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0

At the moment, your function getNodo is just a front-end for malloc. Itreturns a new, but uninitialised node, whose members are likely to contain garbage. When you dereference aux2->person in attAtEnd: aux2->person->edad=age; you'll get a segmentation fault. You must not only allocate, but also populate your node, i.e. fill it wie sensible data. ...


0

#include <stdio.h> void main(){ char a,b,e; int c,d; printf("A: "); scanf("%c %d",&a,&c); e=getchar(); printf("B: "); scanf("%c %d",&b,&d); printf("%d %d",c,d); }


1

No, %H and %T have nothing to do with the #define. They are probably used by whatever code is processing this text, and probably introduce some application-specific string interpolation.


0

Yes. the tokenizer function [in c] you are looking for is strtok_r(). Please check the details regarding the usage of this function in the man page here. However, this is going to be a tricky job. Best of luck with your efforts.


0

The problem is, that you compare a null-terminated string with a not-null-terminated string. In your function decompress() you need to reserve one more int and add the missing \0 to the copied buffer. char *vysledek = (char*) malloc((maxSize) * sizeof (int) + sizeof(int)); [...] vysledek[index] = '\0';


1

Today, with optimizing compilers (like GCC with -O1 at least), the register keyword is indeed deprecated. Its only meaning is to forbid taking the address of such a declared variable. In other words, register int r; printf("r@%p\n", &r); // WRONG: address of register variabe should not compile. GCC also provides as an extension (also understood ...


0

The file should be opened for reading in binary mode -- thus the rb. Only printable characters will print, and if you are trying to print as a string, only until you reach a binary zero '\0' character. If you want to be sure the file read, you can print the signature characters, which you can find here ...


1

If you want to print the contents of the binary file you need to write the values as hex values e.g. for (i = 0; i < size; ++i) { printf( "%2X ", buf[i] ); if ( i != 0 && (i % 0) == 16 ) { putchar('\n'); } }


0

Below solution works fine, wait_time(int wait_time) { poll(NULL, 0, wait_time); }


1

This is called a Variable Length Array (VLA) and is a C99 feature. If your compiler does not recognise it on it's own then try switching C standards Try: --std=c99 -std=c99 --std=gnu99 -std=gnu99 The manual page of your compiler will be able to tell you the exact flag.


1

In C99 this is valid and called a VLA-Array.


3

Now normally I believe that arrays cannot be initialized during runtime with a variable. That has been true before C99 standard. It is also illegal in C++ (although some compilers, such as gcc, offer this as an extension). Is there a C variant where this is legal? Any C99 compiler will do. I am also seeing arrays indexed from 1 rather than 0 ...


2

This was a feature introduced in C99 and are called VLAs(Variable Length Arrays). These arrays are also indexed starting from 0 not 1 and ending at length-1(Len-1 in your case) just like a normal array.


1

When you get to the last (most significant) bit of 1024, the value of a is 10000000000 (10^10). Except it isn't. Because int is a 32-bit integer, the value of a overflows (twice) and ends up being 1410065408.


0

This should work for you: #include <stdio.h> int main() { int rows, columns; int rowCount, columnCount, count = 0; printf("Please enter rows and columns:\n>"); scanf("%d %d", &rows, &columns); for(rowCount = 0; rowCount < rows; rowCount++) { for(columnCount = 1; columnCount <= columns; columnCount++) ...


1

(char*)malloc(2*sizeof(char)); change to malloc(3*sizeof*buffer); You need an additional byte to store the terminating null character which is used to indicate the end-of-string. Aslo, do not cast the return value of malloc(). Thanks to unwind In your case, with strncpy(), you have supplied n as 2, which is not having any scope to store the terminating ...


1

From man 2 read: On success, the number of bytes read is returned (zero indicates end of file) So the correct behaviour for you would be to return on rdsize == 0. Return value of -1 is for errors (or errno == EAGAIN if the file descriptor is set to nonblocking) only and when that happens you should perror("read"); // print an error message abort(); ...


-1

// the scanf_s function is the secure function for string input, using scanf // this version compiles without any warnings, etc under linux gcc // this version checks for input errors // (except the actual value of the variable inputFunc) // I think the use of a switch() statement would be much more robust // rather than the use of the function ptr table, ...


0

If you don't want to use pointers,then you can return count and assign it to the count variable in main. I've improved your code here with all of it explained in the comments inside the code: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> //Don't forget this header for srand and rand #include <time.h> //For the time in srand #include ...


0

scanf and family can have very unpredictable results reading directly from the stream. If a parse failed everything else is bound to fail afterwards. When using scanf and family it's always recommended to read your data line by line with fgets and then sscanf on the buffer. Try this: information customers[10]; FILE *fptr; fptr=fopen("Customer.txt","r"); ...


3

Approach 1: The "pointer" way: In your code, change void checktable (int a[50], int b[50], int ar,int count) to void checktable (int a[50], int b[50], int ar,int *count) and call it as checktable(a,b,N,&count); Approach 2: The "return" way: Otherwise, the count which is updated in checktable() won't be reflected in main(). However, ...


0

kFSEventStreamCreateFlagWatchRoot flag in function FSEventStreamCreate() cause problem, I don't know why. But when I remove that flag it run in root context and user context also for many number of paths.


0

Well thank you Philipp and Bluepixy, I updated my code: /* * Author: Usia, Sebastian * Date: 21/NOV/2014 * * Input: Two character type variables. * Output: Index number of beginning letter of word. * * Description: Uses an algorithm to find a word in a string and if found * it returns the index number of the first letter of the found word. * */ ...


0

A version in C using successive approximation: unsigned int getMsb(unsigned long n) { unsigned int msb = sizeof(n) * 4; unsigned int step = msb; while (step > 1) { step /=2; if (n>>msb) msb += step; else msb -= step; } if (n>>msb) msb++; return (msb - 1); } Advantage: the running time is constant ...


0

This is an old question but, since I've recently done the same thing .... There is no simple answer. In an ideal world you'd use a machine with huge address space (ie 64 bit), and massive amounts of physical memory. Huge address space alone is not sufficient or it'll just thrash. In that case parse the XML file into a database, and with appropriate queries, ...


0

I eventually understand what was happening. According to this answer on SO, the interrupt is masked while processing the interrupt and the threaded interrupt handler. So it seems I misunderstood the point of request_threaded_irq: it should really be used so that the interrupt handling is in a task scheduled by the scheduler. For my needs, what I really ...


-2

This is build linked error. look at this: --#ifdef _DEBUG --#pragma comment(lib,"opencv_core249d.lib") --#else --#pragma comment(lib,"opencv_core249.lib") <<---- your checked!! --#endif :-)


0

Check the below code: #include <stdio.h> #include<string.h> int search_word_in_string ( char line[], /* ( Input ) */ char word[] ) { int line_idx = 0; int k; int word_idx = 0; int first_letter_idx = 0; /* Finding word. */ while ( (line[line_idx] != '\0') ) { word_idx =0; ...


1

In inc_count: You did not initialized n and m but you are using it in: Need[n][m] = Max[n][m] - Allocation[i][j]; But you have declared: int Need[3][3] What if n and/or m is >= 3 ? Segfault ! Also, you have nested for loops with indexes i and j that goes from 0 to 10, then you are using Allocation[i][j] but you have statically allocated it with ...


1

At first glance, this small piece of code seems to be grabbing the address of something on the stack -- the address of a local variable -- putting it in a register, seeing if it is greater than 1, and executing the jump only if it is. But I am not quite sure why gcc would want to compare the address to the literal 1, because nearly every address is greater ...


2

Some issues with your code: You don't need semicolons after a block of statements (i.e. after the closing bracket }). You have to compare your chars via == and not via = (first is a comparison, second is an assignment). line_idx and word_idx should be zero (because the string you are looking for can also exist at the beginning). first_letter_idx should ...


0

The header string.h provides a function strstr that is tailor made for what you are trying to accomplish. Full example: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> int main() { char *string = NULL; char *substr = NULL; char *p = NULL; printf ("\nEnter string : "); scanf ("%m[^\n]%*c", &string); ...


2

There are a number of ways to recreate strstr. The following is a quick implementation using the inch-worm method, where you simply use pointers to search for the beginning of the substring in string, then if found, compare every character in substring with the corresponding character in string. If all characters match, the substring is found, return a ...


0

You can refer the below program. The simplest one I can think was this: int main(void) { int a=12345; char c[10] = {0}; /*c is array if characters to hold the digits*/ sprintf(c, "%d", a); printf("Int : %d, array of digits: %s\n", a, c); /*To print each digit one by one*/ a = 0; while (c[a] != '\0') ...


2

How about we provide the idea, and you write the code? Sounds good? Take the integer. use modulo [%] operator to take out the last digit. Store in an array. divide by 10 to right-shift the original number by 1 digit. iterate 2 & 3 untill the result of 3 becomes 0. Finally, once you're done, if you've stored straightaway, you need to reverse the array ...


0

You can use x % 10 to get the units (rightmost) digit of x. Each of those digits can be placed into an array. You can use x = x / 10 to divide x by ten, effectively shifting all digits right. You can detect if you've run out of digits when x has been shifted to the point where it's equal to zero. You can. if you need them in the right order, swap them by ...


1

When you allocate storage for a string that you are going to copy you need to add an additional character for the '\0' terminator, so: arg[1] = (char *) malloc(strlen(command_argument)); needs to be: arg[1] = malloc(strlen(command_argument) + 1); otherwise the subsequent call to strcpy will write beyond the bounds of the allocated ...


0

Since you are programming a calculator, speed is not your concern but the number of reliable digits is. So, you could try to use a double precision library. It uses 64-Bit-doubles but has only about 200 FLOPS at 16MHz CPU clock and much less at higher-order calculations like exp(), log(), or sin(). Thus, it will take a second after having typed in the digits ...


1

Since select() is complaining about a bad parameter, and you are passing only two parameters to it, that means either fd_max is invalid or readFd is invalid. The documentation states: EINVAL nfds is negative or the value contained within timeout is invalid. Since you are not using the timeout parameter, look at your fd_max variable, make sure you ...


1

Both of your quicksorts are wrong. This line: quicksort(v+last-1, n-last-1); Should be: quicksort(v+last+1, n-last-1); I fail to see why the one with the rand() is any better than the other one, though.


1

fopen( bobby.txt , "wb" ); This is wrong. fopen( "bobby.txt" , "wb" ); The array has nothing in it and your are trying to copy nothing to a file? This sounds contradictory. When there is nothing in the array don't write it to a file. If you want to check whether the file exists or not check the below link. What's the best way to check if a file ...


0

Check the below code: #include<stdio.h> int main(){ int arra [100]; int i ; int k; int j = 0; /* index from 0 */ printf("Keep entering numbers and press q once done \n"); while (scanf("%d",&i) == 1){ /* scan for integers */ arra[j++] = i; } printf("\n"); for(k = ...


0

Give input as $./rpn "5 10 *" All argument in "" and in program you will get all argument under argv[1] then parse that string by space separation. By this way you do need to handle any wildcard/special character at special way.


5

The shell is expanding the glob before executing the program. You quote the glob not because of GCC, but because of the shell. If you don't want this behavior then use a shell that does not honor globs.


6

First off, massive kudos for testing the return value from scanf, most people just blindly assume it works. It's just a shame you're using it in the wrong way :-) You want the loop to continue as long as the return value is 1, meaning that you managed to scan an integer. That means it should be: while (scanf ("%d", &i) == 1) { That also means that ...


0

I'm seeing a problem with the following code: char *args[6] = {"tar","-xzvf", strncpy(args[2],argv[0]), "-C", "/home/bg/Desktop /Project/", NULL}; Specifically, with the strncpy for two reasons: 1) strncpy() takes three arguments, and you have only specified 2, and 2) it is attempting to copy argv[0] (the program name) into args[2], which is an array of ...


0

The code compiles and works - see it in action here Some points: This is C code, not C# The return(0); is placed within the while loop - this will prevent it from asking the user for more than one run. Move this below the end of the while loop. The declaration of the array holding the various function pointers to the arithmetic operators should not be ...


0

This is because modprobe inserts modules by reading a file called modules.dep under /lib/modules/$(shell uname -r)/. So after compiling and installing your module make sure you recreate this dependency file once again. Here is how it is done After installation of your module, check whether it is copied to /lib/modules/ if it is found, then go to ...


0

Over the line i have posted below from your code, You are ending the main method with the second brace. That is not a very good idea, as you have code below that brace. void(*func[4])(double, double)={&addition, &subtraction, &division, &multiplication}; (*func[inputfunc-1])(inputnum1, inputnum2); return(0); } //end while } //end main ...


0

can't comment yet but wanna help so posted my comment as answer. void(*func[4])(double, double)={&addition, &subtraction, &division, &multiplication}; (*func[inputfunc-1])(inputnum1, inputnum2); return(0); } I think this part is where your error is coming from. debug it



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