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Wrong use of "%s". There is not a way to use printf("%s" to print an array with data after the first null character or '\0'. char x[] = {'h','e','\0','l','l','o','\0'} printf("%s\n",x); // This only prints "he" printf("%s",... is for printing strings. x is a string only up to and including the first '\0'. To "copy all the characters in a char[] to ...


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You can do that, it runs. But the point is, what is your aim? What value are you expecting and what are you getting? Moreover, 'h' is 104 according to ASCII.


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You really need to find out why your interrupts are disabled. It could be that something is disabling them for you. You might find something useful by simply running trap at the shell prompt (which should list any traps set). However, it was not conclusive for me running Bash on Mac OS X; even when I disabled interrupt and quit and then ran a login shell, ...


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To debug your issue you should try to confirm that the image path is correct. As suggested in the comments, try specifying the full absolute path of the file. Remember to to use escape slashes if you are on windows (e.g. c:\a.bmp will need to be "c:\a.bmp") OR If you are executing your application from Visual Studio then you can configure the working ...


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The OpenCV documentation has mentioned imread() would return an empty matrix ( Mat::data==NULL ) if the image file cannot be read. http://docs.opencv.org/modules/highgui/doc/reading_and_writing_images_and_video.html#imread You should check if the "a.bmp" file is in your current working directory. The IDE (visual studio) may set executable's working ...


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The excessive use (IMNSHO) of parentheses is forcing the division to be integer. If you had written x = PI * sradius / INCHES_PER_FEET * sradius / INCHES_PER_FEET * DOUGH_PER_SQFT; instead of x = (PI*((sradius/INCHES_PER_FEET)*(sradius/INCHES_PER_FEET))*DOUGH_PER_SQFT); the divisions would have been done in floating point and you would get a more ...


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There is a call to malloc and realloc, but never a call to delete. Is the delete taken care of by curl then? Or is this going to create memory leaks?


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There are three basic situations where the void type is used. There might be some other marginal situations, but these three are where you'll see void used, maybe 99% of the time. It helps to understand this by keeping in mind that "void" means "there is no type here", as in "datatype". 1) Declare a function that returns no value, as opposed to a function ...


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the JNICALL function name in the .c file should be exact as that in the HelloWorld.h file see this link for more info


4

is there any value or purpose to using it in such a way void k = 0; No, that statement doesn't make any sense, and the compiler will complain about an incomplete type. Notice that whenever you see void used in a type declaration, it's followed by a * that indicates a pointer, like: void *foo = nil; In that case, you're telling the compiler that ...


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Use type-casting. For example, main() { float a; int b=2, c= 3; a=(float)b/(float)c; // This is type-casting printf("%f",a); }


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This works for me fine, so far. Perhaps you should attempt this with a different compiler, if you are using a unix based system, you could try using GCC if you haven't already, or Xcode if you are using a Mac, and if running windows MinGW has been a popular choice (a GCC solution for windows). Taking into account what others have already said, you could ...


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The structure pointers are created so that they can refer to address.Since normal structure variables can't store the address, this syntax is wrong. struct node head; struct node second; struct node third;


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I have a similar issue. It is due to not installing cygwin/gcc and not adding cygwin_install_path/bin to Path.


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C typically allows you to do operations on a single "data-type". However, if you try to do such operations, C has some preset defaults. For example, in the following code, C will assign the value of a as 0.0000 and not 0.6666, even though you have declared a as float: int main(void) { float a; int b=2, c=3; a=b/c; printf("%f",a); return ...


2

I can now answer the second of your questions: Is this possible without unrolling and if so how can it be done?. The answer is no. I padded the arrays x, y and z to the left and right with plenty of buffer for the below experiment, and changed the inner loop to the following: .L2: vmovaps ymm1, [rdi+rax] ; 1L vmovaps ymm0, [rsi+rax] ; 2L ...


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The nodes are in the heap, that's what malloc is for. To use code without linked list to explain, it's similar to: int *a = NULL; a = malloc(sizeof(int)); *a = 5; printf("%d",*a);


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I doubt that someone can actually diagnose the problem in question without full example, but here is idiomatic way to handle Lua-to-C calls and some comments on the code itself: static int // not int32_t lua_set_popup_memory(lua_State *L) { luaL_checktype(L, 1, LUA_TTABLE); // let alone excessive arguments (idiomatic), or do: lua_settop(L, 1); ...


2

Cast all the radius into a double before calculating and you will get a double as the result like this: double sdough,mdough,ldough; sdough = (PI*(((double)sradius/INCHES_PER_FEET)*((double)sradius/INCHES_PER_FEET))*DOUGH_PER_SQFT); mdough = (PI*(((double)mradius/INCHES_PER_FEET)*((double)mradius/INCHES_PER_FEET))*DOUGH_PER_SQFT); ldough = ...


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Since you mention in the comments that "any text form" will do, here's a way: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main(int argc, char ** argv) { if ( argc != 3 ) { fprintf(stderr, "You need two arguments.\n"); return EXIT_FAILURE; } FILE * infile = fopen(argv[1], "rb"); if ( !infile ) { ...


1

As per Microsoft's documentation: Unlike scanf and wscanf, scanf_s and wscanf_s require the buffer size to be specified for all input parameters of type c, C, s, S, or string control sets that are enclosed in []. The buffer size in characters is passed as an additional parameter immediately following the pointer to the buffer or variable. So what you ...


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How about this. Compiler is gcc 4.9.0 mingw x64: void triad(float *x, float *y, float *z, const int n) { float k = 3.14159f; intptr_t i; __m256 k4 = _mm256_set1_ps(k); for(i = -n; i < 0; i += 8) { _mm256_store_ps(&z[i+n], _mm256_add_ps(_mm256_load_ps(&x[i+n]), _mm256_mul_ps(k4, _mm256_load_ps(&y[i+n])))); } } ...


0

you can't return an array defined in a function as it is allocated on the stack and will disappear after the function has finished. Instead you allocate memory int *array_address = malloc(sizeof(int) * 10); however, you have to manage the memory, meaning you have to "free" it when you are finished with it, otherwise you will leak memory The other ...


1

You can not check for signed integer overflow after the fact, you must check before the fact. This is because Signed integer overflow in an arithmetic operation is undefined behavior in C and C++. Once you have invoked undefined behavior the result of your program becomes unpredictable. For C we can see this by going to the draft C99 standard section 6.5 ...


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In the for loop: for (i = 0; i < steps; i++) { arr[(i * 16) & lengthMod] *= 10; steps is 256 MB and arr[] has 4 MB of elements. Thus if you change the array access to arr[i * 16] you will quickly overflow the array and enter undefined behaviour territory. In the original code you have: lengthMod = sizes[s] - 1; where sizes[] is defined to ...


1

In input_data(), you have: int data[4], result[4]; followed by: arr[0] = data; and: arr[num] = result; Both data and result are automatic arrays, which means they will be destroyed when input_data() returns. So all those pointers you're putting into arr will point to invalid locations once your function returns. Even if it worked, the way you ...


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You can extract words from a line of text using the strtok() function. See How does the strtok function in C work? and http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strtok/. The strtok() function will modify the contents of line[], but I suppose that's OK for this usage because you just wrote a line of input there and you will soon write another line of input ...


1

Actually, not all C programs have to have a main. The ISO C standard supports two types of environments. The first is hosted, and that is the one that requires a main of a specific format (from several allowable ones). Freestanding environments (the second type) have no such requirement and, in fact, there's a lot of leeway for freestanding behaviour at ...


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If you're writing C in Visual Studio, which it sounds like you are, you'll likely have to declare all your variables at the beginning of the function (or block), because it doesn't support a modern version of C that lets you do otherwise. In other words, you'll have to do: int main(void) { double lat1; double lon1; double lat2; double ...


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You are running into errors at your scanf calls. "d" corresponds to an integer not a double, use f instead.


0

it is a matter of standard, check out ansi C standard it states that main function should return int value. Also from operating system point of view returning value from main function is only indicator if program ended properly.


1

Try this as the string: "%d,%d,%[^,],%[^,]" I eliminated the "s" because [...] acts as the specifier. Think of the [...] as a super s.


0

Why all c programs should start with int main ()? This is because: When the operating system runs a program in C, it passes control of the computer over to that program. This is like the captain of a huge ocean liner handing you the wheel. Aside from any fears that may induce, the key point is that the operating system needs to know where inside ...


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This is because of the fact how your code is to be called and the Standard says how it should happen. As to the return value, there is a rule that says that main function has to return the integer as a result of a call to the caller - it should indicate how the program exited.


0

A program has to start running somewhere; this is called its "entry point". The standard entry point for a C program is called "main" because that's what someone chose long ago and there's no real reason to change it to some other name. However, some compilers (actually, linkers) have options to build a program using some other function name as the entry ...


1

Not all C "programs" start with "int main." I put program in quotes to highlight the fact that you can have c files that do not have main in them, such as class definitions. Essentially main is the section of code that tells the computer what to do, and in what order -- all other files can be thought of as helper files that partition the code to make it more ...


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When you execute a program, the first thing to run is initialization code in the C library. When it finishes, it calls the standard entry point, main, with the parsed command line arguments. The int return value from main is the return value of the program.


1

Update swap2 (int *a, int *b) won't change any memory location, it change what a and b is pointing to, when you call swap2(&x, &y), your memory schema will looks like the following: int x [a (address of x)] -> [actual x = 42] int y [b (address of y)] -> [actual y = 9] int tmp = ...


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In order to read only GPA with assignment suppression of additional parameters in the fscanf format string, you will need a format string similar to fscanf (fp, "%*lf%lf%*s%*lf%*lf*", &save);. You must make allowance for the sting characters in the blocks of data or you will experience an input failure with fscanf. An example of isolating GPA using ...


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The first argument for select() is the nfds, the number of fds... not the number of the last fd -- you probably want server_s + 1, here.


1

One possibility is the fact that you are not reinitializing tv before every call to select. Some OSs (including Linux) update the value of that parameter to indicate the amount of time left to wait. It is best practice to reinitialize the timeout value before every call. From the Linux manpage for select(2): On Linux, select() modifies timeout to ...


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Here's an example program that does what I think you want: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #include <assert.h> /* Enumeration, structs, and union for requests */ enum request_type { REQUEST_ONE, REQUEST_TWO }; struct request_one { int something; char data[10]; }; struct request_two { ...


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You incorrectly believe fseek() is not working, when it IS working. The problem is that when you open a file for "append", as in fopen("file.txt", "a+");, then all writes will be appended to the end of the file, regardless of the location of the file pointer. So, what happens is fseek() correctly repositions the file pointer to 7, but as soon as you call ...


1

The void (*)(int, char *, int) is an anonymous parameter of type 'pointer to function returning void and taking three arguments: an int, a char * and another int'. You need to pass the name of such a function (in your case, bar) as the second argument to the function foo. Personally, I'd prefer to see the declaration of foo written with a return type and ...


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As BLUEPIXY stated, the problem was during the building. the index needed to be in 4 for (int i = 1; i < 4; i++) And also, I changed how I printed the list. from while (temp->next != NULL){ printf(""); temp = temp->next; } to while (temp != NULL){ printf(""); temp = temp->next; }


2

foo(1,myfunction(1,&anCharArray,10)) fails with a number of errors. Try instead: foo(1, myfunction) The second parameter of foo function is a function pointer but you were passing the return value of a function call.


1

First of all, you don't have to create two seperate structs to make a linked list .. You can do it like this: struct list { /* struct members */ struct list *next; } Just like that ! Also, In functions you should be aware of pointer decay .. In simple terms, it's when you pass a function an array, the function recieves it as a pointer (which is ...


0

Test and Set cannot be implemented in software without hardware support the way you proposed. It is because TestAndSet above is supposed to be a mechanism to be used to ensure mutual exclusion, but it is not atomic. Atomicity, however, is just another name for mutual exclusion: the internal variables of TestAndSet must be protected by ensuring that two ...


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It is pretty straight forward; the type of the result of a shift operation is the type of the LHS operand. For most binary operators, the result is based on both the LHS and RHS operands, but the shift operators are different. unsigned char uc = 0x08; unsigned short us = 0x0008; unsigned int ui = 0x00000008; unsigned long long ul = ...


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MPI does not allocate memory for shared use across processes. In MPI each process is responsible for its own memory management. If you want to allocate an array of size size on each process then you have to allocate the memory after the call to MPI_comm_size. After that you either initialise the values on each process individually, or you initialise them ...



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