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0

The sieve looks OK... and memory is free, so one byte per entry and including all the even numbers is not a big deal. When you are scanning for primes in the printing loop you could avoid the % operation by counting up to 100 and then resetting c... but I would hope that does not save a great deal. So, the sieve stops at i == 10001, after sieving all odd ...


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There have been bank conflicts since the earliest vector processing CPUs from the 1960's It's caused by interleaved memory or multi-channel memory access. Interleaved memory access or MCMA solves the problem to slow RAM access, by phasing access to each word of memory from different banks or via different channels. But there is a side effect is access ...


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A couple of notes: A -NORMAL- keyboard func will get unsigned char, int, int as parameters and not int, int, int, you're just consuming more place in memory. You should be using glutSpecialFunc as glutKeyboardFunc is for normal keys such as 'W', 'A' and so and glutSpecialFunc is the one for arrow keys and escape and so and is getting a function pointer to ...


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TL;DR: Generally the answer is no. But there are some system-specific ways to handle such exceptional situations. Let me first explain the "no" part. C++ does not throw exceptions in case of dereferencing null pointer, or other segmentation fault errors. Those errors are treated in the same way as e.g. out-of-bounds array access - nothing is checked and ...


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This is an undefined behavior printf uses a pointer to scan down the format specifier for copying characters to the output stream. When it encounters a format specifier(ie;%...) then it executes additional code to extract a value from the stack format it in the correct manor according to the format code and send it to the output stream. But it depends on ...


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For C++ the only good solution is to fix the code, if you can't, the signal handling explained in other answers is risky but maybe it works. My preferred solution if I had to manage a program that segfaults would be to create a separated process for the buggy code. That way the process can crash freely and be relaunched or cleaned from a safe process.


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To remove, and or rename elements within a namespace: The WSDL you are using to create your source files determines the elements that will be contained in resulting source code. If you want individual elements (optional or otherwise) to be eliminated, or re-named, you must edit the WSDL. (or make a request to whomever owns it to edit it). The .xsd files ...


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The reason that the long long computation fails is that the RHS of the assignments is calculated as int and you are trying to shift by values that are too large for int. You need to coerce the RHS into the specified type: void create_minmax_unsigned() { unknownun exponent = (sizeof(unknownun) * 8) - 1; unknownun max = ((unknownun)1 << ...


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Yes, you can do that. In my experience I sometimes find that the failed operation causes future operations to be rather useless (since they are operating on data that should have been updated by the failed operation, but wasn't), or that many operations fail for the same reason. But sometimes it does allow mostly-correct execution of the program. You many ...


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I'm not sure if this can be done with exception catching mechanisms in C++, but this can be achieved on POSIX-compliant systems with sigaction, which allows you to call a function when a certain signal is received Example of signal handling


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I realize that the state of a computation is effectively corrupted after a segmentation fault A segmentation fault says you have a bug which it is likely your application cannot recover from. But I would argue this does not corrupt the memory as this cannot alter the memory. It may be an indication your memory was corrupted earlier. Can the same ...


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As suggested in the comments, the while(1) statement is where your code is getting hung. Note however, that your code is executing - you're just in an infinite loop. That's also why you can't view your variables or current program counter. Generally when you're attached to a ucontroller via PC host, you can't view state information while the ucontroller is ...


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Consider what happens when you take an argument of type int& (reference to int) : void f(int &x) { x++; } void g(int x) { x++; } int main() { int i = 5; f(i); assert(i == 6); g(i); assert(i == 6); } The same behaviour can be achieved by taking a pointer-to-int (int *x), and modifying it through (*x)++. The only ...


1

int f(char* p) is the usual way in C to pass the pointer p to the function f when p already points to the memory location that you need (usually because there is a character array already allocated there as in your Method 2 or Method 3). int f(char** p) is the usual way in C to pass the pointer p to the function f when you want f to be able to modify the ...


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On Fedora, the static version of glibc is in the glibc-static package. sudo yum -y install glibc-devel glibc-static


1

Intel documentation says "Reads are not reordered with other reads" (section 8.2.2) GCC generates the mfence instruction on atomic_store only. As far as I can wrap my head around it this should be enough to make sure that the write order seen by other CPUs is the same as on the CPU doing the store.


3

Yes, the specifier and the data have to match under penalty of Undefined Behaviour. Quote from C99 Standard: If any argument is not the correct type for the corresponding conversion specification, the behavior is undefined. http://port70.net/~nsz/c/c99/n1256.html#7.19.6.1p9


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You will invoke undefined behavior. http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/docs/rr/dr_083.html (c11, 7.1.4p1) "If an argument to a function has [...] or a type (after promotion) not expected by a function with variable number of arguments, the behavior is undefined."


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In the unsigned case, this is amusing: result = a + b ; if (result < a) result = -1 ;


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first one is accessing ethernet header ptr, and next is accessing the iphdr ptr. ( ethernet packet contains IP packet)


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tokenizer allocates and returns a pointer to a StringArray, but you never free it. You should free each one in create_commands_tree. tokenizerthrows away the first result from strtok which probably isn't what you want. You're allocating sr->strings[0] but never copying anything into it. create_command and insert_into_commands_tree should be passed a ...


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You can't just shift 1 << (sizeof(signed type)*CHAR_BIT-1), because that's undefined behaviour (if sizeof(signed type) <= sizeof(int)). Also, what is (x+1)-1? (Hint: x, unless x was INT_MAX, in which case it's undefined). So that doesn't get you a negative number, does it?


3

This is because the exact order when function arguments are evaluated in C is not defined. Therefore you cannot be sure about the value of your insertID++'s. To fix this you should properly calculate the values to pass in different variables before calling asprintf()


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This is all susceptible to optimization, but you could also try to introduce a new scope: extern int bar(int *p); int foo() { int z = foo(); { int n[100]; return z+bar(n); } } The introduction of the new scope means that n should not live before foo() is called. Again, optimization could break all of this, like your own solution or the ...


2

In the first line (struct ether_header *) sendbuf; the variable sendbuf is cast to a pointer to the struct ether_header, you can read more about casting here The second line (struct iphdr *) (sendbuf + sizeof(struct ether_header)); it's adding sizeof(struct ether_header) to the pointer sendbuf, by doing that, it reaches the memory zone after the one ...


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The cast is required, see C11 (n1570) 6.5.2.2 p.2: […] Each argument shall have a type such that its value may be assigned to an object with the unqualified version of the type of its corresponding parameter. This refers to the rules for assignment, the relevant part is (ibid. 6.5.16.1 p.1) One of the following shall hold: […] the left ...


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int main(void) { int ar[2][2] = {1,2,3,4}; int **p= NULL , i=0, j=0; int *np = &ar[0][0]; p = &np; puts("OUT: "); for(i = 0; i < 2; i++) { for(j = 0 ; j < 2; j++) { printf("%2d", *(*(ar + i) + j)); //printf("2d", *(*(p + i) + j)); /* This is wrong . ...


1

There are a couple errors in your code: Function void read(char* zin,int NUMBER_LETTERS,int NUMBER_WORDS) If you concatenate words separated by '\0' you will end having just one string, because every string function will stop at the first '\0' and will not process further characters. So you cannot use strcat(zin,'\0'); If you want to mark the ...


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No. A data race happens when multiple threads access a memory location (through a non-atomic value) and at least one of the accesses is a write and the operations are not ordered. Since thread creation is a synchronization point, all the accesses after thread creation are ordered after the initial write access, and the later accesses are only reads. So ...


1

For reading the variable: no For writing to and reading the variable: yes


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In the first case you have an array of int[2], while in the second case you have an array of int*. If you use sizeof(ar[0]), it would print 2*sizeof(int), while the second would print sizeof(int*). printf("sizeof(ar) = %lu\n", sizeof(ar)); printf("sizeof(ar[0]) = %lu\n", sizeof(ar[0])); printf("sizeof(ar[0][0]) = %lu\n", sizeof(ar[0][0])); ...


1

int * and unsigned char * are not considered compatible types, so implicit conversion will issue a diagnostic. However, the standard does allow explicit casting between different pointers, subject to two rules (C11 section 6.3.2.3): Converting a type "pointer to A" to type "pointer to B" and back to "pointer to A" shall result in the same original pointer. ...


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Although some would say "it is undefined behavior according to the standard", here is what happens de-facto (answering by an example): Safe: void f(char* p) { char r, w = 0; r = p[0]; // read access p[0] = w; // write access } ... int x = 0; f((char*)&x); // the casting is just in order to emit the compilation warning This code is ...


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C11, §6.5.2.2: 2 Each argument shall have a type such that its value may be assigned to an object with the unqualified version of the type of its corresponding parameter. §6.5.16.1 describes assignment in terms of a list of constraints, including the left operand has atomic, qualified, or unqualified pointer type, and (considering the type the left ...


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You cannot have a variable length array as a member of a structure type. What you can do is use a flexible array member as the last member of a structure type. See c99, 6.7.2.1 for more information on flexible array member feature. In your case, I think the best way is to use pointer members in your structure type and allocate the array objects through ...


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Question 1 Why doesn't the setitimer with ITIME_PROF work when it's set in the parent process ? The CPU / System calls for the child are not collected by it ? No, they are not. The timer related to ITIME_PROF only decrements when the process which has the timer set is executing, or when system calls are executing on it's behalf, not when child ...


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OP tagged C++ so here goes.. std::stringstream ss; ss << f1; std::string s = ss.str(); ptr = s.c_str();


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Use snprintf function to convert a float value to a string. Use sprintf function to convert a float value to a string. Also use a field width to ensure you are not overflowing the destination array.


0

With threads it's always worth wondering what happens if a given thread stops running for a "long time" in between two statements (or sequence points, if we want to get technical about it). In this case: if the main thread stops after creating the thread1, then thread1 can arrive at pthread_mutex_lock() before the mutex has been initialised. if the main ...


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As far as the language is concerned, there's no error - a statement is not required to have a side effect. However, since a statement that does nothing is almost certainly a mistake, most compilers will warn about it. Yours will, but only if you enable that warning via the command line arguments. You can enable just that warning with -Wunused-value, but I ...


0

I can see at case for recovering from a SIG_SEGV, if your handling events in a loop and one of these events causes a Segmentation Violation then you would only want to skip over this event, continue processing the remaining events. In my eyes SIG_SEGV is similar to the NullPointerException in Java. Yes the state will be inconsistent and unknown after either ...


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In my case, the installer mingw-get-setup.exe failed to download some files, so the gcc complication tool chain is broken, when rerun mingw-get-setup.exe and get the lost files, it is OK.


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bret - 2; is an expression statement and it is has no side-effect. C does not requires any warning for this statement. The compiler is free to add or not an informative warning to say the statement has no effect. The compiler can optimize out the statement.


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first problem solotion : because in your for loop you go through MAX change it to : for(i=0; i < row; i++){ for(j=0; j < col; j++){ myArray[i][j] = letter[rand()%3]; } } second problem solution : first problem with check function is that you should pass my Array by reference not by value change it by adding'&' sign ...


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For 1st problem change your for loops for(i=0; i < MAX; i++){ for(j=0; j < MAX; j++){ ... } } to use row and col variables for(i=0; i < row; i++){ for(j=0; j < col; j++){ ... } }


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As per my understanding "is.loaded" checks for the loaded symbols. As per your header, you can try: is.loaded("DoubleMetaphone") To call the method. try: .C("DoubleMetaphone", <your>, <arguments>)


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You can indeed treat every object as an array of characters. However, you have to cast the pointer explicitly: float f = 1.5f; char const * p = (char const *)&f; for (size_t i = 0; i != sizeof(float); ++i) { printf("The byte at position %zu has value %d.\n", i, (int)p[i]); }


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Syntactically it is correct. It depends on the compiler , some compilers throw an error while some don't. Your code throws an error when compiled using visual studio but it just gives you warning when compiled using gcc compiler and you also get a junk character as output with gcc. Even though syntactically it is correct you shouldn't assign a pointer in ...


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One simple way is to use sizeof to get the size in bytes, multiply by 8 to get the number of bits, and then work from that. Though that doesn't make a difference between signed and unsigned. However I suggest you instead search through the header files used by your program to find out what the type really is.


3

If it's an unsigned arithmetic type, you can do (ctype)-1, which is guaranteed to evaluate to the maximum value ctype can hold (and the minimum value then of course is 0). Otherwise, if no assumption about the type or the implementation can be made, you can't know for sure.



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