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0

Been years since I did any Pro*C, but I remember when I first came across this in an earlier version of Pro*C, and you had to use indicator variable to check if the value was NULL or not. That changed however when Oracle introduced the STRING datatype. I liked this so much I even started to TO_CHAR numbers and store them to STRING. See this from that ...


0

In Java, all the variables are passed by value. Primitives are actually copied and object variables are references anyway, meaning that the value of an object variable is actually the reference -> you are passing the reference's value. Nevertheless, you always pass by value, same as in C++, you will pass by value if you don't use the reference explicitly. ...


0

You have at least two problems here. The line that was (usually) causing your segfault is this: varsdb = ct.cast(varsd, returnStruct_t) This is because you're trying to cast a void * to a returnStruct_t, rather than to a returnStruct_t *. Since a returnStruct_t is much larger than a pointer, there's a good chance this will run off the end of an allocated ...


1

When performing file write, is disk accessed every time a file write is made or chunks of memory blocks are written at a time? This is up to the kernel. Buffers are flushed when you call fsync() on the file descriptor. fflush() only flushes the data buffered in the FILE structure, it doesn't flush the kernel buffers. Will it improve performance if ...


3

The language execution model says that an ordinary (non-volatile) variable cannot be changed by "external forces". I.e. if your code flow does not explicitly change the variable, then from that code flow's point of view the variable cannot possibly change. (Besides what's defined by C11 for multithreaded execution). You have to manually "designate" ...


1

Convert the whole byte sequence from BCD to an integer type, add, then convert back. Something like these functions should work for the conversion, but be aware that you may need a longer type than unsigned if you need to support completely arbitrary 5-byte BCD sequences (but 5 bytes of BCD suspiciously coincides with the range of a 32-bit integer). /* * ...


1

1. When performing file write, is disk accessed every time a file write is made or chunks of memory blocks are written at a time? No. Your output isn't written until the output buffer is full. You can force a write with fflush to flush output streams causing an immediate write, but otherwise, output is buffered. other 1. Will it improve performance if ...


0

It is operating system and implementation specific. On most Linux systems -with a good filesystem like Ext4- the kernel will try hard to avoid disk accesses by caching a lot of file system data. See linuxatemyram But I would still recommend avoiding making too much of IO operations, and have some buffering (if using stdio(3) routines, pass buffers of ...


4

You compute the modulo 16 of the received number. If it's 9, you add 7, else 1.


1

You want a library providing an HTTP client service. I would recommend libcurl for that purpose. It is usable (on most operating systems) in C code. Standard C99 does not know about HTTP or URLs. You need to use some operating system (like POSIX ones, eg Linux) and some libraries. You might alternatively wanting a library providing some HTTP server ...


0

Your problem seems to be a classical situation to use a key/value-storage like a hash table (in c there are e.g. ghash and uthash), where MyRequest.data (aka MyRequest.desiredDataId) would be the key and the DataValue.data would be the value. Your solution with the void pointer is pretty much the most trivial implementation to that: since all keys are ...


2

Your client and server are just not coordinated. The client writes the message 5 times as quickly as it can, and the server reads five times as quickly as it can. In your example output, evidently on your first call to read() the client has sent the message twice, and on the second call to read() it's sent it a further two times. You read() up to 256 ...


0

Don't underestimate the cost of even basic arithmetic using floating point on a processor with no FPU. It seems unlikely that floating point is necessary, but the details of its use are hidden in your matrix_to_polar() implementation. Your current implementation considers every pixel as a candidate - that is also unnecessary. Using the equation y = cy ± ...


0

The a ? b : c ; has nothing to do with format strings. It is a shorthand for if (a){b} else {c}. In your case this translates to: Print a string (the printf("%s ") part); if the char-pointer (c's string "equivalent") at row[i] is non-null, then print row[i], otherwise print the string "NULL" (the row[i] ? row[i] : "NULL" part).


0

I ran into a similar problem with OpenCV. You're likely missing one or more .lib files to the Linker. You can add them by: Right-Clicking on your project in Visual Studio. Selecting "Properties" Take note of: "Linker > General > Additional Library Directories" Go to "Linker > Input > Additional Dependencies" I specified OpenCV lib directory to VS under ...


1

The ? operator is something called a conditional operator (or ternary operator). It can be thought of as an "in-line conditional statement". The code you've shared is equivalent to: if(row[i] != NULL) { printf("%s ", row[i]); } else { printf("%s ", "NULL"); } Conditional operators can be used as arguments to functions or assignments. They follow the ...


3

It has nothing to do with string formatting. It's a piece of syntactic sugar called a ternary operation. It looks like this: <condition> ? <if_true> : <if_false>. Expanded, it is equivalent to this: if (row[i]) { result = row[i]; } else { result = "NULL"; } printf("%s ", result);


2

This is called the trenary operator. If the statement is <condition> ? <res1> : <res2>, then if condition is evaluated as true, the statement is evaluated as res1, otherwise as res2.


0

I wrote the following dirty hack to work around the apparent inability to access Go structures from C. While this hack is not guaranteed to work, it works for those cases were Go and C agree on how to lay out structures, which happens to be the case for all those cases I am interested in. For each Go structure I want to access type JewelTarget struct { ...


0

Short answer: I think your strings contain garbage! Strings in C must be terminated by a Null byte ('\0'). When you create a char array on the stack (or heap) the contents of that array may be filled with whatever junk your memory happened to have at the time. Try running this small program to see what I mean. One might predict this program will print 3 ...


1

In your code you are allocating memory for ReturnStruct* pointer not the actual struct Instead of ReturnStruct* new_returnStruct = (ReturnStruct *)malloc(sizeof(new_returnStruct)); try this ReturnStruct* new_returnStruct = (ReturnStruct *)malloc(sizeof(ReturnStruct));


2

There are some errors in your code: This line hould be ReturnStruct and not new_returnStruct as parameter of sizeof: ReturnStruct* new_returnStruct = (ReturnStruct *)malloc(sizeof(new_returnStruct)); Are you sure that sizeof(Test) == sizeof(Pee)*3 or in fact, why you're using Pee instead of Test ? Test* varsStruct = (Test*)malloc(sizeof(Pee)*3);


0

In you derived class you should set reuseFirstSource = true calling OnDemandServerMediaSubsession constructor : OnDemandServerMediaSubsession(UsageEnvironment& env, Boolean reuseFirstSource, portNumBits initialPortNum = 6970, Boolean multiplexRTCPWithRTP = False); This will create only ...


0

scanf reads characters from the standard input, interprets them according to the format specifiers here "%d" for integers and stores them in corresponding arguments. To store them you must specify &variable_name, it will specify the address location where the input should be stored. Your scanf statement should be: //For storing value of height scanf(" ...


0

I do recommend Javonet if you look for real simplicity. It handles all the in-process memory related tasks in the background, including garbage-collector propagation, data translation or threads management. With Javonet you are more or less working like you would do in .NET directly or just using regular JAVA library. The code syntax is different but this I ...


0

you could create a simple function to catch strays from scanf void clear_input_buffer(void) { char buffer[100]; fgets(buffer, 100, stdin); } then include it after scanf scanf("%s", name); clear_input_buffer();


1

if (!strcmp(&ans1, "y")== 0) is wrong, which may be modified to if(ans1 != 'y'). You should do similar modifications to if (!strcmp(&ans2, "y")==0), if (strcmp(&ans2, "y")==0), if (!strcmp(&ansRep, "y")==0) in your code. And for scanf("%c", &ans1);, you may rewrite it as follows: scanf(" %c", &ans1);


0

Removing \n in scanf("\n%s" [...] and adding a space before %c in scanf("%c" and scanf("\n%c" (removing \n) may help.


1

scanf requires the the format (your "%d") and also a reference to the variable where should put the value the was read. height and weight are int not references to int. You should use the operator & to pass the reference to scanf. Your code should be: printf("What is your height in inches?\n"); scanf("%d", &height); printf("What is your weight in ...


0

First things first: ans1 and ans2 are chars; you are doing strcmp(&ans2, "y") - here, "y" is a string (NULL terminated array of characters) because it is in double quotes. Before anything else, you should replace all your comparisons of those variables with something like if(ans1 == 'y') Also, when you read a character you should add a space in front ...


1

You are going to have to declare the bitmap member as IntPtr and marshal it manually. If the caller allocates the memory do so with Marshal.AllocHGlobal. And then use Marshal.Copy to copy between the unmanaged memory and your managed representation of the bitmap. Or pin the managed byte array that represents the bitmap. If the callee allocates the memory ...


0

Your typedef is missing a calling convention, so C's default calling convention (usually __cdecl) is used instead. send() and recv() use the __stdcall calling convention: typedef int (__stdcall *iofunc)(SOCKET, const char*, size_t, int);


2

It prints the value 8 because you're asking for the size of the pointer (x). You cannot print the size of a block of allocated memory - you'll have to track that yourself. This is why I don't recommend using realloc; allmost everyone I see asking about it is using it wrong.


3

Realloc returns a pointer, so x is of pointer type. sizeof(x) is returning the size of a pointer, which is 8 bytes in this environment.


0

for (i=1; i<=n+1; i++) for (j=1; j<n, j++) doIt (...) As you mentioned the worst-case complexity is given to be O(n^3). So, in case of nested loops, the main thing to focus is that the first loop guides the inner loop,i.e., the inner loop will generally run no. of iterations(not necessarily always) than the outer loop! As in your question, the ...


0

If you can't change the function declaration, then you need to allocate the memory for the structure in main. void foo(Sp ptr){ ptr->num = .... } In main: Sp itemPtr = malloc...; foo( itemPtr ); Or this in main: S item; foo( &item );


0

I think you intend to ask the mechanism of how the variable can compare the array. if that's the case, The pointer that has been declared in your example stores the initial address of the array's first element and the ending point of the string can be determined by the detection null character that which in turn is the ending address of the array. With ...


0

In is for statement for(ptr = a+4, i=0; i <=4; i++) pointer ptr is set to a+4 It could be done also the following way ptr = &a[4]; If you tray to output the value pointed to by the pointer as for example printf( "%d\n", *ptr ); you will get 4. That is the pointer points to the last element of the array. Inside the loop there is used ...


0

void foo(Sp *p){ *p = malloc..... *p->num = .... } then Sp new = NULL; foo(&new); if you want to keep the prototype of the function as void foo(Sp p), you have to go: Sp new = (Sp) malloc(sizeof(S)); foo(new);


1

You should understand that in C, arguments are passed by value (not by reference). So when a function changes a formal argument, no change happens in the caller function. Hence, pass the address of your pointer. void foo(S**pp) { *pp = malloc(sizeof(S)); if (!*pp) { perror("malloc"); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); }; // fill *pp } and call S* ptr; foo ...


1

ptr[-i] decays into *(ptr + (-i)). At the first iteration, when i = 0, ptr[-i] accesses last element of a array, because initially ptr was set to be equal a + 4, which means - take address of beginning of a and add 4 * sizeof(int) (because ptr was of size int). On every next iteration, when i is incremented, previous element of array is accessed.


1

The reason it works is because the [] operator does pointer addition. When you reference a[x] Whats actually happening is its taking the memory address of a and adding the sizeof(int)*x So if you set ptr to a+4, you are going to a+sizeof(int)*4 then, when you put in a negative value, you move backwards through the memory address.


1

There are two ways to use const key word to a pointer: int my_int = 3; const int* pt = &my_int; //prevent to modify the value that pointer pt points to int* const ps = &my_int; //prevent to modify the value of pointer ps: //it means the pointer is a const pointer, you can't modify the value of the pointer //The value of the pointer ps is a memory ...


1

a+4 gives a pointer to the fifth element of a. So ptr refers to that location. Then the loop counts i from 0 up to (and including) 4. The dereference ptr[-i] is equivalent to *(ptr - i) (by definition). So, since i is 0 and ptr is a+4, it's equivalent to a+4-0, then a+4-1, then a+4-2, and so on until a+4-4, which is (obviously enough) equal to a.


10

First, recall that in C the expression ptr[index] means the same thing as *(ptr+index). Now let's look at your expression again: ptr is set to a+4 before the loop; then you apply -i index to it. Therefore, the equivalent pointer arithmetic expression would be as follows: printf("%d", *(a+4-i)); This expression iterates the array backwards, producing the ...


4

If you have for example the following code char c = 'A'; char *p = &c; const char *cp = &c; then it means that you can change variable c using pointer p but you may not change it using pointer cp For example *p = 'B'; // valid assignment *cp = 'B'; // compilation error Thus function declaration int strcmp(const char *s1, const char *s2); ...


2

I'm the author of the routine in question. As some others have said, the key thing is that the reads are all aligned. While reading outside the bounds of an array is undefined behavior in C, we're not writing C; we know lots of details of the x86 architecture beyond what the C abstract machine defines. In particular, reads beyond the end of a buffer are ...


2

This worked, because passing non-const in place of const is allowed. It is the other way around that is prohibited: char *hello = new char[20]; char *world= new char[20]; strcpy(hello, "hello"); strcpy(world, "world"); if (!strcmp(hello, world)) { ... } The const in the declaration is meant to tell the users of the API that the function will not ...


2

It appears to be a bug in gcc, corrected in a later release. Here's a small program I've written to illustrate the problem. #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> int main(void) { const char message[] = "hello"; #ifdef ASCII_ONLY const char search_for[] = "h"; #else const char search_for[] = "Ʃ"; #endif char *non_const_message ...


2

Since you've found that the offending call is a useless one with a null argument, the simplest workaround seems to be adding if (!p) return; at the beginning of dmalloc's free.



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