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0

A few errors here: You're defining your array as int *array[3] i.e. an array of int *, however what you probably want is int array[3], i.e. an array of int. Next, as was mentioned elsewhere, array[i++] = p is invalid because you're trying to assign a char * to an int * (or an int if you first apply the first fix), which is invalid. You want to convert the ...


1

You most certainly can do it, at least inside functions: cnst.rs: #[no_mangle] pub static X: i32 = 42; cnstuse.c: #include <stdint.h> #include <stdio.h> extern const int32_t X; int main() { char data[X]; printf("%lu\n", sizeof(data)); return 0; } Compilation: % rustc --crate-type=staticlib cnst.rs note: link against the ...


0

It is because both extremities of the pipe have allready be opened... First was opened with the CreatePipe call, the other was with the first CreateFile call. You should not try to open one time more the pipe, but simply read from the hPipe HANDLE : const char * pipeName = "\\\\.\\pipe\\pipe"; const char * buffWrite = "SOME TEXT"; unsigned buffLength = ...


0

What version of libssh do you have? "versions 0.5.1 and above have a logical error in the handling of a SSH_MSG_NEWKEYS and SSH_MSG_KEXDH_REPLY package. A detected error did not set the session into the error state correctly and further processed the packet which leads to a null pointer dereference. This is the packet after the initial key exchange and ...


0

There is a fast way to initialize array of any type with given value. It works very well with large arrays. Algorithm is as follows: initialize first element of the array (usual way) copy part which has been set into part which has not been set, doubling the size with each next copy operation For 1 000 000 elements int array it is 4 times faster than ...


2

You need this: node *insert_node(node *head, node **last, node x) { node *temp; temp=create_node(x); if(head==NULL && head== *last) { head=temp; *last=temp; head->next=NULL; (*last)->next=NULL; } else { (*last)->next=temp; (*last)=temp; ...


1

You never assign newsockd to the result of accept. accept returns a new file descriptor related to the client socket. Change your code to : newsockd = accept(sockd, (struct sockaddr*)&theirs,(socklen_t*) sizeof(theirs));


3

Regarding the error In your code, array[i] is of type int *, which cannot be used as the operand of multiply operator. To quote the standard, chapter ยง6.5.5 , Multiplicative operators Each of the operands shall have arithmetic type. Regarding the warning That said, array[i++] = p; looks very wrong. array[n] is of type int *, and p is of type ...


2

In your code, after the first entry head pointer will point to new value. Because of you are assigning the return value of that calling function. But last value will not be affect. Because of your are calling that as a pass by value. At next time head == last will be fail. It will go to else block, and you are accessing the last->next=temp; It is ...


0

I use this option: isBitSet = ((bits & 1) == 1); bits = bits >> 1 I find the answer also in stackoverflow: How do I properly loop through and print bits of an Int, Long, Float, or BigInteger?


0

when your program starts, each variable gets a place in memory: int i = 3, *j, **k ; in your case, we know these adresses got decided: address of (int i) = 65524 address of (int* j) = 65522 address of (int** k) = unknown the operator & gets the adress of the variable, so you get the output you observe.


0

There is a fast way to initialize array of any type with given value. It works very well with large arrays. Algorithm is as follows: initialize first element of the array (usual way) copy part which has been set into part which has not been set, doubling the size with each next copy operation For 1 000 000 elements int array it is 4 times faster than ...


1

Because you are printing the pointer to k in the first printf statement, not the actual value of k. k holds the value of j's reference, so if you wanted the two statements to be equal, just print k.


4

You are expecting *k and &j to be same. They are different type int * v/s int ** and possibly different value. Never use %u to print addresses rather use: printf ( "\nAddress of i = %p", (void *)*k ) ; On the other hand, if you compare &j and k, those should be same. For example: printf ( "%p v/s %p\n", (void *)&j, (void *)k);


0

Point 1: use %p to print the address. Also, cast the corresponding argument to (void *) Point 2: *k (type int *) and &j (type int **) are two different things. Maybe you wanted to print either of k and &j (both int **) *k and j (both int *)


0

When your program start, the OS kernel decides, based on many criteria, where to put your program and how to map it into memory. So, when you start it several time in a row, the memory location may or may not change. This is why you can't hard-code absolute memory location in your program, you always pick a start point how know (for instance, the first ...


0

GPGme is indeed the official API for GPG and is easy to use and well documented (the examples in tests/gpg are very helpful) Here is an example to encrypt for John Smith: gpgme_data_t clear_text, encrypted_text; gpgme_key_t recipients[2] = {NULL, NULL}; /* The array must be NULL-terminated */ ... error = gpgme_op_keylist_start(context, "John ...


0

What if the union is pointed by structure pointer?


0

You can find some basic info on arrays: http://golang.org/doc/effective_go.html#arrays package main import ( "fmt" ) var s [10]MyStruct //initializes to 0 func main() { for k, v := range s { fmt.Println(k, v.a) } } type MyStruct struct { a int64 }


1

I have tried this code in my machine (Ubuntu 12.0.4). But I didn't get any error messages like you got. According to the man page of open() you may probably missing #include http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/open.2.html Try again friend you will find the answer


0

// define structure type type my_struct struct { a int b rune } // declare slice of my_struct var a []my_struct // declare and initialise struct with one element b := make([]my_struct, 1) // create structure and save it b[0] = my_struct{1, 'a'} // append a new one b = append(b, my_struct{2, 'b'}) You definitely have to read ...


0

this is the essential part of the code #include <stdio.h> #include <cv.h> #include <highgui.h> #include<math.h> int nombredelettres(int x,int y) {-------------------- } int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { IplImage* img = 0; int height,width,step,channels,L,ss,b,delta,r,q,o,m1,r1,wi,f,tab[9999]; uchar *data; int i,j,k; ...


0

The work for each row in the matrix requires all the previous rows to be finished, so you can't divide up the work that way. However, within a single row, each column can be processed in parallel (with the caveat that original value of the k-th column must be saved and used in the calculation of the other columns). This corresponds to your j values. I ...


0

You are trying to use named pipe as some kind of buffer - client connects to it, puts some data, then disconnects, after that other client connects and retrieves this data. This is invalid approach, named pipe is just that - a pipe, it has two sides - server side and client side, server and client could communicate through it. Usual pipe usage scenario: ...


-1

Use CreateNamedPipe instead. Following code is taken from this ms sample. HANDLE hPipe = CreateNamedPipe( lpszPipename, // pipe name PIPE_ACCESS_DUPLEX | // read/write access FILE_FLAG_OVERLAPPED, // overlapped mode PIPE_TYPE_MESSAGE | // message-type pipe PIPE_READMODE_MESSAGE | // ...


0

You should try making you SPI handler ISR driven to keep you from constantly polling, can also help the debugging since you'll only get notifications when the SPI is actually transacting. NOTE: I'm bringing this from my FreeRTOS impl, so my ISR definition is not XC32 exactly... /* Open SPI */ SPI1CON = 0; spi_flags = SPICON_MODE32 | SPICON_ON; ...


0

If you need to change the malloc for only some modules, or even part of modules, I would suggest to use a simple #define. This allows to restrict the use of the new malloc to some parts of the same module: ... #define malloc(x) MyMalloc(x) ... //From here on will be used the new malloc MyMalloc #undef malloc ... //From here on will be used the ...


3

Because the C language grammar says that an initializer must be an assignment-expression. The latter includes all expressions except those formed from two other expressions and the comma operator: expression : assignment-expression expression , assignment-expression So 0,1,2 is not a valid initializer for i. Since 1 is not a valid declarator ...


0

You can refer to this question. C: void cvSet2D(CvArr* arr, int idx0, int idx1, CvScalar value) The arguments are: arr - Input array (i.e. the image) idx0 โ€“ The first zero-based component of the element index (i.e. row) idx1 โ€“ The second zero-based component of the element index (i.e column) value โ€“ The assigned value To know what cvScalar is, ...


0

Try linking in two steps. First stage: ld -r -o libwrapped.a --wrap=malloc myobj1.o myobj2.o -lsomelib Second stage: ld -o final -lwrapped -lsomeotherlib The -r option makes the first file (wrapped) relocatable, often called partial linking. Basically you make a library of all the objects you want wrapped, then link that with the ones you don't want ...


0

You can call the function like this: combinedcrc = calc_crc(buf1, 11); // 11 being the sum of the lengths of buf1 and buf2 But this requires that: buf2 is declared directly after buf1 like in your question your compiler puts buf1 and buf2 directly one after the other in memory without any padding. This is often the case, but the compiler may very well ...


2

That code has two distinct paths through the function: one that corresponds to arg > 0 being true and the other corresponding to it being false. The number of return statements involved does not affect that, since it does not change the number of distinct paths through the function. Your code could be rewritten as int foo(int arg) { int retval = ...


0

This solution is resembles one of the previous, but is more functional. It implies that the machine use little endian format: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdint.h> typedef struct //pseudo structure describing the header and the data { int_16 key; //first 4 bytes as device key unsigned char length; //length of ...


1

Your cyclomatic complexity would be 2, here's why: Your code is essentially this: int foo(int arg) { int out; if (arg > 0) out = 1; else out = 0; return out; } plain return statement dont count toward complexity. You only have 1 if statement, no if else statements. Hence, your cyclomatic ...


1

concatenate the buffers first, and then call your function once this is stupid, but the only way to do literally what you asked just call the function twice, like char crc = calc_crc(buf1, len1) ^ calc_crc(buf2, len2); this ignores your requirement that I want to call my crc function once but you never explained why, and it seems like a daft ...


0

Consider that prototype: void eeprom_writeWord(unsigned int addresOfMyEEpromVariable, unsigned int value) The attribute probably doesn't do anything here, left out for readability. What you do ist not taking the address (which would be of type unsigned int *) but the value itself (a plain unsigned int, that's not magically a pointer just by calling it ...


0

Use an initializer parameter: static char calc_crc(char init, unsigned char *data, unsigned len) { for ( int i = 0 ; i < len; i++ ) init = init ^ data[i]; return init; } Then you can do result=calc_crc(calc_crc(0,buffer1,buffer1len), buffer2, buffer2len);


0

My first contribution here on StackOverflow, hope u'll enjoy my help. The answer above is good enough, but I'd like to input the way I'd do it. This will make it easy for you to keep track of the different parts in the header, and to separate the header from the data. Cons is that you need less comments, easier to debug and so on. #include <stdio.h> ...


1

Example code to create a filename string with millisecond timestamp: get_time_in_ms.c #include<stdio.h> #include<math.h> #include<stdio.h> #include<time.h> void get_time_in_ms() { long ms; time_t time; struct timespec spec; char filename[14]; clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &spec); time = ...


0

This has several solutions on github, eg in Ruby, equivalent to your n is citePages and being the h-index calculated function h_index(){ var hArray = new Array(); var x = 0; for(var i = 0; i < citePages.length; i++){ var citeArray = citePages[i]; for(var j = 0; j < citeArray.length; j++){ ...


0

I'd add CImg to the list of options. While it is an image library the API is not so high level as most (devil/imagemagick/freeimage/GIL). It is also header only. The image class has simple width height and data members with public access. Under the hood it uses libpng (if you tell it to with preprocessor directive). The data is cast to whatever type you ...


0

I think you need something like this. int y = 1; // initialize with 1 printf(" Year Interest Sum\n"); printf("--------+--------+--------\n"); do { i = (sum * interest)/100; // it will calculate sum+interest for 1 year. sum += i; y++; printf("%5d %11.2f %5.2f\n", y, i, sum); } while (y <= year); // you can compare y > 0 ...


0

Like the PLS_INTEGER mentioned previously, the BINARY_FLOAT and BINARY_DOUBLE types in Oracle 10g use machine arithmetic and require less storage space, both of which make them more efficient than the NUMBER type http://www.dba-oracle.com/plsql/t_plsql_binary_float.htm


3

Linux has clock_gettime() with nanosecond resolution. Example code #include <stdio.h> #include <time.h> int main(void) { unsigned mult = 0; struct timespec t0, t1; clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &t0); for (unsigned k = 0; k < 10000000; k++) mult *= k; // no overflow! clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &t1); ...


0

your do while() loop only runs once, since one of the conditions is "y == 1" which will evaluate to false after you increment y, thus the loops stops. You also don increment y anywhere and since it's initialized to 0 it also doesn't satisfy the condition.


2

do { i = sum * interest/100; sum += i; } while (y == 1 && y<= year); In this loop value of y does not change therefore 2nd time condition is false as y is initialized as 0.Thus values of sum remains same as it was after 1st iteration. increment y in this loop and change condition to while ( y<year);// y<year because y is ...


0

Use date --rfc-3339='ns' command to see the o/p in nanoseconds precision. You can try looking "man date" command for finer details. As you can see, following is the o/p I get with this command: [user1@mach]# date --rfc-3339='ns' 2015-07-29 03:34:09.077024060-07:00


0

Ok, so thanks to CristiFati i found the problem. The function getaddrinfo("localhost", portStr, NULL, &ainfo) used that way was returning an IPv6 address. While accept was getting sockaddr_in, which is a struct for IPv4 address. It could be probably solved more ways, for example using sockaddr_in6 for IPv6 communication telling getaddrinfo to to ...


1

You are just invoking undefined behaviour by using a never initialized value. In construct_generic_attribute, you initialize current and previous value and then call set_ga_running_value. In the latter, you use current and previous values that have just been initialize to compute delta : fine until here. But then you have : ga_ptr->running_value = ...


0

Render unto free(.) everything malloc(.) rendered unto thee. That is, you must call free(.) on anything you got from malloc(.). Your code fails to free(.) the pointer returned by the first malloc(.) Code like this: int * my_array = get_filled_array(); //All code using `my_arrray` must in or called from this section... free(my_array); Consider ...



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