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0

You can declare a global variable in a header file, but not attribute it a value. Let only that in your .h file : extern char uid []; And in one specific .c file, initalize it : char uid []= "123456789561";


3

Static libraries (i.e. the object files within them) compiled for Linux cannot be used on OSX. The only thing you can do is: Get access to the source and create OSX versions of the libraries. Use a virtual machine to build the code.


0

The fputs syntax seem wrong. I think it is: int fputs(const char *str, FILE *stream) Pick @unwind's approach (as mentioned above) but if you still want to use fputs then your fputs line should be expanded into 3 lines: char temp[4]; // String to store 3-digit number + '\0' sprintf(temp, "%d, ", i); // Prepare a string for a given number ...


0

I see that you are using blocking sockets. In thread function server you are in while(1) doing recv on client sockets. If recv returns zero or client sends in "quit" message you close the socket ts_fd and inform other clients. You can use the SO_RCVTIMEO capability (setting socket option with setsockopt) to put timeout on recv calls. If no data is ...


2

The first case allows you to use the (typedefed) name of the struct for a member: typedef struct _node node; struct _node { int value; node *next; /* valid */ }; typedef struct { int value; node *next; /* not valid (unknown type name ‘node’) */ } node;


1

If the structure is accessible by different thread and re-used multiple times I would suggest to: allocate it once protect it with a mutex:surround manipulations of this struct with lock/unlock use memset to empty your structure, i.e. set all fields to 0 free it once you know it won't be used anymore From what I understood, You want to "empty" your ...


5

From a strict coding standpoint, it has no purpose. However, in header files it can serve as a type of interface definition, which list the "public" interface of GTK+. By the way, this style follows other GNU libraries. Anyway, I think we can safely say, that with modern C compilers and tools, it does not really make too much sense, but GTK+ is not really a ...


0

Loose the first scanf at line 9 and (for me) it then seem to work correctly: if ynYN is entered then the confirm function exits, otherwise it continues looping


0

You could try using the socket option SO_KEEPALIVE at your call to setsockopt() at the server side. Thus, the TCP stack terminates any connection over this socket if it is inactive for the specified timeout. It may/should then be the case that the blocking call to recv() in the server() function (i.e. your server's client thread) will then unblock with an ...


3

Apart from the fputs() usage, the problem is: for(i=0; i > 400; i++) If you initialize a variable with zero and perform a loop as long as it's greater than 400, that won't last too long.


7

No, there's no way that compiled without some serious-sounding warnings at least. You're using fputs() as if it were fprintf(), passing it an integer instead of a FILE pointer (which the compiler should not allow) and an extra argument (which the compiler should not allow). Also your for loop is broken. The middle part is an expression that should be true ...


0

You need to clean up the code from all bad programming practice: Avoid assignment inside conditions as it tends to create bugs and sometimes makes the code harder to read (assignment inside conditions is banned by MISRA-C). Do not use boolean operators to check pointers against NULL, or to check integers against 0. It will work but it doesn't make any ...


0

for loop ended with semicolon means it does not contain any body.It will not have any statement within for loop.It is used just for iteration.


0

use non-blocking connect and use select or poll or epoll for timeout. Here is the sample. int fd = socket(PF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0); int flags = fcntl(fd,F_GETFL); if (flags >= 0) flags = fcntl(fd, F_SETFL, flags | O_NONBLOCK); int n = connect(fd, (struct sockaddr*)&addr, sizeof addr); if(n < 0) { if(errno != EINPROGRESS && ...


1

You have some logic errors in your code, which is always scary when dealing with dynamic memory. The insert() function needs to do a copy of the part of the string that it wishes to store, since it only wants a prefix. Also, you really should check that sscanf() succeeds before relying on the variables having valid values. If it doesn't return 3, there was ...


0

You can use lk-sctp in combination with Netty framework over jdk-7 (and above) to implement M3UA (RFC 4666). Netty-4.0.25-FINAL is stable version for SCTP support. So the combination is: SCTP stack : lk-sctp-1.0.16 (over Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 6.5 (Santiago)) JDK-7 or above Netty-4.0.25-FINAL And your application on top of it. A sample ...


2

You have to specify that you are initializing a member other than the first: Test t2 = { 2, { .y = y } } ; Otherwise the compiler will try to initialize it as if you wrote: .x = y


3

Because the initializer's type isn't analyzed and matched against the possible members of the union. Instead, you're simply supposed to provide an initializer for the first union member. C11 draft §6.7.9.17: Each brace-enclosed initializer list has an associated current object. When no designations are present, subobjects of the current object are ...


3

You do not assign strings in C. You need to use strcpy() to copy the string lieral into the array. Also, if you check, the data type for hello_sensor_hostinfo.local_name[0] is INT8 whereas, "AAA" represents a char* (base address of a string literal). Hence the mismatch. FWIW, In your case, INT8 local_name[LOCAL_NAME_LEN_MAX]; is a compile time array. by ...


0

Did you put Free Pascal in strict Turbo Pascal Mode with -Mtp ? If I do it compiles, even with older 2.6.2. D:\testing>fpc vtprolog.pp -Mtp Free Pascal Compiler version 2.6.2 [2013/02/12] for i386 Copyright (c) 1993-2012 by Florian Klaempfl and others Target OS: Win32 for i386 Compiling vtprolog.pp vtprolog.pp(222,3) Note: Local variable "num" is ...


2

You don't show the declaration of pid. I guess it was wrongly defined as some unsigned integral type. You should declare: pid_t pid; before the line if ((pid = fork()) == 0) and this is documented in fork(2) which also reminds you that you need to have #include <unistd.h> near the start of your source file.


0

What about a typedef for your array type? Then getting a pointer will be easier.


0

#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <time.h> typedef struct { int n; int *vector; }Vector_T; int inicializar_original(Vector_T *v, int dim){ int i, j, s, r = rand()%10; scanf("%d", &s); for(i=0; i<dim; i++){ int *k = malloc( s * sizeof(int)); for(j=0; j<s; j++){ ...


0

To avoid spending more time in getting the P2C/PTC bootstrapping to run while you are probably only interested in the interpreter and not its *nix bootstrapping, I think it is easier to forget the PTC stuff and focus getting the pascal parts to compile/work with FPC 2.6.x. (the below took 10 minutes), generating a standalone Windows EXE with 10-20 code line ...


0

You should launch gdbserver on the remote target like this: On Target Machine, $ gdbserver ip_address_host:port programName On Host Machine, $ gdb programName (gdb) target remote ip_address_server:port


2

You appear to be talking about a commercial product, whose announcements give no useful information, e.g., this press release. Form feed is stated explicitly to be part of the character set in ISO/IEC 9899:199 (E) 5.2.1 Character sets. If the tool advised you not to use a documented, standard feature, that would be a defect in the tool itself. A ...


2

You allocate memory for float matrix, but then use it as double, since sizes of float and double are different you got errors. The correct way to go through matrix rows and colums is like this for(x=0; x<n; x++){ ... } but you wrote for(x=0;x<=n;x++){ .... } so you tried to access non-existing row with index n (but last row has index ...


0

Set the socket to non-blocking, issue the connect(), then use select() or poll() or epoll() with a timeout, selecting for writability. I don't know what you mean by 'measure the timeout'.


1

Seet seed or srand(time(NULL)); If u set with time, include <time.h> library. I recomended you include <stdlib.h> - this is for srand or rand function.


1

You can generate different random numbers by using #include <stdlib.h> // for rand() and srand() #include <time.h> // for time() // other headers int main() { srand(time(NULL)); // rest of your code } By using srand(), you can seed the Random Number generator to get different random numbers on different runs of the program. And ...


1

You have to set a seed so just do this before your while loop (Also don't forget to include: time.h): srand(time(NULL));


3

You need to initalise your rand() with srand() like so : #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> #include <time.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main() { srand(time(NULL)); int a = 1; while (a<=15) { printf("%d\n", rand()); a++; } return 0; } In short, you need to feed your random some ...


0

For the side question, you can use -std=gnu99 to get C99 with gnu extensions (like anonymous struct and union members within structs and unions).


1

In your code, you neither checked for the sucess of malloc() checked for the success of fopen(). For any of the cases, if malloc() fails, it will return NULL and using that pointer will cause undefined behaviour. if fopen() fails, it will return NULL, and using the file pointer later will again cause undefined behaviour. Put a chcek for sucess of ...


0

OK, so after going through several posts and thanks to the responses I got here, I changed the code and it seams to work properly. First of all the array should be declared as double: //dynamic allocate array of MUDG_table (1st Dimension) MUDG_table = calloc(arr_row,sizeof(double *)); //check if the memory has been allocated correctly if ...


-1

As per the C11 standard, chapter 6.5.3.2, unary & operator, The operand of the unary & operator shall be either a function designator, the result of a [] or unary * operator, or an lvalue that designates an object that is not a bit-field and is not declared with the register storage-class specifier. Clearly, a label does not qualify to be the ...


14

Label names do not interfere with other identifiers, because they are only used in gotos. A variable and a label can have the same name, and in standard C and C++ it's always clear from the context what is meant. So this is perfectly valid: name: int name; name = 4; // refers to the variable goto name; // refers to the label The distinction between ...


1

Register signal handler for SIGALARM. set alarm before calling connect and clear alarm after connect returns, if you hit signal handler then it's connection timeout.


-1

set the socket to non blocking, then keep reconnecting until connection is made, or the timeout is expired


0

The reason for the confusing is that the function actually does not swap pointers. Let's at first assume that the function has to swap pointers and its implementation has to be look as you think void swap(int *a, int *b) { int *temp; temp = a; a = b; b = temp } The function can be called the following way int x = 10; int y = 20; int *px = ...


1

When you input a number and press Enter key, an additional \n character passed to the standard input buffer. getchar reads that number leaving behind \n in the buffer. On next iteration of loop getchar reads \n before pressing any character by you and hence inside while for second time.Hence value is printed twice as \n is not there. Use below while ...


1

After entering any number you are pressing Enter key. and as '\n' != EOF so it is running two times. int main() { long nc; nc = 0; while (getchar()!= '\n'){ // check for enter key here. ++nc; printf("%ld\n", nc); } return 0; }


1

You can use sprintf and then trim the zeros. This is the same idea as @Havenard's answer, but writing spaces over the zeros instead of cutting the string. And my C-style is somewhat different FWIW. My style is that I don't want to count or do any arithmetic in my head; that's what the C optimizer is for :). #include <math.h> #include <stdio.h> ...


0

Program is 90% correct. Here are your problems: strtok() uses some static buffer. It will always return a pointer to the same region of memory. This is why you feel like your top node changes every time. Just duplicate the parsed strings as well. you forget to initialize the count of every node! You will run into trouble sooner or later unless you fix that ...


2

With a little help of modf, you can use %g to skip the trailing zeroes and \b to skip the leading zero: #include <stdio.h> #include <math.h> int main(void) { int i, iarr[] = {-4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4}; double darr[] = {0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1., 10., 100., 1000., 10000.}; double intpart, fractpart; for (i = 0; i < 9; ...


0

Coercing data into the correct pointer types can be done in various ways. The tricky part to this question is deciding how to manage the memory you are giving out a pointer to. If you are declaring values known statically at compile time, you could do it like so: // I _think_ you need to manually null-terminate the string here let ...


3

#include <stdio.h> char *get_number_formatted(double f) { static char buf[128]; // this function is not thread-safe int i, j; i = snprintf(buf, 128, "%20.10f", f) - 2; for (j = i - 8; i > j; --i) if (buf[i] != '0') break; buf[i + 1] = '\0'; return buf; } int main(void) { printf("%5d %s\n", -4, ...


1

In general what you are asking for is C++. the examples you posted are most likely going to be the more efficient or equally efficient using a C++ compiler. Often on embedded targets you have far outdated versions of gcc that generate bad code for c++ or don't support all the gory c++ details. You can try to run ${your_arch_prefix}-g++ --nostdlib ...


2

a = b means you are assigning address of b to a which not the right way. for swapping two numbers means you need to get value at that address and that value you have to swap. so right way is to do *a = *b; i.e value at the address of b assigned to value at the address of a.


0

On doing a = b, both a and b will point to location pointed by b, this will defeat the purpose of passing a and b as reference; as the swap() will not be reflected after the function returns.



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