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0

You could try something like this: switch(s & 7) { case 0: /* _process_mem_64 */ break; case 1: case 3: case 5: case 7: /* _process_mem_8 */ break; case 2: case 6: /* _process_mem_16 */ break; case 4: /* _process_mem_32 */ break; } This involves only a single jump into a jump table, and does not require a call ...


2

4*sizeof(char) is an int. So its size is 8 on a 64-bit machine.


0

Then you need to write a program that lets you modify the binary file. Read the ELF file specifications. Then write a program that modifies the ELF program and section headers and adds the data to the .rodata section.


0

what I think you are trying to do is this char index[20]; printf("Enter Name: "); scanf("%s", index); printf("Welcome player %s How are you today?", index); The reason we do the scanf is because we want user input, whatever the user will put in the scan f will come out as the output for your printf. We use %s because index is a ...


4

%c will eat up a character, whether it be a digit or whitespace. You probably want it to skip all whitespace and then eat up a character. You can do that by changing the format string from %c to  %c; that is, inserting a space before the %c.


0

is this a problem with the way i am printing the pointers Code never attempts to print pointers. Code attempts to print *y, y[0], y->memory. These are types mine, mine, and unsigned. To print a pointer like y, use printf specifier "%p" and cast to (void *) if the pointer is not all ready a void *. printf("%p\n", (void *) y); To print the ...


0

The warning you get is because you forgot to #include <stdlib.h>, so malloc is not declared, so the compiler assumes it should return int. This can lead to all kinds of fun problems. (And you should remove those casts.) The other problem is in this line: (*arr[1])->i = 3; Postfix operators (like []) bind tighter than prefix operators (like *), ...


4

printf() has special format specifiers that enables you to inject variables into the resulting string. In your case you would want to do it like this: printf("Welcome player %d. How are you today?", index); See more info here.


2

Your problem is the line (*arr[1])->i = 3; Because the subscripting operator's evaluation precedes the dereferencing's evaluation it is equivalent to the following: (*(arr[1]))->i = 3; This is obviously wrong. You need (*arr)[1]->i = 3; therefore. Notes: do not cast the result of malloc add #include <stdlib.h> to resolve the ...


0

224.0.0.1 is a reserved multicast address for addressing all hosts on the local segment. All network interfaces are always listening on this multicast address. So if a packet is sent to 224.0.0.1 on the port your application is using, your app will receive the packet whether you asked to listen to that particular multicast address or not.


2

The macro is not available by itself, but there are a couple of preprocessor symbols that are useful: #ifdef _WIN32 //Always defined also on X64 OS #define FOLDER_SEPARATOR "\\" #elif defined (__linux__) //Normally defined by linux systems #define FOLDER_SEPARATOR "/" #else #error Unknown system! #endif It's a common way to define a value ...


0

When you do this: printf("%x\n",*y); Or this: printf("%x\n",y[0]); You're feeding a struct mine to the %x format specifier. This is undefined behavior, which means anything could happen. In the case of your particular compiler on your particular machine, the %x specifier is probably picking up the first 4 bytes of the struct mine that's being ...


1

Gibbon1's answer is correct, but I think example code is helpful for this sort of question. #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { union { unsigned int x; struct { unsigned int a : 1; unsigned int b : 10; unsigned int c : 20; unsigned int d : 1; } bits; } u; u.x = ...


1

The recurrence relation is: T(1) = a T(n) = b + T(n/2) The first part comes from the case where the loop variable equals 1, in which case only the comparison at the top of the loop executes. The second line comes from the constant amount of work done in the loop body, b, plus the time to execute the loop with the updated loop variable value. The first ...


1

my guess: a flexible struct would be one that could handle any age and any name. A unsigned int field would handle any age (within reason). A char * field would handle any name. The struct itself would be: struct nameAge { unsigned int age; char * pName; }; an instance of the struct would be: struct nameAge myNameAge; Setting the age field ...


4

You are on the right track. However, there is no "flexible structure". You want to use a flexible array member (avail since C99) in a struct: typedef struct { int age; size_t name_size; // size of the array, not length of the name! char name[]; // Flexible array member } Structure; int main(void) { Structure *one = ...


1

Empirical approach: First reduce the "educational noise" from the code by simplifying it and add an iteration counter (c). Then look at the result (N,count) and after a while you see, that 2 ^ count = N for all N in [1,2,4,8,16,..]. So the complexity Compl(loop) = O(log_2(N)). let rec loop a c = match a with | x when x > 1 -> let ...


0

You mechanism is simply wrong. It isn't about a SetEvent that comes to early. If the Event is set, it might be set "more than once". PipeClientSendThread should wait for the event, and if the event is set it should send all elements that have reached the queue. You code post 3 elements into the queue, but the event is set once, the thread runs and sends ...


0

If you want to write the JavaScript library in TypeScript then you can use the npm package emscripten-library-decorator. You can then write the library as a class with static functions and export them to asm.js code by adding a decorator @exportLibrary to the class. Functions depending on others need a @dep decorator with the other required functions as ...


1

What you want to do is find how many times this operation is called, so consider this: after each call a is divided by 2, so if M = N/2 then T(M) = T(N) - 1. Now, each iteration of this loop divides N again so you get the following: T(N) = T(N/2) + 1 = ... = k + T(N/(2^k)) The stop condition is this: a>1 so you need to check when N/(2^k) <= 1 ...


1

The loop condition is wrong. You want while(m!=0 || n!=0) (i.e. while at least one of them is not zero) instead of while(m!=0 && n!=0), otherwise the answer will be wrong for things like 999 9, it will incorrectly stop after one iteration and report 1 carry operation whereas the correct answer should be 3. Think of it like this: you only want to stop ...


4

Your write statement is writing to stdin rather than stdout. I'm surprised it works at all. This is generally why you should use constants rather than literal values, because it's less prone to this sort of error: write(STDOUT_FILENO, s, strlen(s)); (STDOUT_FILENO, STDIN_FILENO, and STDERR_FILENO are defined in unistd.h)


3

You write into stdin, I think you want this write(1, s, strlen(s));


0

You can checkout the link at link at cplusplus reference which describes the straight forward way of reading lines from a file in sequence. And this link also at cplusplus reference describes the straight forward way of tokenizing a string based on delimiters (to split the line to 4 separate strings) using these links I managed to put together the ...


0

Since the first matrix has width x height entries, you want to loop from 0 to width-1 (not width-1+border) and from 0 to height-1 (not height-1+border). Similarly, you want to add border/2 to the index of the second array when assigning. for(i=0;i<width;i++){ for(j=0;j<height;j++){ fmatr[i+(border/2)][j+(border/2)]=sudo[i][j]; } }


1

Since C passes parameters, including pointers, only by value, you need to add an extra level of indirection (i.e. an asterisk) for any parameter that you wish to modify inside a function. This provides the clue to what's going on: normally, you need two asterisks for a 2D array, i.e. char **twoD. However, since init allocates a new array, you need an extra ...


-1

Y->memory is not the same as y[0] or *y. The first is a member of mine, while the latter two are instances of the entire mine object. Using an object as a argument to printf is not well defined. Some implementations put the entire object on the call stack, others pass it by reference. In any case, you are not printing out integers, so %d is the wrong ...


0

After some days spent researching and staring both at Linux kernel and FUSE source code, I understood what was happening. First, I have to say that the release after fgetattr wasn't executing when performing the open system call, but when calling close. So I have edited my question to remove it. Well, my main problem was that strace showed me a call to the ...


0

Removing buf[i]== EOF did work. Add '\n' to the end of each buf and check for buf[i]=='\n' instead of EOF.


0

You can't run pre-compiled code within NaCl or PNaCl. You have to use the compilers provided by the SDK. There are three main reasons for this: NaCl is an execution sandbox which relies on crafting machine code (x86-32, x86-64, ARM, MIPS) in a very particular way. This is regular machine code from the CPU's point of view, but allows the sandbox to run a ...


0

given this code: scanf("%d",&n); for(i=0;i<n;i++) { scanf("%d",&arr[i]); printf("\n"); } the user will see a prompt for the initial input, then only a blinking cursor. A second prompt for the actual values, along with the directive to only enter one value per line would be good coding practice. When calling scanf() (and family of ...


0

If you just want to call a function every second, here's a simple solution: #include <pthread.h> #include <unistd.h> void TimerFn(void) { ... } void* timer(void* arg) { for (;;) { TimerFn(); sleep(1); } return NULL; } ... pthread_t timerThread; pthread_create(&timerThread, NULL, timer, NULL); Is there some reason this ...


-1

There are a lot of errors: In C, unlike C++, a typedef is undefined until it is completed. When defining struct Next the type Next_t is not defined yet. so you have to refer to struct Next The variables d and arr are intended to get values from sub. You have to define them as pointers to structures, but pass the pointer to so the function can modify ...


0

for (fileidx=0; fileidx<filenum-1; fileidx++) Does this work for one line files? Shouldn't there be <= ?


2

the posted code does not even come close to compiling. strongly suggest compiling with all warnings enabled (for gcc at a minimum use: -Wall -Wextra -pedantic to enable warnings Fix the warnings. Then re-post the code Just for your information: use: int main( void ) or int main( int argc, char *argv[] ) place a prototype for each function, other ...


0

It might be implementation specific. I'm focusing on Linux. You probably want printf("system@%p\n", (void*)system); and that does gives you the address of the system function. You could store it in a function pointer: int (*funptr)(const char*) = system; then a later call to (*funptr)("date") behave the same as system("date") so system (or the value ...


3

Take the four consecutive integers k, k+1, k+2, and k+3 and sum them up. This yields 4k + 6. If an integer n is the sum of four consecutive integers, it means that n = 4k + 6 for some integer k. Equivalently, this means that n - 6 = 4k for some integer k, or equivalently that (n - 6) mod 4 = 0. That might help you significantly simplify your program.


1

This is how you can find address of function mapped into your executable. $ gdb program Reading symbols from ...done. (gdb) print main $1 = {int (int, char **)} 0x400d61 <main> (gdb) print exit $2 = {<text variable, no debug info>} 0x400910 <exit@plt>


0

It's generally helpful to look at the first warning or error outputted, since later errors are often the result of a domino-chain of problems stemming from the first one. In this case, the first error is matala0103.c(13): error C2061: syntax error : identifier 'Next_t' Meaning the compiler can't figure out what Next_t means. This is because you are ...


0

G.G above said that you cant restore the tree with only one traverasl. I will fix what he said a bit - If you have preorder or postorder traversal you can restore the tree. if you have only inorder traversal it is impossible. if you have only preorder or postorder traversal, create the in-order traversal yourself by just sorting this list. now you can use ...


0

Here is a method I used on an old project. One big drawback to this method is the lookup table and enum are dependent on each other and need to be kept synchronized. I got this method from an online article quite a few years ago, but don't remember where. This is a complete example: #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #define CMDSIZE 2 ...


1

An alternative explanation. In the code before the recursive call, in the next to last nested call, rest is set to point to the last node, and in the last call, rest is set to the NULL at the end of the list, but in this case the function returns without updating head_ref==rest, so after the second return from recursiveReverse, rest points to the last node, ...


2

You must use Terminal capabilities (a.k.a Termcaps). They are special characters which can be interpreted by your terminal (e.g moving the cursor back and forth, or clearing the screen). Here's what Wikipedia says about Termcap databases : A termcap database can describe the capabilities of hundreds of different display terminals. This allows programs ...


1

This is done by writing certain special control characters to stdout, which can do things like set the color, move the cursor, etc. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_escape_code for more info. However, if you want your editor to be portable, or you don't want to worry yourself with details, you may want to consider using the ncurses library ...


5

No an array of array is not the same as a double pointer. You really should read that up, there are a lot of FAQ and answers around. Then the error that you receive is for the doubly empty [][]. In C, when you declare an array with [] the compiler tries to compute the size of the array from the initializer. This only works for one []. For the second you ...


1

What program are you using to make the web request? Some web clients may also request an e.g. favicon.ico file, which may account for the second request to the fcgi process: 127.0.0.1 - - [29/Aug/2015:16:02:11 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 32 "-" "..." 127.0.0.1 - - [29/Aug/2015:16:02:11 +0000] "GET /favicon.ico HTTP/1.1" 200 32 "http://127.0.0.1/" "..." ...


0

As already stated, you should use uintptr_t to proces the pointers. Your code is, however, wrong, as you test the distance, not the page. Also, you foget that computers use powers of two. 8000 is none; that would be 8192. similar for 4000. The fastest approach for the test would be: #include <stdbool.h> #include <stdint.h> // this should ...


0

1/2 is an integer divided by an integer resulting in an integer value i.e, 0(.5 is truncated ) 1.0/2 is an integer divided by a double value . So 1(the integer value) is promoted to a double type and then division occurs giving a double value. So the resulting value is 0.5. 1.0/2.0 results in division of a double by another double and the result is ...


0

f = 0 + 0.5 + 0.5 = 1.0 d = 0.0 So, output of the program: 1.000000 0


4

**B+2 is equivalent to (**B) + 2 **B is equal to B[0][0] which is 2 in your array. Hence the seen output. If you want 6, what you need is *(*B + 2) More info on this here and here



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