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0

let us use the pointer completely in your functions because the array without a bracket is the pointer of the first element of that array see your functions now all pointers :) /*finds the largest value in an array*/ #include <stdio.h> int find_large(int *ar, int size, int *ptr1); int main(void) { int array[10] = {1, 33, 4, 85, 132, -9, 0, 12, ...


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Your problem is that you are storing name and type as chars, not char[]s. You can either allocate memory for them at runtime or declare them as arrays of fixed size. My code will use the latter. Change the struct to something like this: struct File { char type[12]; /*or whatever maximum sizes you think are appropriate */ char name[64]; int ...


0

You have: $(MAKE) -C $(src) SUBDIR-$(PWD) modules But it seems like you want: $(MAKE) -C $(src)/SUBDIR-$(PWD) modules Or something along those lines; where does the source code live? You need to -C there.


3

Your structure contains space for exactly 1 character type and 1 character name. Both of those are likely to be longer than a single character - in fact, they must, since they're presumably supposed to be null-terminated strings. Try making those into arrays instead...


1

The main idea in changing the size of an image, is to know that most image files, consist of a header that specifies how the file have to be readed (width, height, amount of bytes per pixels, etc) and the other part is just a 2d array made of pixels. So if you want to resize an image, you need to think in adding or substracting pixels. For example if you ...


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try this if you want pointer arguments as an array and pointer arguments as pointer i added the return value removing the word largest in your function():) /*finds the largest value in an array*/ #include <stdio.h> int find_large(int *ar, int size, int *ptr1); int main(void) { int array[10] = {1, 33, 4, 85, 132, -9, 0, 12, 99, 133}; int ...


1

// Get characters of file int numChars = 0; while(fgetc(file) != EOF) numChars++; // Allocate memory for shader string char * shaderString = malloc(numChars * sizeof(char) +1 ); // +1 for '\0' // Rewind file to read in string rewind(file); // if no pTemp, u can't find the start of your string char* pTemp = ...


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One options is to guess the maximum size of the strings in the array, and use: char arr[][SIZE] = {"foo", "bar"}; where SIZE is to be replaced by a number. char arr[][4] = {"foo", "bar"}; would work given the strings but it won't if you use: char arr[][4] = {"foo", "fubar"}; When such a line is compiled, gcc prints the following warning: ...


3

Assuming you have C99 features at your disposal, compound literals do the trick: char *arr[] = { (char[]){"foo"}, (char[]){"bar"} };


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This issue seldom gets the attention it deserves. As Floris observes, only the bytes of the representation get sent. C and C++ define the bitwise representation* of unsigned numbers, but not signed ones, so sending signed numbers as bytes opens a compatibility gap. It's easy to "fix" the format for transmission. Casting a signed int to its corresponding ...


0

Have each thread place an advisory write-lock the file that's it's about to access using, for example, flock().


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#include <stdio.h> void find_large(int *ar, int size, int *ptr1); int main(void) { int array[10] = {1, 33, 4, 85, 132, -9, 0, 12, 99, 133}; int size = sizeof(array) / sizeof(*array); int largest = 0; //int *ptr1 = &largest;//Not required find_large(array, size, &largest); printf("The largest element is %d.\n", ...


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You're not using ptr1 inside the function find_large, so the largest element is never returned. Also note that you need to say ptr1 instead of &ptr1.


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Because the standard does not mandate a particular representation for signed types: 3.9.1 Fundamental types [basic.fundamental] Paragraph 7 of n3936 Types bool, char, char16_t, char32_t, wchar_t, and the signed and unsigned integer types are collectively called integral types. A synonym for integral type is integer type. The representations of integral ...


1

Answering my own question here. The only feasible meaning of insn seems to be instruction. Thanks for the link, Jeff.


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MrAlias & user both make good points, so why not combine them? typedef union __attribute__((__packed__)) { int x : 24; char s[3]; } u3b; typedef union __attribute__((__packed__)) { long long x : 56; char s[7]; } u7b; For large amounts of data you may save some memory this way but the code will almost definitely be slower due to the unaligned ...


1

When you send a number over a socket, it's just bytes. Now if you want to send a negative number, and the representation of negative numbers is different at the receiving end, then you might have a problem. Otherwise, it's just bytes. So if there is a chance that the binary representation of the negative number would be misunderstood at the receiving end, ...


0

If you have a C99 or C11 compiler available, then you can pass both dimensions of the array as arguments before the array parameter, as shown in ThoAppelsin's answer. If you are stuck with a C89 compiler, then you have to work harder — much harder. By far the simplest solution is to make the #define dimensions available in the header; then you can ...


2

change to void addAnimal( struct animal unique[], int *count, char* newspecies, char* newbreed){ int i, k = *count; for( i = 0; i < k; i++){ if( strcmp(unique[i].species, newspecies)==0 && strcmp(unique[i].breed, newbreed)==0 ){ printf("both match\n"); return ; } } //added only once (Rather than ...


0

Unless you are using MS Visual Studio 2013 Express as I do, as well as have a C99 standard compliant compiler in your hands, you can do the following: int function( int height, int width, int (*grid)[height][width] ); All you need is the variable-length arrays (VLA) functionality, which the semi-compliant MSVC lacks. Here's an example usage of it: ...


0

I'm a software engineer at Microsoft so I think I could give you some insights on this. From a testing perspective, you should definitely have a Windows machine to test against. You can install Windows 8 as a VM using Virtual Box or something similar. You could also remote into a Windows machine if you have access to one. Visual Studio can't be installed ...


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Define the function the following way void addAnimal( struct animal unique[], int *count, const char *newspecies, const char *newbreed); void addAnimal( struct animal unique[], int *count, const char *newspecies, const char *newbreed) { int i = 0; while ( i < *count && ( strcmp( unique[i].species, newspecies ) || strcmp( ...


1

The ReadProcessMemory() call can only be invoked from a process running on the same machine as the process to which the HANDLE belongs. The server can pass the HANDLE to what it believes is the remote client, however the actual receiver could be a proxy process that is running on the same machine as the server. The client then instructs the proxy what ...


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Your 802.1X header says the packet is 227 bytes. You have 199 bytes highlighted and 28 bytes not highlighted, so that sums up to 227. Good. So if your entire packet is 227 bytes, your EAP header certainly must be less than that. Except your EAP header says that the EAP data is 227 bytes, too. Your EAP header should look like: ...


4

In C, you may do: int compareFirstWord(const char* sentence, const char* compareWord) { while (*compareWord != '\0' && *sentence == *compareWord) { ++sentence; ++compareWord; } if (*compareWord == '\0' && (*sentence == '\0' || *sentence == ' ')) { return 0; } return *sentence < *compareWord ? -1 ...


1

HANDLE is a value. Its meaning is only useful to the local system and processes. You pass the HANDLE as argument to Windows APIs to interact with the corresponding process/window/etc, therefore it's not really useful to remote systems for anything besides identification. Yes, you can take a snapshot of a memory region and send it over socket. In fact, you ...


1

You're correct that you are currently adding an extra newline character every time you find one. Instead, you need a way to identify only the 7th line. It sounds to me like you can count the newlines, then only do the extra newline placement after the seventh one. Maybe add another integer to the top of your main function: int newline_count = 0; Increment ...


0

temp is an uninitialized variable. It looks like you are attempting to extract the first word out of the sentence in your loop. In order to do it this way, you would first have to initialize temp to be at least as long as your sentence. Also, your sentence may not have a space in it. (What about period, \t, \r, \n? Do these matter?) In addition, you ...


0

The -> operator is for selecting a field from a struct via a pointer to that struct. hashtable[r] is a struct, not a pointer to one. You use the ordinary . operator to select a member, just as if you were operating on a scalar struct word (which you are): if (hashtable[r].name == NULL) { ...


0

The type of hashtable[r] is struct word. The type of &hashtable[r] is struct word*. That explains why you should not use &hashtable[r] as an argument to treecreation. What you need to pass to treecreation depends on what you are doing with the argument w1 in the function. If you are allocating memory and assigning to *w1, then, you need to use: ...


3

Your program is not compiling beause your variable hashtable has the wrong type. You want to store s in it. s is a pointer to word. Therefore, you hashtable has to be an array of pointers to word: struct word *hashtable[100]; Now, when you call treecreate you just need to pass the word: treecreation(hashtable,s);


0

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two%27s_complement I want to find the signed value of a number in C. So if I have a number let's say 10, in binary (in 8 bits) it would be 0000 0110. How do I get the signed number in two's complement 1111 1110, which is -2. You're confused. The 8-bit two's complement of 0000 0110 is 1111 1010 (-10 if interpreted as ...


1

Two possibilities that come to mind are (1) always put some symbol in the library, even if it is a zero-length object. (2) provide wrappers in the Makefile environment to ranlib/ar that filter the warnings out. The other user/automated build don't need to explicitly use grep -v, it can be in a command you provide and substitute, eg: AR = ...


0

If we already have the binary representation of a positive number n, then the bitwise representation of -n is ~n+1, in other words, 1 plus the bitwise negation of the positive number.


0

You are missing a ; after int val.


0

Try issuing a fflush(stdout) immediately before the printf("\n%d characters\n", count); FYI: your origninal code executes as expected on Ubuntu 14.04 Linux.


0

Your only option in this case is to reallocate the char*'s memory so that you can get a larger string. First, you will need the length of the original string, then you must add 1 to it as the strlen function does not include the null terminator: char* thingy = "test"; char* another = "hello world"; int len = strlen(thingy); char* thingy = realloc(thingy, ...


0

thingy is a pointer (*) to char, i.e., the address of the first character of the string "test". Arithmetic on thingy changes the address to which it points: thingy += another[6]; This adds the integer value of the char at the address another + 6 to the address pointed to by thingy. This is beyond the end of the string "test" and thus undefined behaviour - ...


2

There's no string arithmetic in C, so you can't do it that way. However, there's strcat(), which you can use (as long as there's room for those characters): char thingy[256] = "Hello World"; strcat(thingy, "!"); // thingy is now "Hello World!" Although it's important to note that you should always check string lengths and be careful when doing such ...


0

The string you append onto should not be a literal. If you had: char thingy[10] = "test"; You can: int len = strlen(thingy); thingy[len] = another[6]; thingy[len+1] = '\0';


0

If you are sure seasonHold is null-terminated (it will be here), you can use a pointer and while loop to accomplish what you want: char *ptr = seasonHold; n = 0; while (*ptr++) { /* same as saying while (*ptr++ != '\0') */ seasonHold2[n] = seasonHold[n]; /* could also do: seasonHold2[n] = *ptr; */ n++; } seasonHold2[n] = 0; ...


-1

Try using an int. If that does not work, then remove the other char * and just pass value with either as int or long and see if it makes a difference. I'd stick to integers when dealing with cross systems or strings and then convert numbers into long. That has no basis from my research. I was simply remembering long long rather that int versus long. In AIX, ...


2

Enums are like constant integers. Here: summer=0, winter=1,... seansonhold is a char*. By dereferencing it you get a char. This char will then be converted to a 'season' type because char->int does not give compiler errors. So you basically test here if the first byte of your char array is equal to 0,1,2..


5

They are initialized to zero. From the C99 standard, §6.7.8, item 19: The initialization shall occur in initializer list order, each initializer provided for a particular subobject overriding anypreviously listed initializer for the same subobject; all subobjects that are not initialized explicitly shall be initialized implicitly the same as objects ...


0

The solution from David Wohlferd above works. I'm just framing it in the context which solved my problem. To make Visual Studio pre-process this file which contains C preprocessor directives and valid assembly in Intel syntax (which is converted to AT&T syntax with a switch), make a pre-build event. Put "cl /EP topsecret.preasm > topsecret.asm" in that ...


1

I have the same problem, udp socket does not receive scapy packet. I suppose there might be something related to this post: Raw Socket Help: Why UDP packets created by raw sockets are not being recieved by kernel UDP? And what works for me is the socket.IP_HDRINCL option. Here is the working code for both and sender. sender: import socket from scapy.all ...


0

This is the Dutch national flag problem with a simple linear solution described by E. W. Dijkstra in the early 70's. It's sometimes used as a partitioning method for quicksort. #include <iostream> template <typename BidIt, typename T> void dnf_partition(BidIt first, BidIt last, const T &pivot) { for (BidIt next = first; next != last;) ...


0

GetAdapterAddresses() provides subnet masks only on Vista and later. When looping through the unicast addresses pointed to by the FirstUnicastAddress field of the IP_ADAPTER_ADDRESSES record, the IP_ADAPTER_UNICAST_ADDRESS record includes an OnLinkPrefixLength field. This field is not available on pre-Vista systems. This field is the length of the subnet ...


1

The problem is :- For min player you should have if (currentMoveScore < bestScore) but the code is evaluating max instead of min.


0

Your problem appears a bit different than you suppose. That the program stops after trying to retrieve a sequence that is not present in the data file is a consequence of the fact that it never rewinds the input. Therefore, even for a query list containing only sequences that are present in the data file, if the requested sequence IDs are not in the same ...



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