C is for ( expressionopt ; expressionopt ; expressionopt ) statement for ( declaration expressionopt ; expressionopt ) statement Note that, two semicolons must always be present, even when we've omitted some of the expressions.


10

When you wrote expression (int *)a then logically the original array can be considered as a one-dimensional array the following way int a[4] = { 1, 2, 3, 4 }; So expression a points to the first element equal to 1 of this imaginary array. Expression ( a + 1 ) points to the second element of the imaginary array equal to 2 and expression ( a + 1 )[0] ...


9

Are my assumptions correct or is there some other logic behind this? Yes. *(a+1)[0] is equivalent to a[1][0]. ((int *)a+1)[0] is equivalent to a[0][1]. Explanation: a decays to pointer to first element of 2D array, i.e to the first row. *a dereferences that row which is an array of 2 int. Therefore *a can be treated as an array name of first ...


9

Yes, it's possible (but non-portable) using register_printf_function, see 12.13 Customizing printf from libc documentation for more details: The GNU C Library lets you define your own custom conversion specifiers for printf template strings, to teach printf clever ways to print the important data structures of your program. Here is an example how ...


9

The first two calls that you show are undefined behavior according to the C standard; only the call that passes the last named parameter is correct. However, you get good behavior on gcc, because gcc compilers ignore the second parameter of va_start, using a different technique to find the end of the argument list: The traditional implementation takes ...


9

The bit hacks page suggests this expression: sign = (v != 0) | (v >> 31); It can be rewritten without != like this: sign = (!!v) | (v >> 31); (demo on ideone). I prefer this expression that does not use bit manipulation, though (from the same page). sign = (v > 0) - (v < 0);


9

Of course I do not know the real intentions of this manager, but I propose a completely different view: When hiring a new member into a team, it is useful to know how he reacts to conflict situations. They drove you into conflict. If this is true, they are clever and the question was good. For some industries, like banking, posting your problem to ...


8

Adjacent string literals are concatenated as part of translation phase 6. Brief summary of phases (source: C99 standard, paraphrased) Trigraphs and multi-byte characters in the source file are mapped to the source character set Lines ending in \ are spliced File parsed into a set of preprocessing tokens Preprocessing directives processed Character ...


8

It doesn't, it takes up 4 bytes regardless of which segment it's in. You can use the nm tool (from the GNU binutils package) with the -S argument to get the names and sizes of all of the symbols in the object file. You're likely seeing secondary affects of the compiler including or not including certain other symbols for whatever reasons. For example: $ ...


8

It is what is typically termed an opaque data type, meaning it's typically declared as a simple structure, and then internally in the OS libraries the FILE pointer is cast to the actual date-type of the data-structure that the OS will use access data from a file. A lot of these details are system-specific though, so depending on the OS, the definition may ...


7

The ' ' is example of integer character constant, which has type int (it's not converted, it has such type). Second is "" character literal, which contains only one character i.e. null character and since sizeof(char) is guaranteed to be 1, the size of whole array is 1 as well.


7

This is because your implementation uses recursion. For small numbers it works fine, but for large numbers it overflows the stack. This line if(nr)return modulo(nr * fact(nr - 1)); creates nr stack frames. Since the stack space is very limited, entering a large number causes stack overflows. Change your implementation to use iterative calculation of the ...


7

This question was tagged as C++ too, so here is a solution for template metaprogramming lovers like me. Requirements A typelist type, named list here. A Haskell-like filter metafunction. A head metafunction to get the first element of a typelist. The code This solution automates the accepted solution (Which is just "go to stdint.h and select the most ...


7

Is &“string” the same address as “string”? No, their type is different. "hello world" object has type char [12]. As for other arrays in an expression context, it is converted to char *. But: &"hello world" has type char (*)[12]. So in your example, it also means that: char *example[] = {&" ",&"\n", &"\t"}; is an ...


6

sizeof is an operator not a function. Operand of sizeof is not evaluated except when it is a variable length array. C11: 6.5.3.4 p(2): The sizeof operator yields the size (in bytes) of its operand, which may be an expression or the parenthesized name of a type. The size is determined from the type of the operand. The result is an integer. If the ...


6

I need to find an alternative to c_str() function in C... As stated in the comments above, C does not have a string type, but C does use arrays of char, and when NULL terminated are commonly referred to as C strings. There are many various methods to create strings in C. Here are three very common ways: Given the following: (for illustration in ...


6

You could wrap the accessor you need in a function, and pass that to the function that walks the array and aggregates the results. For example float getSensor1(const event_t* t) { return t->sensorOne; } float getSensor2(const event_t* t) { return t->sensorTwo; } void GraphSensor(float (*accessor)(const event_t*)) { // Get minimum value ...


6

Quote man 3 system: The value returned is -1 on error (e.g. fork(2) failed), and the return status of the command otherwise. This latter return status is in the format specified in wait(2). Thus, the exit code of the command will be WEXITSTATUS(status). man 2 wait shows the other information packed into the status returned by system(3). 512 means ...


6

You forgot to assign the result back to a. Just like int a = 3; a + 2; printf ("%d\n", a); will print 3 and not 5.



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