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0

If you don't mind pulling in the numpy python module in your python code, you can do the following: In the SWIG interface file: %{ #define SWIG_FILE_WITH_INIT %} %include "numpy.i" %init %{ import_array(); %} %apply(float ARGOUT_ARRAY1[ANY]) {(float outarray1d[9])}; void rf(float outarray1d[9]); Only the last two lines are specific to this example, the ...


3

It seems there is a typo '#include<conio.h> ^^ The C standard does not support any more function gets. Instead you should use standard function fgets. This condition while(ptr1!=ptr2) is wrong for strings with an even number of characters because it will be never equal to false and the loop will be infinite. The following statement ...


0

Parameters in C are pass-by-value. Arrays not withstanding (the expression value of an array is a conversion to pointer-to-type containing the address of the first element), a value is what you pass, and a value is what you get. The result is parameter variables are local to the called function. Your code desires to modify front at the caller, not just ...


3

You need save head->next first, and then call the func revserse recursively. Besides, you cannot judge head->next, it maybe null struct node* reverse(struct node *prev, struct node *head) { if(head == NULL) { /* To make the last node pointer as NULL and determine the head pointer */ return prev; } struct node * next = ...


-1

upgrading Glibc is not safe. because many of your programs are linked against current version of glibc and upgrading CAN break them. unless you apply patches from your distro. but again I don't recommend that. you can however use another glibc if you compile your programs static or for example use a bash script to change LD_LIBRARY_PATH when you want to run ...


0

header files are never compiled. So in case of error you will never be able to debug. go here http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/programming-9/compiling-c-header-files-344397/


0

You have not used a outer loop with nlines. That's why it is only reading a single maze. You can do following things: for(i = 0; i < nlines; i++){ // your code. } and if you do not need nlines any where else then, while(nlines--){ //your code }


1

One case where common non-inline functions are coded in a common header is for a multi-processing (as opposed to multi-threading) application. The code for each process has one source file that includes the common header with those common functions.


0

General array slicing can be implemented (whether or not built into the language) by referencing every array through a dope vector or descriptor — a record that contains the address of the first array element, and then the range of each index and the corresponding coefficient in the indexing formula. This technique also allows immediate array ...


0

As you start a.out via starting bash which in turn starts a.out you capture the errors from bash not the ones of a.out. To get around this set cmd to [/path/to/a.out].


0

char* myfirstName = (char*)malloc(strlen(firstName)+1); In the above line, you're using firstName uninitialized. Strlen(firstName) will only work when firstName has some length which you passed to the function without giving it. Same goes to lastName and nickName.


0

You have some out-of-bound accesses in your code. First, your "raw" version, which only prints the permutations, doesn't work for me, because you access element a[n]. Array indices include 0, but exclude the array length. A loop like: for (j = i; j <= n; j++) ... where j is used to index an array of length n should ring some alarm bells. So: } else { ...


4

scanf is just reading from its input stream. If the input stream is a pipe, and the other end of that pipe is associated with a tty (which is usually the case if you are interactively entering data by pressing keys on a keyboard), scanf will return as soon as it reads data that completes its format string (or fails to match it). The tty, however, if it is ...


0

You should not use strlen() within malloc() to determine the number of bytes, you want to allocate into memory. Since, the character pointer variable, you are specifying within strlen() are "firstName,nickName,lastName", which are storing addresses of unknown location, which causes the given error. Therefore You should specify number of bytes, you want to ...


3

Does it keep reading the stream until '\n' is encountered? Normally stdin is in line buffering mode (_IOLBF, see setvbuf). Whenever the buffer is empty, stdin waits for a whole new line to be entered, i.e. waits until you press Enter and \n is inserted into the buffer: On Input, the buffer is filled up to the next newline character when an input ...


1

When you call scanf it immediately waits for input. in your first example, input is provided in the form of "cl.txt". In your second example, no input is provided until you press a key. Synchronous IO will block on its executing thread until it receives input.


2

The functions you are written to enter data do not use their parameters (or they use them incorrectly). Thus there is no any sense to declare them like char* getFirstName (char* firstName ); Within the functions there is allocated memory and pointer to the memory is returned. Moreover this statement char* myfirstName = ...


1

I'm also new, but I think your problem is here: char* firstName; firstName = getFirstName(firstName); char* myfirstName = (char*)malloc(strlen(firstName)+1); you are implementing strlen on uninitialize char pointer. You have to specify a max len (#define MAX_SIZE 64) and use it as you do not know the length of the names. Also consider this, ...


0

Try this code if you want to separate digits in the same order without using arrays. //Separate number digits #include <stdio.h> #include <math.h> void main() {int x,y,n = 0; scanf("%d",&x); //counting digits y = x; while (y != 0) {n += 1; y /= 10;} //printing separated digits int i; for (i = ceil(pow (10 , (n-1) )) ; i != 0 ; i /= 10) ...


1

What I want know is, when I call the functions on the source.cpp from different classes, should I get different global variable for each instance, or the global variable just share the memory ?. Given your code, there will be only one global variable for all instances of class. Instances of another class have no bearing on the global variables in ...


3

In both of your examples, you are trying to access the content after the end of the array arr, which is undefined behavior. I know this maybe because that one is in the stack and the other is in the heap or so. Not really, in the second example, arr is in the stack, while in the first example, arr is in the static storage, not the heap. But I ...


3

An enumerated type is essentially a named integral value. That enumerated type is associated with an underlying integral type that can represent all the named values. That underlying integral type is required to be able to represent all the unique named values, but its actual type is implementation defined. In this case, the numeric value of saturday ...


2

A global variable only exists once in memory and will be shared by the whole program, i.e. every instance/function will access the same memory and modification made by one instance/function will be visible to all. I guess you already know that global variables should be avoided. But if you can't modify source.cpp (and have to use it as is), the situation ...


0

Your first allocation method allocates a region of memory with 200 chars as you explicitly code the amount of memory you want. Your second allocation method will only allocate space for the constituent pointer. So allocate the struct first, then allocate space for the constituent pointer explicitly. array *str = (array*)malloc(sizeof(array)); int n = 200; ...


2

Maybe you need to write a strword() function like this. I'm assuming you can use the classification functions (macros) from <ctype.h>, but there are workarounds if that isn't allowed either. #include <assert.h> #include <ctype.h> #include <stdio.h> char *strword(char *haystack, char *needle); char *strword(char *haystack, char ...


0

You are using "%d" to print a float. That leads to undefined behavior. Instead of printf("\nEl valor del cociente es: %d",(polinomio_->polinomio->cociente)); use printf("\nEl valor del cociente es: %f",(polinomio_->polinomio->cociente)); // ^^^


2

Did I miss to allocate something else? Yes. You allocated memory for an array but not for name inside the array. You need: array *str = malloc(sizeof(array)); if ( str == NULL ) { // Deal with the error } str->name = malloc(200);


1

@Weather Vane well answered the major issue. Below are additional points. #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { // Check argc if (argc < 1) Print_Error_And Quit(); int n = atoi(argv[1]); FILE *fp; fp = fopen("data.dat","r"); if (fp == NULL) { perror("Error"); } ...


1

I was only able to find a draft of the C89 specification, and I'm no C expert, so I might be misunderstanding it. But its section 3.5.2.2 says that The identifiers in an enumerator list are declared as constants that have type int and may appear wherever such are permitted. [...] Each enumerated type shall be compatible with an integer type. I ...


1

It's fairly straightforward bit masking and shifting. the (num & 0x000000ff) zeros out all but a single byte of the word. The << 24u shifts it by 24 bits, or 3 8-bit bytes, putting it at the other end of the word. The next three lines swap the remaining 3 bytes in a similar manner. Then the b1|b2|... combines those bytes together to make the ...


5

It's so you can mask bits off and set bits. At least that's the simple answer. In C, & is the bitwise AND operator and | is the bitwise OR operator (which are a little different than the logical && and || used for boolean operations). Take a look at the truth tables below. AND OR A B X A B X 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 ...


0

To understand the problem, consider what happens if the user enters 2. The first if statement evaluates true and the two_assesments function is called. The next three if statements fail. Then we get to the if (c==6). That also fails, so the else is evaluated. And here you have two problems. First is the semi-colon. Because you have a semicolon after the ...


1

Functions which are not marked as inline cannot go in headers because if they get included twice in your program, the linker will give you an error. Note that methods inside classes are treated as inline. As long as you only use templates and inline code, you can put your code in a header. But then it gets compiled once for each source file you have that ...


0

In C++, there is no difference, both are same. Both definitions work in C also, but the second definition with void is considered technically better as it clearly specifies that main can only be called without any parameter. In C, if a function signature doesn’t specify any argument, it means that the function can be called with any number of parameters or ...


0

You have an extraneous semicolon. Try this: ... for(i=0;i<strlen(string);i++){ for... Notice the lack of a ";" before the body of the loop. The body of the loop in your code is empty because it's just a semicolon. The part that you intend as the body of the loop is only executed once afterwards. During that one execution you're just printing the ...


2

%d means to read an int. %f will let you read a float type. So change that in your scanf and you should be set


3

Use %lf in the scanf since a and b are of type double. %d is for integer input.


1

Typically a self-hosted system compiler alone does not provide the full Standard C environment including runtime libraries. Typically the underlying system provides most, if not all, of the libraries (and headers), while the compiler just compiles. So, if you need some specific functions that are not provided on a given system then you will have to write ...


2

The problem is here else if (c=!7); { . . . You have a ; after if () I would suggest you use a switch statement like this switch (c) { case 2: two_assesments(); break; case 3: three_assesments(); break; case 4: four_assesments(); break; case 5: five_assesments(); break; case 6: six_assesments(); break; default: ...


0

Firstly, in the examples you have given (int[]) {1, 2, 3}, 3 -> location 3 (int[]) {5, 15, 4, 7}, 4 -> location 2 3 in the first example is in the same position as 4 in the second example, so they should technically have the same location. I'm not sure which code you've used to determine these locations, but it's inconsistent. Your third and ...


0

A preemptive kernel will usually provide the ability for an interrupt to set an event that a higher priority thread is pending on. As for the interrupts, one way of implementing something like a state machine is to use nested pointers to function, similar to an asynchronous callback, but with optional nesting: For example: typedef void (*PFUN)(void); /* ...


1

Diagnosis Your problem is in this code: void split(Lint l, int x, Lint *mx){ Lint mxtmp=NULL; while (l!=NULL){ if(l->value > x){ *mx = (Lint) calloc(1,sizeof(Nodo)); Your assignment to *mx means you've lost your original pointer, and can't update your list properly. There are few platforms where using calloc() won't ...


1

typedef struct slist *Lint; typedef struct slist { int value; Lint next; } Nodo; void split(Lint l, int x, Lint *mx){ Lint mxtmp=NULL; int i = 0; while (l!=NULL){ if(l->value > x){ *mx = (Lint) calloc(1,sizeof(Nodo)); (*mx)->value = l->value; (*mx)->next = NULL; ...


0

This may or may not have anything to do with it, but I think it's worthwhile mentioning it: You are playing with fire! Global variables are dangerous, particularly in an environment which works with events, such as gtk. It's quite possible that the parameters you store in the global variables are changed by another event. Particularly dangerous is iter ...


1

You might be able to do that but: You cannot (in general) store your executable in the heap as your doing it here with malloc (nor in the stack for the same reason) because if your hardware supports it, your OS probably marks those areas as readable, writable but no executable (or at least it should do it). You cannot just take the code of a compiled ...


0

be sure to compile your function with NO optimization as that will corrupt the bitbang operation. this is the code from the maxum site for the spiReadReg function. (which looks like were you got your code. However, this is just a guide for the 'general' sequence of operations for communicating with the maxim 1481 part. the accel. part needs several setup ...


2

Are you sure those constants are good in this context? I think you are looking to the wrong constants, these are not supposed to be used like the documentation says. The constants you mentioned refer to "statuses" (not "types") that can not overlap. Example: overflow will never happen at the same time of an underflow, it's absurd. The documentation is ...


6

That comment is in reference to the event constants. What you're looking at are not event constants, but rather status constants. Event constants would be for example: #define SL_PLAYEVENT_HEADATEND ((SLuint32) 0x00000001) #define SL_PLAYEVENT_HEADATMARKER ((SLuint32) 0x00000002) #define SL_PLAYEVENT_HEADATNEWPOS ((SLuint32) 0x00000004) #define ...


0

Given the combination of calls, the OP is using ncurses (rather than say, yet another conio question). Given that (a complete program would help), the chunk beginning pause() is meaningless, since ncurses will return KEY_RESIZE if one remembers to use keypad(stdscr, TRUE); in the initialization section, as well as updating the LINES and COLS values. The ...


1

Using & does bitwise comparison. So a & b gives a non-zero results if any of the bits are set in both a and b. That is not the same as comparing the values (for a given non-zero value of a, there are multiple values of b that can give a match).



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