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1

It should be noted that the reason we can't put C-structs into NSArray isn't because of anything special about structs. Instead, we should consider NSArray to be a special type of array. We can put structs in arrays in Objective-C. We know this because C programmers put structs in arrays. NSArray (and NSMutableArray and all the other NS collection ...


-1

Pointers arithmetic doesn't support the operation (pointer + pointer). The only operation allowed is (Pointer + Integer) so the result is a pointer. To get the offset you need to cast both pointers to an integer type. And the resulting value is an integer not a pointer. Example: int offset = (int)ptr - (int)heap; printf("ptr : %p\n", ptr); printf("heap : ...


0

because c Language can access the elements of array by their indexes thus index start from 0 to n-1 where n is a number of elements in your array so in your case u can access elements from 0 to 4 indexes if u deal with array of characters maybe this works because of null terminator '\0' also u may not get an errors and get random results because its ...


0

Pointer arithmetic only makes sense for a specific type. In this example, the int type is size 4 but the pointer subtraction is only 1. #include <stdio.h> int array[2]; int *a, *b; int main(void){ a = &array [0]; b = &array [1]; printf ("Int size = %d\n", sizeof(int)); printf ("Pointer difference = %d\n", b-a); return 0; ...


3

Arrays indices in C start at 0, so your oxen and yaks arrays range from 0 to SIZE-1. You're outside the allowed boundaries, as the compiler rightly warns you about.


1

Because C is zero-indexed, oxen[SIZE] is really trying to deference a fifth element that does not exist, not the fourth element that you intend. Use the index [SIZE-1], instead.


0

I wrote you a little code to show you how would this work. Idea is to have dynamic arrays for both workers and arrivals/departures. If you know how to dynamically allocate a memory for some array a for example: int *a; a = (int*) malloc(100*sizeof(int)); Then you know how to do it with structs: struct s_name *my_s; // s_name is some random name of ...


0

You could use compiler specific alignment attributes/pragmas, but I think it's best not to use structs in this way unless you really need the performance. Just write functions to marshall between the struct and a buffer. You won't have to worry about the platform endianness this way either.


1

In the function Enqueue() you have only copied the string pointer to your structure. In your first case that works, because all the four strings have different pointers to string literals. But in your second example, you are storing the pointer of your data entry name, and the contents of this string change with each entry. Each structure store the same ...


0

I'll let you answer to you own question with the information about memory I'll give you : The memory is composed of different parts, and here you speak about 2 off them : the one the computer give (the mapped region, like your char cwd[1024]) and the one you can attribute (the unmapped region, like your struct dirent** file;), all this memory is staked on ...


0

Your A^(-1) matrix is close to singular, therefore dgesv fails. You can try to use dgesvxx http://www.netlib.org/lapack/explore-html/d3/dca/dgesvxx_8f.html


0

Call the size of a machine word w (often w = 32 or 64), and the total number of 4KB memory pages m. If there are g gaps between already-allocated blocks, and there is some free length-n block that fits entirely within a machine word (and you are happy with choosing a smallest such block, rather than one that straddles a boundary between two words), then it ...


0

You have not searched the whole array - you return at the first element no matter what. intarr_result_t intarr_find( intarr_t* ia, int target, int* i ) { if (ia == NULL || i == NULL) return INTARR_BADARRAY; for (int x = 0; x < ia->len; x++) { if (ia->data[x] == target) { *i = x; return ...


1

Your code reports that the element was not found if the first element in the array is not the one you're looking for -- it runs into the else branch during the first loop pass and returns INTARR_NOTFOUND from the function. Instead, you have to check all elements and only report that nothing has been found after the loop has ended unsuccessfully. For ...


0

I've solved the problem as the same way. Just unplug the bt device and upload. After this step, plug again and connect to dc. Thats OK. working. The source of the problem is serial ports as i understand. BT module using 9600 port and disconnecting the connection between computer and arduino.


0

char c; long pos; pos = ftell(file); c=fgetc(file); while (c!=EOF) { fseek(file, pos, SEEK_SET); fputc(++c, file); fflush(file); pos = ftell(file); c=fgetc(file); }


-1

use: while ((c = fgetc(file )) != EOF) and do fputc to file2 not to same file!!


0

The xxd is not a standard UNIX tool. It is actually part of VIM and is used for implementing its hex editor function. VIM is an optional tool and is not universally available. The GNU objcopy, on the other hand, is part of GNU binutils and generally is preinstalled on all GNU systems. In general, when one needs to include a binary file into a program, ...


0

On Linux, you should read time(7). It suggests to use the POSIX 2001 clock_gettime which should exist on recent MacOSX (and on Linux). On Linux, running on not too old hardware (e.g. less than 6 years old laptop or desktop), clock_gettime gives good accuracy, typically dozens of microseconds or better. It gives measures with seconds and nanoseconds (in a ...


0

Because when calling the program via ssh a dup on stdoud is made by ssh, so when ssh try to end it cannot because the stdout has also another channel opened. I try to give you a better answer: stdout is the channel number 1 if i remember correctly. Making the dup we have also the new channel 3 that is pointing to stdout. When ssh try to close the channel 2 ...


1

It is hard to say without knowing precisely your application, but your interrupt handler looks quite reasonable. Generally for multi-tasks systems it is advised to do the least possible in interrupt handlers, because while an interrupt is being handled the different tasks on the systems are not being scheduled any more. This can be a lot more complicated ...


1

Like this? hello.h #ifndef INCLUDED_HELLO_H #define INCLUDED_HELLO_H void (*get_hello(void))(void); // or, better: // typdef void(*funcptr)(void); // funcptr get_hello(void); #endif hello.c #include "hello.h" #include <stdio.h> static void hello(void) { puts("Hello!"); } void (*get_hello(void))(void) { return hello; } main.c #include ...


1

Yes, it is possible. However, the string is not "allocated", it just exists. You have to be sure there is something valid at that memory location before using the pointer.


1

If the number of workers is not known ahead of time, but once known will be fixed, dynamically allocate an array of WORKs. If the number will change over time, you can either use realloc to do the above but change its size when needed, or use a more dynamic structure (like a linked list).


2

char string[128]; defines a statically sized array of chars. There is no need to allocate memory for it, but, on the other hand, there is no way to resize the memory portion. To use a dynamically sized array use char *string; with string = malloc(128), string = realloc(string, newsize) and free(string) when you are done.


1

The fastest (not sure if that's what you menat by "effective") way of doing this is probably something like void char2bits1(unsigned char c, unsigned char * bits) { int i; for(i=sizeof(unsigned char)*8; i; c>>=1) bits[--i] = c&1; } The function takes the char to convert as the first argument and fills the array bits with the ...


0

char string[128]; allocates space, so string is not a true pointer. If you had string defined as follows it will work: char *string;


1

int n1, n2, i1,i2; int status; status = scanf("%d.%n%d%n", &n1, &i1, &n2, &i2); if(status == 2) printf("%d%0*d\n", n1, i2-i1, n2); else if(status == 1) printf("%d\n", n1);


1

Take the value, right shift it and mask it to keep only the lower bit. Add the value of the lower bit to the character '0' so that you get either '0' or '1' and write it into the array: unsigned char val = 65; unsigned char valArr[8+1] = {}; for (int loop=0; loop<8; loop++) valArr[7-loop] = '0' + ((val>>loop)&1); printf ("val = %s", ...


1

If we look at the source code for clock() on Mac OS X, we see that it is implemented using getrusage, and reads ru_utime + ru_stime. These two fields measure CPU time used by the process (or by the system, on behalf of the process). This means that if usleep (or fgets) causes the OS to swap in a different program for execution until something happens, then ...


2

You're encountering a known bug in Microsoft's C Runtime. Even though the behavior is not conforming to any ISO C standard, it won't be fixed. From the bug report: However, we have opted to avoid reimplementing clock() in such a way that it might return time values advancing faster than one second per physical second, as this change would silently break ...


4

A fast way to solve this problem is to scan the bits of the number until you find two consecutive 1s. When this happens, you want to fix it. In other words, you want to make a number that is slightly greater than the current number. How much greater, exactly? Consider the bits on either side of the 11: ...11... We'll say that 11... is the suffix of the ...


0

I haven't actually compiled and tested this, but I think it can be done in constant time like this: int getNext(int x) { int invx = ~x; int dbl0 = invx & (invx >> 1); // Find all consecutive zeros in x dbl0 = (dbl0 & -dbl0); // dbl0 holds the lowest bit where there were two consecutive zeros in x x |= dbl0; x &= ~(dbl0 ...


1

If you have a block of code inside the loop that needs to run once for every value in your list, it's possible to generate one item in the list per iteration with the following code. This prevents repetition. int i, j = 10; for (i = 2; i <= j; i += -1 + 4 * (i%2)) { printf("%d, ",i); }


0

It is nothing specific. Meaning that on the surface it looks like a C declaration, but it is not well-formed. It is illegal and as such it means nothing. Firstly, it appears like a two-dimensional array declaration, but in C language an array declaration is required to specify all sizes except possibly for the very first one. Your declaration omits the ...


0

The syntax of this declaration is that foo[][] declares a 2-D array (or it would, if the second bound had a dimension specified - as it stands that's illegal); and then the rest of it is: int **bar(); // with bar = foo[][] which is a function taking unspecified arguments and returning int **. However, since bar is an array type here this attempts to ...


1

You could use bit operators as recommended. #include <stdio.h> main() { unsigned char input_data = 8; unsigned char array[8] = {0}; int idx = sizeof(array) - 1; while (input_data > 0) { array[idx--] = input_data & 1; input_data /= 2; // or input_data >>= 1; } for (unsigned long i = 0; i < ...


0

Check this: void on_treeview_row_activated(GtkTreeView *treeview, GtkTreePath *path, GtkTreeViewColumn *col, gpointer data) { GtkTreeModel *model; GtkTreeIter iter; model = gtk_tree_view_get_model( treeview ); if ( gtk_tree_model_get_iter(model, &iter, path) ) { gtk_tree_model_get(model, &iter, ...


1

As your wish use "\n". And use code something like this. You will get serious like what you asked. But careful with "\n".. Int a=0; for(i=1;i<n;i++){ a=a+1; if(a%2==1){ printf("%d \n",i+1); }else{ printf("%d \n",i-1); } }


0

Your function pick change the projection matrix with gluperspective (to zoom on the picking area), but it fails to restore the previous matrix state: it can be easily fixed by wrapping the the drawing part of the function with a set of glPushMatrix and glPopMatrix while in matrix GL_PROJECTION mode. void pick( int button, int state, int x, int y ) { ...


2

int i, x; printf("input x : "); scanf("%d", &x); for(i=1; i <= x; ++i){ printf("%d ", i & 1 ? i+1 : i-1); } printf("\n");


2

The loop can be written in various ways. For example the following way #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { int x; scanf( "%d", &x ); for ( int i = 1, j = 1; i <= x; i++, j = -j ) { printf( "%d ", i + j ); } puts( "" ); return 0; } If to enter 10 then the output will be 2 1 4 3 6 5 8 7 10 9


0

You can use the WM_ACTIVATE message. Windows sends this message when a window is activated or deactivated. If the user switches to another application the current window of your application receives a WM_ACTIVATE message telling it that it is being deactivated. Here is a little example to set/remove the topmost flag when the user switches to another ...


5

for(i=2; i<=j; i=i+2) printf("%d %d", i, i-1);


1

Your program has undefined behaviour because you are returning pointer to the first element of a local array that in general case will be destroyed after exiting the function. So you have to allocate the array in the heap dynamically. The other problem is that you do not append the output string with the terminating zero. The function woild look simpler ...


0

Here is similar problem explained: http://stackoverflow.com/a/6269273/250944 (p.2) Headers is ok, but you should read something from client first and only then write response, here is diff for your code snippet with added code for reading data: @@ -8,6 +8,8 @@ #include <arpa/inet.h> #include <err.h> +#define MAXMSG 16384 + char response[] ...


0

Your algorithm is O(n). You can improve your code by changing your algorithm. You can cache this sums in a cacheData array. ( cacheData[i] = sum of fibnacci series from 1 to i ) Calculate this array for all sum which are less than 10^7 . Then use Binary search to find the first sum which is less than input threshold in O(LogN).


0

Signals are in C because signals were how you communicated with a process in the original version of UNIX. They are a fairly simple way of allowing your process to respond to external requests such as "re-read my config file", for example. The K&R chapter is a good intro, but read the C standard to see the minimum for what is defined. In particular, ...


5

The simplest and most natural way is to test if sum >= 1000000.


2

char *output = malloc(sizeof(char) * (size+1)); If you want memory to be dynamically allocated using size. Once you are done using this memory please free it. free(output);



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