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0

suggest the following code which compiles with no errors/warnings is complete (given the posted code) eliminates a lot of the code clutter eliminates the 'magic' numbers buried in the code #include<stdio.h> #include<stdlib.h> #define MAX_NUM_FILMS (51) #define MAX_FILM_TITLE_LEN (51) int main() { int i=0; char FilmArray[ MAX_NUM_FILMS ...


0

There is a conflict of requirements: barrier semantics require all threads to be in to continue, and shutdown requires termination when threads are shared between execution blocks (could be inside different barriers). I suggest to replace barrier with a custom implementation that would support extern cancel call. Example (may not run, but the idea...): ...


0

Perhaps having two flags and using something like the following would work (with appropriate mutexes, etc.): for (;;) { pthread_barrier_wait(&g_stage_one_barrier); + | UpdateThisThreadsStateVariables(); | ...


0

given the problems with the scanf() given the probability of a buffer overflow/undefined behaviours, etc I suggest using: #include <stdio.h> #define MAX_LEN (11) // define the struct struct Name {char d[MAX_LEN]}; // declare instance of the struct struct Name myName; int main () { // remember: char *fgets(char *str, int n, FILE *stream) ...


0

Your code is essentially trying to do an integer to pointer conversion passing char to parameter of type char *. Try using & with strcpy : strcpy(&FilmArray[i], array); & designates the use of a pointer for FilmArray[i]


-1

char FilmArray[51] is an array of 51 characters, not 51 strings, which is what you want. Change it to static const size_t nofFilms = 51 char* filmNames[ nofFilms ]; // though ideally you'd want a dynamically-resizing array in case you want more than 51 ... { static const size_t filmNameLength = 255; char* filmName = calloc( filmNameLength, sizeof(char) ...


3

FilmArray is an array of characters, not an array of strings. So when you're doing strcpy(FilmArray[i], array); the compiler will convert the value in FilmArray[i] to a pointer and use that as the destination of the string. This will lead to undefined behavior. In fact, the compiler should be shouting a warning at you for this, and if it doesn't then ...


0

The threads that are waiting at the barriers are not the issue, it's the threads that are still running UpdateThis... or DoComputations... that will delay the shutdown. You can reduce the shutdown time by periodically checking for shutdown inside the UpdateThis... and DoComputations... functions. Here's the outline of one possible solution main ...


6

If you really want to pass an array, then pass it by reference (or const reference if you don't intend to change it) via a template, like template<std::size_t N> void listElements(/*const*/ char (&arr)[N]) { // sizeof(arr) will be equal to N // rest of the function body here } If you pass it by value, then it decays to a pointer, i.e. ...


3

char x[] = "Hello"; cout << sizeof(x) << endl; // 6 because the compiler knows x is an array of 6 characters long void listElements(char arr[]){ cout << "Size of arr: " << sizeof(arr) << endl; // 4 arr[] is actually a pointer Calling listElement() is doesn't actually pass the entire array, it only passes the pointer to ...


1

You are getting the size of a 32bit pointer to a null terminated char[]. Effectively, a char*


5

char[] as a function argument is the same as char* in C++. And apparently on your system, sizeof(char*) == 4. Also, sizeof(char) always equals 1. To properly pass the C-style string, pass its length as extra integer argument or, even better, use std::string instead of char[] and char*. Code examples: void listElements(char *arr, int length){ for (int ...


0

1) Convert both strings to lowercase as necessary (use tolower from ctype.h). 2) Sort each string, e.g., by using qsort from stdlib.h: static int cmp(const void *a, const void *b) { return *(char *)a - *(char *)b; } qsort(str1, strlen(str1), 1, (cmp)); qsort(str2, strlen(str2), 1, (cmp)); 3) Compare the sorted strings with strcmp from string.h - if ...


0

Upon viewing your gist I noticed a discrepancy from your screenshot: HEADER_SEARCH_PATHS = /Users/thomas/SourceTree/SUbD/SUbD/../ThirdParty/include/ruby/mac /Users/thomas/SourceTree/SUbD/SUbD/../ThirdParty/include/ruby/mac/universal-darwin12.5.0 This should be: HEADER_SEARCH_PATHS = ...


1

Short answer is no because the frame buffer on modern operating systems is setup as determined by the vbios and kernel driver(s). It depends on amount of VRAM present on the board, the size of the GART, physical Ram present and a whole bunch of other stuff (VRAM reservation, whether it should be visible to CPU or not, etc). On top of this, modern OS's are ...


2

while ((n /= 10) > 0) You should be dividing by base. 10 will work like a charm just as long as you ask it to print in decimal. I guess the moral of the story here is that if you have a bug in some code that contains a nontrivial constant, that is probably a good place to start investigating.


2

The paths searched to satisfy an #include directive and the order in which they are searched are implementation defined. That includes whether any user-specified include paths (if even supported) are searched before, after, or instead of any default paths. That's the case for both forms of #include directive. In particular, although it is common for ...


1

It sounds like you're new to C! Welcome :) Tasks like that can seem complex, so the first step I'd do here is break it down into steps that you can google for how to do. So: "count how many of the first letter of one word there is, then compare to the other, then repeat for the rest of the letter" Read in the words/create variables of them Create an ...


0

Convert both strings to lowercase characters. Create two arrays of 26 characters for the letters of the alphabet. Run through each string counting the letters and incrementing the appropriate element in the alphabet arrays. Then compare the two alphabet arrays and if they are equal for each character, your strings are anagrams.


0

When initialize struct in C it is a good idea to crate a function to do the initialization. I useally use a name line init_"name of struct". For you case a simple strncpy will init your string field. I use strncpy to avoid writing off the end of the string. Tip use a #define for setting the lengths of all you strings. Latter on when string lengths ...


0

The function clock() returns elapsed CPU time, which includes ticks from all cores. Since there is some overhead to using multiple threads, when you sum the execution time of all threads the total cpu time will always be longer than the serial time. If you want the real time (wall clock time), try to use the OMP Runtime Library function omp_get_wtime() ...


1

If the same code has to handle both data files, then you're stuck with reading the fields into a string, and subsequently converting the string into a number. It is not clear from your description whether you need to do something special at the end of line or not — but because only one of the data lines ends with a comma, you do have to allow for fields to ...


1

I think an example is better than giving you hints, this is a combination of fgets() + strtok(), there are other functions that could work for example strchr(), though it's easier this way and since I just wanted to point you in the right direction, well I did it like this #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include <stdlib.h> int ...


6

Compiling it with: $ gcc -O3 -std=c99 -Wall -lm test.c test.c:59:9: warning: ‘total_count’ is used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized] int total_count, c_count = 0; (and a couple of another harmless warnings about unused code) That is, you have total_count uninitialized, just set it to 0 and it will work as expected: int ...


0

You can do it like this: #include <stdio.h> struct Name {char d[11];}; int main (){ char str[11] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11}; scanf("%s",str); // The below is C99 style. struct Name new = { .d = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11}}; struct Name new2 = { .d = "hi mum"}; // Memcpy does the job as well memcpy(new.d, str, ...


1

For two processes (running on the same machine) to communicate via POSIX message queues, each one opens the queue (where "the" queue is identified by a mutually-agreed name provided to mq_open()). Any message posted to the queue can be retrieved by any process that has it open, by calling mq_receive(). Messages are received in priority order, and ...


2

There are couple of ways: int main () { char str[11]; scanf("%10s",str); // Make sure you don't read more than // what the array can hold. struct Name name1 = {"name"}; // This works only if you use string literal. struct Name name2; strcpy(name2.d, str); // Use this when you want to copy from another variable. }


-1

You should be able to add a \n into your scan string. fscanf(arq_file, "%i %lf\n", &myStruct[i+1].Field1, &myStruct[i+1].Field2); that will scan for a newline.


2

Supposing that the guard macro INC_FX_COMM_H indicates that the code following is in file flexsea_comm.h, note that that header is included by flexsea.h, above the point where the COMM_STR_BUF_LEN macro is defined. As a result, flexsea_comm.h will always be processed before that macro is defined unless it is #included separately, before flexsea.h. The same ...


0

Consider these three files. First, jump.c: #include <stdio.h> int jump(const double height) { fflush(stdout); fprintf(stderr, "Jumping %.3g meters.\n", height); fflush(stderr); return 0; } Second, sit.c: #include <stdio.h> int sit(void) { fflush(stdout); fprintf(stderr, "Sitting down.\n"); fflush(stderr); ...


1

It's easier to see what's going on if you print a message from the child when the child is created. #include <stdio.h> #include <unistd.h> int main( void ) { pid_t pid; for ( int i = 0; i < 3; i++ ) { pid = fork(); if (pid > 0) sleep(1); // give the child time to print its message else ...


0

Do you know which files I would use in C++? Like where would I find them? I've looked everywhere, but can't seem to find them. I'm new to Octave and C++, but I'd really like to figure this out because I know Octave has a lot of useful mathematical functions. I'm interested in DSP and I'd like to be able to use features from Octave in C++. There's really not ...


1

You can check out swig. I use it myself and can confirm that it works quite well. Check out the tutorial for a python example.


4

There is no overloaded version of pow() in C++ which satisfies your calling signature of (int, int). One of the supported calling conventions is (double, int) so modifying your call to: pow(10.0, ...) should be enough


0

According to https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dt5dakze.aspx there are many pow() variants. You're calling pow() with type casting, but the compiler has few functions matching and gets confused. Change the definition of get_scale() to be more specific about types, so the compiler can select proper pow() version unambiguously.


0

in c++ the pow function has the following signature double pow (double base, double exponent); so if you made you call something like #define get_scale( i ) ((short)pow( 10.0, (double)cat_names[ i ]))) but that is using a macro, and i'm not too comfortable with those. i would create a function short get_scale(int i){return (short)pow( 10.0, ...


0

Since each thread is writing to a global variable, you don't need to do anything further. After the main thread has executed pthread_join(myThread1, NULL), thread 1 has executed its assignment at the address &c0, so by the time the Answer function is executed, c0 contains the result from thread 1. When breaking your problem down into threads, take care ...


4

You are correct, 7 processes are forked (plus there's the original parent process, for a grand total of 8). The key concept is that forked processes are initially (near-)exact duplicates of their parents, so in particular, they have the same variable values, and start executing by returning from the fork() call. This table maps out the forks that will ...


2

Here is a version that allocates memory dynamically on the heap. It works like the main() argument *argv[] namely an array of arrays (although in that case the row lengths might be different). In this answer, you don't need to pass the array sizes for fld() to work: but to tell it when to stop! The reason is, it's a 1-D array of array pointers, each of which ...


1

Yes, you just have to declare array as char** and dynamically allocate as you read each line. E.g. int MAX_NUM_LINES = 1000; int MAX_LINE_LEN = 256; char** array; malloc(array, MAX_NUM_LINES*sizeof(char*)); fp = fopen(...); int line_ct = 0; char line[MAX_LINE_LEN]; while ( fgets(line, MAX_LINE_LEN, fp) != NULL ) { int len = strlen(line); ...


0

#include <string.h> #include <locale.h> #include <intrin.h> #include <stdio.h> // Prototipos int LeeIDFabricante (char * CadFabricante); //void LeeIDModelo (char * CadenaModelo); int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { char CadFabricante[0x20]; char CadenaModelo[0x40]; int Resultado; setlocale( LC_ALL, "Spanish" ); ...


0

This is an example of a possible approach #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> int main() { char array[100][100]; char line[100]; size_t arraySize; size_t count; FILE *file; const char *filepath; filepath = "<put the file path here>"; file = fopen(filepath, "r"); if ...


3

They should interact with the various "programming primitives" that the native code implements. That is, the native code should only do enough to allow the scripts to function within the game (although "function" can sometimes mean speed-wise). If that sounds cyclical... it is. There's no complete way to define at the beginning of development what ...


1

Based on the comments, I think this is what you actually want #include <stdio.h> #define STRING_MAX 10 int main (void) { char string[STRING_MAX]; unsigned int count; unsigned int total; int chr; do { count = 0; total = 0; while (((chr = getchar()) != EOF) && (chr != '\n')) ...


1

Code is failing as scanf("%s", temp_input); does not prevent excessive long input from overfilling temp_input resulting in undefined behavior (UB) fgets() alternative: char buf[STRING_MAX]; while (fgets(buf, sizeof buf, stdin) != NULL) { // if input does not end with \n, assume additional char for this line. if (strchr(buf, '\n') == NULL) { int ch; ...


3

A "real" operating system will not use the framebuffer at address 0xA0000, so you can't draw on the screen by writing to it directly. Instead your OS probably has proper video drivers that will talk to the hardware in various very involved ways. In short there's no easy way to do what you want to do on a modern OS. On the other hand, if you want to learn ...


0

Use getchar() to read from stdin. It gets one char at a time so you can break if string is to long. Maybe you want somting like #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #define STRING_MAX 100 int main() { //Declaration of variables char temp_input[STRING_MAX]; int ch; // char just read int ins; // ...


0

This code won't send anything. Is it the real code? You're looping while (feof(f1)), should be while (!feof(f1)). You're breaking out of your send loop if bytesRead isn't -1. You need an else before testing it for -1.


-1

You're causing a buffer overflow, don't use scanf for this purpose.


0

In the first answer suggested by Anirudth... Just apply the HoughCirles function after thresholding function (2nd step). Then you can directly draw the circles around the pupil and using radius(r) and center of eye(x,y) you can easily find out the Center of Eye..



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