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0

You are getting error because the variable tc is not a pointer type variable. You are using tc->image_data=img; which is used while accessing or entering data in the structure members. This symbol -> denotes the value is accessed or entered using pointer. The variable tc can be used user '.' operator instead of '->' operator. So try using it and ...


0

I'm answering because I found this early on in my search. Cat continually reads until it gets an empty response and your module will never give an empty response. The best way to do this would be to place if(*ppos > 0){ return 0; } at the beginning of the function and add the length of the data you are sending back to *ppos before exiting.


1

On both versions, you are not setting fdmax correctly. If any sockets in the master are greater than the value of sockserver, select() will ignore them. The first parameter of select() must be +1 higher than the largest socket in rfds. Also, in the old version, there is no guarantee that rfds = master is a valid operation. On platforms where it is ...


0

As stated by feepk in the comments, you do not need to manually do any of the RTSP setup, as VLC does this for you using live555 library. You can open an RTSP connection using the libvlc_media_new_location function, then pass to your media player instance. For example: // You must create an instance of the VLC Library libvlc_instance_t * vlc; // You need a ...


-3

You can just do this: create( created, args ); BOOL create( Foo* created, args ) { // do some creation of *created return TRUE; // if successful }


0

I wrote some simple code to simulate your problem. struct Node{ int val; Node *left; Node *right; Node() :val(1){} }; int main(){ int size = sizeof(Node);//size = 12Bytes const int N = 10e5; const int factor = 5;//12B*5*10^5 = 6MB Node* ptrArr[factor]; //Test 1, costs 57MB! for (int i = 0; i < factor; i++){ ...


3

The most likely explanation one can come up with from what you provided is that at the point of the call the function create is undeclared. A permissive C compiler assumed that unknown function create returned an int and generated code, which effectively truncated the pointer value or, more precisely, sign-extended the assumed int return value into the MSB ...


0

This is most likely overwriting random memory: struct stat* buf; stat(result->entry, buf); It should be: struct stat buf; stat(result->entry, &buf);


0

Firstly, I think you've made a mistake here: char *fn = malloc(strlen(cfile+7)); sprintf(fn, "/Files/%s", cfile); You probably meant this: char fn[strlen(cfile) + 8]; sprintf(fn, "/Files/%s", cfile); You might notice that I've rearranged it a little; I think you wanted to add 7 to the return value of strlen, not to the argument of strlen. I've written ...


0

Based on my past experience...and I have no way to quantify this for you....ODBC + C is going to be the most performant solution in terms of accessing SQL Server. It is the fastest, most direct way of getting data in and out of SQL Server. However, it's up to you to optimize your code for doing this. All of the benchmark software I've ever used for SQL ...


0

I modified the code using by strcmp() command and removing * than i compiled code with cygwin64. My Error Code: $ gcc --version gcc (GCC) 4.9.2 Copyright (C) 2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc. This is free software; see the source for copying conditions. There is NO warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. $ gcc -o ...


4

Your swap function is fine... the problem is that you access outside the array bounds in the inner for loop. In that loop, you have j ranging from 0 to the last array index, so values[j] will be at most the last element of the array... however, you're working with two elements at a time, values[j] and values[j+1]... and on the last iteration, values[j+1] is ...


2

Given your Stack type, your push and pop functions could be: void push(Stack **s, int value) { assert(s != 0); Stack *node = malloc(sizeof(*node)); if (node == 0) { …handle memory allocation error… } node->next = *s; node->object = value; *s = node; } bool pop(Stack **s, int *value) { assert(s != 0 && value != 0); ...


1

The modulo operator: int arr[6]; ... int index = 1; for(int cnt = 0; cnt < 6; cnt++) // 6 times { cout << arr[index - 1] << endl; // -1 because it´s 0-5 instead of 1-6 index = (index - 1) % 6 + 1; }


4

if (0 < pos) { stack = head; } This line at the end of the function actually doesn't do much. You pass in the pointer to the data as stack, but in C, this pointer itself is copied by value. This means that while the data points to the same spot, the pointer itself is something different. At the end of the function, you modify this copied value, and ...


0

Here is a great way to understand the difference between a while loop and a do / while loop. (But first, a side note: do / while are actually pretty rare in practice. You don't usually need them. The good, clean algorithms that you usually want to write, that naturally do the right thing for any input, and that properly do nothing when they're given no ...


1

You should probably use strcmp() instead of == to check if two strings are equal. You also don't seem to be using variable c even though you are checking it against EOF. And are you sure c should be a char *? Be more descriptive in what kind of error you are getting and write code in smaller steps so it is easier to find your bugs.


1

I believe that the d_name field of dirent* is not null terminated. So strcpy() on this may lead to a segmentation fault later on. If this is the case you should use strncpy()


0

Combining Jonathan's and Felix's answers with my own favorite preprocessor trick X-Macros yields the following. #define Fields(_) \ _(Link, 0x1, 8) \ /*enddef Fields() */ #define HASH # #define GenState(name, mask, shift) \ HASH define name ## State (((x) >> (shift)) & (mask)) Fields(GenState) To which additional fields may be easily ...


0

You need to switch this line: st[i] = stcp[j]; To this: stcp[j] = st[i];


4

I think you mean the following char stcp[100]; int i = count, j = 0; while ( i != 0 ) stcp[j++] = st[--i]; stcp[j] = '\0'; As for your original code then you have to exchange operands in this statement st[i] = stcp[j]; and string stcp must be appended with the terminating zero. Take into account that function main should be defined in C like int ...


2

This is a tricky question, something that needs probably more depth than a StackOverflow answer. I'll try, nonetheless. Tokenizing the input is the first part of the compilation process. The objective is to simplify the task of the parser, which is going to make an abstract syntax tree with the contents of the file. How do we simplify this? We do recognize ...


0

these functions seem capable of determining at compile time if a passed in buffer is allocated statically or dynamically They're not. This is a simple use case for the type system; in one case you're passing an array (and, remember, array types include the dimension!). In the other, you're passing a pointer. That pointer could be to a piece of cheese ...


0

From a cursory look at the code for netsh interface set interface name "oldname" newname="newname" It looks to be using INetworkConnection::Rename. In order to get the connection you want, I believe you would have to use the INetSharingManager to enumerate all the connections available. Then you would have to iterate through them to find the one you want ...


0

The provided code is a sequential algorithm that relies on previous values. If you are running it with a global_work_size > 1, you are just performing same calculation over and over. The opencl implementation should compute primes less than N sequentially, then run a test in parallel for numbers [N+1; N*N] if they are divisible by any of those primes and ...


2

C standard provides no built-in data type for operations on arbitrary size data. You need to use character array to store the result of multiplication of each digit with each single digit while multiplication. Long time ago I implemented this for small factorial problem on SPOJ: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include ...


0

That depends on where you call gtk_window_get_size. Citing the official documentation: If window is not onscreen, it returns the size GTK+ will suggest to the window manager for the initial window size... So my guess is: your window is not onscreen when you call gtk_window_get_size. This related question is an example.


1

If you compile your libraries on the command-line, you can compile them to have bitcode by adding the -fembed-bitcode-marker compiler flag.


3

If you take a look at the reference documentation for sprintf_s, _sprintf_s_l, swprintf_s, _swprintf_s_l, you'll find the following declarations: int sprintf_s( char *buffer, size_t sizeOfBuffer, const char *format [, argument] ... ); template <size_t size> int sprintf_s( char (&buffer)[size], const char *format [, argument] ...


0

I made bellow changes to compile.bat and it worked reason behind was both .pyd and .dll files were not created together. I had to run the command with /Fe<module name>.pyd for .pyd file and /OUT:<module name>.dll for .dll compile.bat set msvc=%userprofile%\AppData\Local\Programs\Common\Microsoft\Visual C++ for Python\9.0\ call ...


0

There is a Microsoft macro called _countof which will give the size of static arrays. This is probably being used in the implementation of the printf_s-related safe functions. According to this answer, there is a C++11 non-macro way to do this (get the size of a static array) as well.


1

You can't overwrite string literals because they are generally in the read only memory section of the program, and they are always not writeable. You can do something to prevent accidentally overwriting a string literal, something that you must avoid because it's undefined behavior to do so. To avoid it, you can use the const qualifier const char *string ...


0

The problem is that "hello" is a string literal, which are normally stored in read-only memory. So you don't have write privileges to that memory. You need to declare a char array instead of just assigning a pointer to read-only memory. char string[] = "hello"; When you attempt to write to memory that you don't have access to, the result is often called ...


0

So after more struggle I found my final answer. The block if (accepted_connection = accept(server_socket, (struct sockaddr *)NULL, NULL) < 0) { //code } Doesn't work. My read later on was blocking because accepted_connection wasn't a valid socket. Changing to (accepted_connection = accept(server_socket, (struct sockaddr *)NULL, ...


2

You probably want to read in deci as a string rather than as a single character. Also note that you can't do a simple comparison on string constants, and that string constants are surrounded in double quotes, not single quotes. char deci[5]; int hours,min; printf("Enter a 12-hour time: "); scanf("%d:%d %s",&hours,&min,deci); if(strcmp(deci,"PM") ...


5

Well: Hope the following helps you. Unlike for and while loops, which test the loop condition at the top of the loop, the do...while loop in C programming language checks its condition at the bottom of the loop A do...while loop is similar to a while loop, except that a do...while loop is guaranteed to execute at least one time. A sample syntax would ...


6

You take input char deci. It's a single character. Change the condition: if(deci=='P') // only P is able to identify 'PM'. you can work with this single char { // }


3

What you suggest is NOT possible. Your compiler can create code for ONE specific target platform, specified by the "host triplet", for example on my linux machine: > gcc -dumpmachine x86_64-linux-gnu Meaning of the host triplet ist $(machine)-$(vendor)-$(operatingsystem). GCC (and probably some other compilers) can be built as a cross compiler. This ...


0

Map the file into memory. See the MSDN example "Creating a View Within a File" for details on how to do this. Your use case is a bit different, but the principle is the same, and you'll end up using the same Windows functions. (If you're in a 64-bit process, you can probably map your entire file into memory; otherwise you'll need to map it in chunks and ...


1

You're not checking the return value of the first strtok() call. Also, in your while loop you check whether tokPtr is NULL, but then update it in the first line of the loop body before using it. You need remove the initial set of eTable[xIndex][yIndex].str, and move the second strtok() call to the end of the while loop: tokPtr = strtok(currentLineStr, ...


4

One way to do it is to expose the total size of the opaque type and make used declare the objects of your opaque type as unsigned char [N] buffers. For example, let's say you have some type OpaqueType, internals of which you want to hide from the user. In the header file (exposed to the user) you do this typedef unsigned char OpaqueType[16]; where 16 is ...


4

There are a couple things wrong here. First let's address your third loop. The program should print stars, spaces, and then stars again, so that third loop shouldn't be printing spaces. Also, we're printing the same amount of stars on either side of the spaces, so the third loop will actually just be the same exact code as your first loop! Secondly, here ...


5

A macro cannot define another macro, but it can call another one (the preprocessor won't stop until there are no non-terminals left) So, how about something like this? at least saves some typing ... #include <stdio.h> #define SHIFTMASK(x,s,m) (((x) >> (s)) & (m)) #define LinkState(x) SHIFTMASK(x, 8, 0x1) #define Whatever(x) SHIFTMASK(x, ...


2

Did you modify this from a program which originally was supposed to have spaces and asterisks the other way around? You forgot to change the other space-printing loop to print asterisks… =) for(space=0;space<rows-i;++space) // <- name of variable misleading printf("*"); // <- ok for(j=i;j<=2*i-1;++j) printf(" "); // <- ok ...


2

SREG is the Status Register. It is #define'd in one of the AVR headers, so you are probably missing an #include (perhaps avr/io.h or avr/common.h).


0

I know this is really old, but this is what works for me: context[@"MyClass"] = ^MyClass*{ return [[MyClass alloc] init]; }; Then from JavaScript: var myClass = new MyClass();


4

As Art suggested, one possibility is to use a macro to create an inline function: #define BIT_FIELD(name, lsb, mask) \ static inline int name(int value) { return (value >> (lsb)) & (mask); } The parentheses are needed for lsb and mask, in case someone gets fancy with the invocation. You can then create functions as needed: ...


0

Thanks everyone! Here is my solution while(fgets(buffer,BUFSIZ,fp) != NULL) { char *token; token = strtok(buffer, " "); while(token != NULL) { token = strtok(NULL, " "); **if(token != NULL)** { printf("%s\n", token); } } } fclose(fp); As was indicated in other answers, the problem wasn't ...


1

There are a couple of errors: INADDR_ANY is in host byte order and needs to be converted to network one like htonl(INADDR_ANY). But it does not matter since constant INADDR_ANY is defined as 0. This char * server_socket_read_buffer[100] should be char server_socket_read_buffer[100] This read(accepted_connection, &server_socket_read_buffer, ...


1

You are passing in server_socket_read_length = 0 which causes a maximum read length of zero. Pass the buffer size. The declaration of server_socket_read_buffer is incorrect as well. Probably you should allocate a bigger buffer (like 4KB) on the heap. Also remove the sleep. The rest is probably working because nc obtains a connection and you are able to ...



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