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0

How about do { // Start the loop switch (scale) { ... } /* end switch */ printf("Enter in C to Continue, or S to stop: "); scanf(" %c", &response); // Read the response } while(response == 'y' || response == 'Y'); // Check the response and loop if the response the positive


0

Check your return values functions that can return errors. And don't use magic numbers instead of correct flags. Your waitpid calls don't actually wait for any process to finish and just return errors. What does your magic number "7" mean? That's not what the documentation tells you to do. One of the bits in the number 7 is WNOHANG, which tells waitpid to ...


0

The most common way is to use a do-while loop. Make following changes initialize response to C. put the switch case and next printf() and scanf() in do..while() loop. in the while () condition, check while (c ==C).


0

As arrays decay into pointers, when an array is passed to function as a parameter we can illustrate it as declaring parameter as an array as shown below, void function (char a[]) { ... } Now the above declaration is interpreted by compiler differently as a pointer declaration since the function actually receives the pointer to an arrya of type T, as shown ...


1

In most cases such kind of operations requires root access. Run your application with root rights and you'll get it work.


0

In response to your update (being concerned about sizeof(foo+1) type situations: Yes, sizeof applied to array_name + int is equivalent to sizeof &(array_name[int]);, on the basis that an array, decays into a pointer in those cases. Likewise, to get to the actual value out of the array you don't write arr_name + 1, but rather *(arr_name + 1). So, taking ...


1

The problem was that the structure was in main, I did some fixes also to the code and comment them. #include <stdio.h> //By defining the struct at the beginning you can avoid the forward declaration //and it make more sense to know what "numbers" is before continuing reading the code. struct numbers { int a; int b; int c; }; void ...


1

sample to fix #include <stdio.h> int main(void){ int sequence[] = { 'a','b','c','d','g','j','o','p','q','q', 'j','k','j','f','a','q' }; int wrap_size = 10; int i, count=0; for(i=0; i< sizeof(sequence)/sizeof(*sequence); ++i){ if(count++) printf(", "); printf("%c", sequence[i]); ...


4

Function swap can't see the definition of struct numbers. Put it globally outside main. Extra Tip - Use typedef with structs, it gives you flexibility in declaration: typedef struct typeNumbers { int a; int b; int c; } numbers; Note that typeNumbers is optional. Declare it like: numbers x = {1, 2, 3};


2

Some compilers will compile your code through compiler extension, but it is not portable. You can work around this issue by conditionally defining another macro, and using its result in a call of TRACE, like this: #ifdef MYDEF #define IF_MY(x,y) x y #else #define IF_MY(x,y) x #endif Now you can write your TRACE as follows: TRACE((IF_MY("Message: %s", ...


7

You're expecting the code in swap() to be able to access the fields of struct numbers, but the full declaration of that type is inside main(), so it's not visible. Break out the declaration, it must be visible to all who need it. Putting it first will also remove the need to pre-declare the structure. The same with swap() itself, putting it before main() ...


6

The problem is that the struct numbers declaration is global, but the definition is local in main, To use the members of a structure, the swap function must know what members the structure have, and as it can't see the definition it doesn't know that. Remove the declaration and put the definition in the global scope.


1

The footnote applies to a (function) parameter. e.g. void foo(int param_arr[32]) { int local_arr[32]; } param_arr is a parameter to the function - and while it looks like an array, it's really a pointer (an int *). So sizeof param_arr yields the size of an int *. local_arr is not a parameter. So sizeof yields the size of that array.


2

The key point from the quote are "parameter declared to have array type" and "the adjusted (pointer) type". What this is referring to is the fact that a function parameter of "array type" is adjusted to pointer type. Once that adjustment is made, the type is pointer, and its size has to be the size of a pointer. It cannot be anything else. This is how it ...


0

Just to clarify your doubt below code might help: void func(int a[]) { sizeof(a) is not equal to sizeof(int) * 10 but equal to sizeof(pointer) Because int a[] is adjusted to int * } int main() { int a[10]; int *p = a; //Initialize //sizeof(a) = sizeof(int) * 10 //sizeof(p) = sizeof(pointer) func(a); }


0

Having an object of array type that does not produce the size of a pointer is simple: don't do it on a a function argument: const int foo[32]; printf("hey, foo is %zu bytes\n", sizeof foo); Will not print sizeof (int *). This is the normal usage, the text you're quoting is pointing out that when an array is passed to a function, it decays to a pointer, ...


-1

I think, what you need is char *task; and then allocate memory as mon[j].task=malloc(strlen(temptask)+1); [Assuming temptask is a valid null-terminated string] Next, as you've allocated memory to mon as mon = malloc(12 * sizeof(month)); the access should be made as mon[j].task // j being the index, running from 0 to 11 Otherwise, if you ...


0

char *task[40]; is an array of 40 pointers. You probably want a single array of 40 characters, in which case no need to malloc it separately, or else a single pointer in which case you can malloc(40). You can't call strlen() on an uninitialized C string, that's undefined behavior (buffer overrun).


1

for(i=0;i<40;i++) { /* Allocating memory to each pointers and later you write to this location */ mon->task[i] = malloc(size);/* If you have a initialized string then size = strlen(tempTask) + 1 */ } What you have is array of pointers and just access them and allocate memory to each of the pointers individually as shown above.


0

Simply iterate along the string, testing every character: int all_digits(char *string){ if( *string == 0) // empty string - wrong return 1; for( ; *string != 0; string++) // scan the string till its end (a zero byte (char)0) if (!isdigit(*string)) // test for a digit return 1; // not a ...


0

If you are under Unix environment you can include in test file additional header yourheader_static.h with declarations of your static functions and translate obj file code_under_test.o through objdump --globalize-symbols=syms_name_file to globalize local symbols. They will be visible as if they are non-static functions.


0

Your code is very confusing, however, the answers are. readLine() is actually reading the input from the client using read() and storing that to str, yeah, byte by byte. What else you want to do as read from client input? Not clear. you cannot compare string using ==. Use strcmp()/ strncmp(). Note: Please add the return type of the functions. Don't ...


0

In this case you cannot get the correct length using the sizeof function. sizeof function will give you the size of the given data type. You can use the strlen function. While using the strlen you have to manage the following, Consider in your string in last there is no null value you didn't get the correct value of the string length. For this you have to ...


2

int n = strlen(string); for(i=0; i < n; i++) sizeof(pointer) is not same as sizeof(array) You need to pass a valid string which is a null terminated string else strlen() might crash. Edits: Alternatively you can have for(i=0; string[i] != '\0'; i++)


0

In your code, string is of type char *. sizeof(string) will give you the size of a char *, not the array. You need to pass the size of the array explicitly, using another paramter to all_digits() function and use that value in for loop condition checking. Maybe something like this int all_digits(char *string, int size){ short i; for(i=0; i < ...


0

Problems might occur when using MyClass objects . It depends on how you use them. Take the following scenario (bogus code here). MyClass* ptr = SharedLibHandle->CreateMyClass(); ptr->doStuffNonVirtual(); //1 this might work fine ptr->doStuffVirtual(); //2 this will work fine ptr->myThing= 5; // 3 this might work fine MyClass* localAllocPtr = ...


5

Your understanding is correct! But you're running into a quirk of the C language. A label, including a case label, must be followed by an expression, not a variable declaration. You can work around this by inserting a null statement (e.g, 0;) after the case, or by enclosing the case body in a set of braces. A practical way of doing this might be by ...


2

The __packed qualifier is a compiler-specific feature of the armcc C compiler, published by ARM. A full explanation is present in their documentation, but in brief, it indicates that no padding for alignment should be inserted into the qualified object, and that pointers with this qualifier should be accessed as if they might be misaligned. (This may cause ...


0

You can use unsigned char buffer[N]; for copying from and to file. You can use ftell for finding file size. May be below link will help you. http://www.studytonight.com/c/file-input-output.php


0

Finally I found my answer in this huge user guide https://engineering.purdue.edu/~dionysis/EE452/Lab2/Lab2_Supporting_Materials/Embedded%20Coder_Users%20Guide.pdf I had to use mpt.Parameter Imported from file and check Inline parameter option.


1

You just opened write file in "rb" mode. finalFile = fopen("new.wav", "rb"); Please try finalFile = fopen("new.wav", "wb"); and check finalFile==NULL


0

If I understand well, your program takes 3 arguments : start value, increment and end value. So: if( argc >= 4 ) { int start_value = atoi( argv[1] ); int incr_value = atoi( argv[2] ); int end_value = atoi( argv[3] ); // .. do what you want ... }


0

You need to parse 3 arguments, not just one. int main(int argc, char *argv[] ) { int start = atoi(argv[1]); // 35005 int interval = atoi(argv[2]); // 50 int end = atoi(argv[3]); // 36005 Ofcourse, you should also check that argc to make sure you have enough arguments


0

The tools I know to make such things are : extundelete foremost


1

There is no need to assign the address of the pointer like this. (*pNode).next = &(pQ->fGuard.next); you can assign that directly. (*pNode).next = pQ->fGuard.next; If you are assigning like your code, you have to use the double pointer for storing that.


0

pQ->fGuard.next Here you are referring a pointer and in order to store the address of the pointer you should have a double pointer but what you have is a single pointer pNode->next = &(pQ->fGuard.next); /* This is not right */ Hence the warning pNode->next = (pQ->fGuard.next); /* This is right */


0

Before using feof() on fp. Ensure that fopen() succeeded. #include <string.h> /* For strerror() */ #include <errno.h> /* For errno */ #include <stdlib.h> /* For exit() */ fp = fopen ("FaultyFile.txt", "r"); /* Add Error-checking */ if (NULL == fp) { printf ("Error No : [%d]\n", errno); ...


1

Fread does not fail while reading the empty file. You didn't check the stream open that is opened correctly. fp = fopen("/home/amadhab/aa", "r+"); In this case, if the open of that file is failed. Now the fp have the value as NULL. i = fread(buffer, 1, 1, fp); Now you are accessing the NULL File Stream. This is the reason for segmentation fault. To ...


0

Try to check if the file is opened correctly or not check if( fp==NULL) using an if condition if fp==NULL is true, file is not being opened correctly


0

Normally there's no need to wait. If your writing and reading function is threaded somehow in the background (why would you do that???) then synchronizating them is mandatory. I2C is a very simple linear communication and all the devices used my me was able to produce the output data within microsecs. Are you using 100kHz, 400kHz or 1MHz I2C?


1

In your code fp = fopen("/home/amadhab/aa", "r+"); there is no success check for fopen() return value. if fopen() fails, it will return NULL (which get collected in fp) and the subsequent usage of the variable fp which was used to collect the return value will lead to undefined behaviour Note. That is what is happening in fread(buffer, 1, 1, fp); // ...


5

What should happen, if the program works, is this: 1 2 3 i = 0 When fread() fails, it should return 0 (or a number smaller than the requested number of items). However, this does not happen. This is probably because fp is null. You are not allowed to pass a null parameter to fread(). Probably, fp is null because /home/amadhab/aa does not exist. Try ...


1

No fread does not fail for empty files. Source. As already pointed out by others the error has nothing to do with the function itself.


0

Check the return value of fp1 = fopen("try1.txt","r"); first. It is fare to check the return values of all standard functions( with proper return values) before proceeding to next step. In this case "fp1" should not be NULL. Please check the file location or check whether file is present in current directory.


0

You forgot to test the failure of fopen like: finalFile = fopen("new.wav", "wb"); if (!finalFile) { perror("new.wav"); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); } And if you write a file, open it in write mode. You should of course compile with all warnings & debug info: gcc -Wall -Wextra -g yoursource.c -o yourbinary and use the debugger (gdb)


1

Change if (feof(fp1)) to if (fp1 && !feof(fp1)) That is check for the return value of fopen(). If unable to open the file it would return NULL. Edit: Check if the file is in the same directory as that of exe/binary. Check whether you have the permission to access the file.


3

The Debug assertion failure might be caused by fp1 being null. This will happen if the file could not have been opened.


1

You have to export tool chain path and after that you need to export following environment variables export CROSS_COMPILE=arm-none-linux-gnueabi- export CC=${CROSS_COMPILE}-gcc after this run make command to compile files or you can define this environment variables is makefile also.


0

You can use the PROC_THREAD_ATTRIBUTE_HANDLE_LIST extended attribute to explicitly specify exactly which handles a particular process inherits. Raymond Chen's blog post "Programmatically controlling which handles are inherited by new processes in Win32" includes sample code for doing this. The short version: InitializeProcThreadAttributeList() to create ...


0

Just declare a char variable and assign the value. To assign hex prefix with 0x, for octal use 0 and for decimal just write the number with no prefix. The decimal ascii value of 'z' is 122. #include <stdio.h> int main() { char a = 122; char b = 0x7a; char c = 0172; char d = 'z'; putchar(a); putchar(b); putchar(c); putchar(d); } ...



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