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0

I don't have enough reputation to comment on Tom Bonner's answer, but using that information, I found the solution for my identical problem (with a different code base) was to find the .props file in the same directory as the .targets file, and with the same name (i.e. QtUIBuild.props and QtUIBuild.targets), and look for the offending path. In my case it was ...


0

For double a %lf should be used instead of %f because in scanf_s/scanf when you pass double with %f, it will be indicated for 4 byte entity, and double is of 8 bytes (in Visual Studio). Sizes may differ on compiler implementation, but mostly above mentioned reason stay relevant.


0

the following code compiles cleanly does proper error checking properly reads in the output file name does not cause undefined behaviour (leading to a seg fault event) I.E. it limits the number of characters read by fgets() - void output() { FILE *fileout; char line[40]; //file_in1 = fopen(filename1, "r"); // <-- always check results ...


0

http://www.mathopenref.com/coordgeneralellipse.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parametric_equation#Ellipse You can find the general mathematical background above. After that what you should do is: In each timestep, calculate x and y and set it. You can use parametric equation easily. Check out the second set of equations at the wikipedia link above.


0

In order to create a "negative" double from an unsigned int you must first negate as an integer and cast to double (either by bitwise negation or changing signs): #include <stdio.h> int main () { unsigned int x = 44231; /* unsigned number */ int i = ~x; /* bitwise not gives negative */ double d = ...


0

the following code will go the job char *make_dst( char *src, int beg, int end ) { int i = 0; char *dst = malloc( MAXLEN); if( NULL == dst ) { // then malloc failed perror( "malloc failed" ); exit( EXIT_FAILURE ); } // implied else, malloc successful memset( dst, 0x00, MAXLEN ); for( i=0, i<(end-beg+1); ...


4

There is no such thing as a "negative unsigned int". Unsigned int is always positive. Your -someint produces the value 0 if someint = 0, and UINT_MAX + 1 - someint otherwise according to the C rules. Use instead double x = - (double) someint;


-1

A favorite is access: /* test that file exists (1 success, 0 otherwise) */ int xfile_exists (char *f) { /* if access return is not -1 file exists */ if (access (f, F_OK ) != -1 ) return 1; return 0; } Note: access() is defined by POSIX, not C, so its availability will vary from compiler to compiler.


1

There is nothing in your question that specifies the digits being input are part of an actual int. Rather, its just a sequence of chars that happen to (hopefully) be somewhere in { 0..9 } and in so being, represent some non-bounded number. That said, you can send as many digit-chars as you like to the following, be it one or a million, makes no difference. ...


0

void countNum(int n, int *c){ if(n != 0){ int num = n % 10; countNum(n / 10, c); if(num < 5){ printf("%d", num); ++*c; } } } int main(){ int num, count = 0; scanf("%d", &num); countNum(num, &count); printf(" - %d\n", count); return 0; }


0

First of all, what you wrote is not a recursion. The idea is that the function will call itself with the less number of digits every time until it'll check them all. Here is a snippet which might help you to understand the idea: int countNum(int val) { if(!val) return 0; return countNum(val/10) + ((val % 10) < 5); }


0

I think this is what you want to do void checkcommand(char buffer[]) { printf("\n"); if(strcmp(buffer, "help") == 0) printf("Help called\n"); else { printf(buffer); } } int main(int argc, char **argv) { checkcommand(argv[1]); } try ./a.out help


2

Just use "%31[^:]:%31s". The %s conversion specification skips leading blanks anyway, and stops at the first blank after one or more non-blanks. If you decide you need blanks in the second field, but not the leading blanks, then use: "%31[^:]: %31[^\001]" (assuming it is unlikely that your string contains control-A characters that you're interested in). ...


0

Use the remainder operator %. "The result of the / operator is the quotient from the division of the first operand by the second; the result of the % operator is the remainder. In both operations, if the value of the second operand is zero, the behavior is undefined" C11dr §6.5.5 On each recursion, find the least significant digit and test it. then ...


1

The makefile needs to be updated to link object.o into the executable. Currently your link line is: cc $(CFLAGS) -o ex19 $(src) If you execute make (or make all) then the command will expand to: cc -Wall -g -o ex19 ex19.c which tries to generate the executable using only ex19.c. The build target ex19 is never invoked because all does not have it as a ...


0

You can lua_replace any lua value at the given index with whatever is at the top. Here's a simple unit test that takes your new empty table and moves it to position 2, replacing whatever happens to be there: int test_replace(lua_State *L) { lua_getglobal(L, "_VERSION"); lua_getglobal(L, "os"); lua_getglobal(L, "os"); printstack(L); ...


-2

if(str1==str2) is highly unsafe and its not a healthy practice ,try using strcmp(str1,str2) and if strcmp is true then it will return 0 else -1 So a better implementation is if(strcmp(str1,str2)==0){ //Do anything afterwards }


4

blk b; is the same as: abc b[1]; b is not a pointer in the sense that you are using it. b = shmat(shmid, NULL, 0); is incorrect because you can't assign a pointer to an array. That is wrong exactly the way the following is wrong. int arr[3]; arr = malloc(sizeof(int)*10);


0

After compiling your code, without any optimizations, I get the executable ex18 with a size of 10,136 bytes. file reports it as a "Mach-O 64-bit executable x86_64", since I am on a Mac. Some tool names and notations may be different on your system. Let's have a look at this file with some of the standard tools of Linux et fili. Using hexdump I get 363 ...


1

C is a compiled language, so the C source code gets translated to binary machine-language code. Because of that, you can't see the actual source code of any given library you have. If you want to know how it works, you can see if it's an open source library, find the source code of the particular revision that generated the version you're using, and read ...


2

this, buffer == "help" does not compare the strings. In C to compare two strings you need the strcmp function from the standard library, it is declared in the string.h header. Change this if(buffer == "help") to this if(strcmp(buffer, "help") == 0)


2

You may have buffer overflows in both of these sprintf commands: char cmd[128]={0}, file[20]; sprintf (cmd, "wget -q -O page%d.txt 'http://www.mtgsalvation.com/forums/creativity/artwork/340782-official-digital-rendering-thread?page=%d'", i, i); sprintf (file, "page%d.txt", i); Rather than try to analyze whether a particular instance overflowed or not, ...


2

try this #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> #include <math.h> int main(){ float mu=0, var=0, std; float x[20]={84, 63, 21, 78, 82, 19, 83, 47, 23, 78, 54, 60, 91, 23, 29, 48, 37, 26}; int i, n=20;// n=18 ? for(i=0;i<n;i++) mu+=x[i]; mu/=n; for(i=0;i<n;i++) ...


0

Solved. cuFFT in the inverse FFT do not divide the result by the dimension of the transform as usual, as the MATLAB. In this case by 1/NRSAMPLES.


0

Don't create a compatible bitmap. Create a DIB section: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dd183494%28v=vs.85%29.aspx BITMAPINFO bi; ZeroMemory(&bi,sizeof(BITMAPINFO)); bi.bmiHeader.biSize=sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER); bi.bmiHeader.biWidth=Width; bi.bmiHeader.biHeight=Height; bi.bmiHeader.biPlanes=1; bi.bmiHeader.biBitCount=32; char* ...


0

You can limit the input by using fgets instead. fgets(word, sizeof(word), stdin); if later need to extract things from the string use sscanf


1

Some versions of scanf support m modifier. For example in glibc>=2.7. They allocate necessary buffer for the user: char *p; int n = scanf("%ms", &p); if (n == 1) { printf("read: %s\n", p); free(p); } else { // error } There is also older a modifier which does the same.


3

First problem, you don't initialize the values of x or y and still you try to print them, while the other problem, being the more important, is: n = 512/sizeof(int) and then you malloc x = malloc(512/sizeof(int)) you should malloc this way x = malloc(n*sizeof(int)) which yields x = malloc(512) but since you want to allocate 128 of int, it is ...


0

Put a character constant in front of s in %s: scanf("%20s", &word); Your second question: in short No. You need memory space to take the input. A common solution however, to reduce allocations is do do something like: char tmp[1000]; char *strptr; scanf("%s", &temp); strptr = malloc(sizeof(char)*(strlen(tmp)+1)); but that will only save you ...


1

You can limit the string length by using fgets: fgets(word, sizeof(word), stdin); For second part: Unfortunately, In C you can't allocate the exact amount of memory needed for the string entered. The reason is that you need to know the length of string before allocating memory for it and for this you must have to store that string in a buffer. If ...


0

You've made a decent start, but you're making this a lot harder than it needs to be. One way to minimize errors is to rely on standard library functions when there are any that do the work you need done. For example: char tempString[1000]; char *search; search = strstr(sentence, word1); if (search) { ptrdiff_t head_length = search - sentence; int ...


0

What if you try to simplify your function to something like this? int replace(char *source, char *keyword, char* toreplace) { char * pch; pch = strstr (source,keyword); int sourceLen = strlen(source); int replaceStrLen = strlen(toreplace); // no substring found if(pch == NULL) return 0; // Get index to the found ...


3

while( beg <= end ) { dst[i] = src[beg]; i++; beg++; } This is correct because you're advancing both i and beg and assuring that beg <= end. while( beg <= end ) { dst[i] = src[i + beg]; i++; } In this case, you have an infinite loop, because if beg <= end was true initially, it will always be true after N iterations since ...


0

Among other things you have declared tempString as char* tempString[1000] which is an array of uninitialized character pointers so when you do strcpy(tempString, sentence); you are basically getting undefined behavior. Use also fgets instead of gets when you input strings - even though you have rather large buffers it can happen one day that you pipe in ...


0

We can also pass the flag to recv to wait until all the message has arrived. It works when you know the no of bytes to receive. You can pass the command like this. numbytes = recv(sockfd, buf, MAXDATASIZE-1, MSG_WAITALL);


1

When you pass a variable to a function, you only pass the value of this variable. You never pass the address, because a new variable is created in that function. The parameters that you see in the signature of the function are all local variables, just like you would write them in the function body. These parameters are filled with the value that you pass ...


1

We can also pass the flag to recv to wait until all the message has arrived. It works when you know the number of bytes to receive. You can pass the command like this. numbytes = recv(sockfd, buf, MAXDATASIZE-1, MSG_WAITALL);


2

You declare char line[40]; but later do // v--- 90? while (fgets(line, 90, file_in1) != NULL) line cannot hold 90 characters. Either make line larger or read fewer characters.


2

In general, a file may have multiple names (hard links), no names at all (unlinked files), and a file descriptor might be connected to something that's not represented in the filesystem (for example a pipe or a socket). Under Linux, you can do snprintf(buf, bufsize, "/proc/self/fd/%d", fd); rc = readlink(buf, filename, filename_size); If readlink is ...


0

The reason why num and num_p have the same address in both functions is because of how the stack works: The first call to debug allocates a variable on the stack. Then, when the function returns, the stack is freed again. Now you call debug_p, and therefore another variable is allocated. It will use the same place in memory as before, because the stack is ...


0

If you're inserting into a BLOB column, then instead of escaping the data via mysql_real_escape_string(), you should probably express it as a HEX string. You will have to figure out how to encode your int16_t data into the needed byte sequence, as at minimum you have a byte-order question to sort out (but if you're in control of both encoding and decoding ...


0

I'll throw my two cents in here. First, the solution proposed in the other answers saying to use an external typedef is not just a workaround, that is the way the Cython docs say things like this should be done. See the relevant section. Quote: "If the header file uses typedef names such as word to refer to platform-dependent flavours of numeric types, you ...


1

For the new question, we need to pass in sort() a kind of iterator that will not only let us compare the right things (i.e. will make sure to take 4 steps through our double[] each time instead of 1) but also swap the right things (i.e. swap 4 doubles instead of one). We can accomplish both by simply reinterpreting our double array as if it were an array of ...


1

Use strlen() instead of strcmp() to see which word is longer. strcmp() will compare if both strings are the same, strlen() will get the length.


4

This loop has at least four problems: while((ch = getchar()) != '\n') { word[i++] = ch; } First of all it can overwrite memory beyond the array and secondly you have to append the string with the terminating zero. Also you are saving results into a char but getchar() returns an int, and you are not testing for EOF but you should (and it is ...


2

One of your problems is, that the empty string compares smaller than all other strings, so your code to find the smallest string correctly returns the empty string with which it was initialized. Since there is no special string that compares greater than all other strings, you need to use the first string you get as the initialization: for(int i = 0; ; ...


1

The errors you are seeing mean that you have a mixture of i386 and x86_64 code in the build, and you need to be consistent. Unless there's a compelling reason to do otherwise (I'd be curious to know what it is), you should be compiling everything for 64-bit only. Using gcc on Mac, that is normally the default, but you can force it by adding a -m64 flag to ...


0

If you need total number of distinct substring of a string you can use suffix array and lcp Here is a demonstration : Let, the string is = "aabaa" let sa[] is the sorted index after sorting the suffixes using suffix array and lcp[] is the longest common prefix between two suffixes after applying suffix array algorithm the suffixes will sort like this : ...


4

To say that a static function can only be called in the file it has been defined is actually a shortcut to the fact that a static function only has visibility in the translation unit it has been defined. In C terminology we say that the identifier for the function has internal linkage. If you include a file into another file and compile the source file you ...


0

You need to concatenate the two "strings" before passing them down into the library. Either using the pre-processor: #define str "Mercedes" ... if (mysql_query(con, "INSERT INTO Cars VALUES(2,"str",57127)")) { finish_with_error(con); } Or do it during runtime: char str[] = "Mercedes"; char query_template[] = "INSERT INTO Cars VALUES(2,%s,57127)" ...



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