New answers tagged

2

The thing that you are asking about is called "Dialog." While you could certainly write something lower level using ncurses, Dialog is available in Linux pretty much universally. You can read some basic documentation for it here. Choosing to use this over a curses based approach allows you to focus on what it is you're actually looking to do rather than ...


1

The coordinates you use do not span a equilateral triangle. Equilateral triangles always have three sides with the same length. In your example, the bottom side has a length of 0.9, but the other two have a length of sqrt(0.45^2 + 1.0^2) = 1.097. Even when assuming that you took 0.45 instead of 0.5, this is still not equilateral. (Bottom = 1.0, Other sides = ...


2

Have you disassembled the build to make sure that it is? Try the restrict keyword along with const to ensure that the compiler knows that nothing else can change it; you're calling another function f2() the compiler cannot know whether there is another pointer to the same block of memory being used in f2. But only do so as long as nothing in this branch does ...


2

There is no reason for the compiler to assume that function f2 may not modify what p is pointing to. The fact that p is defined as const char *p only tells the compiler that p cannot be used to modify the data it points to, not that the data itself is constant. If you know the array is indeed not modified by function f2(), you can modify the code to not ...


0

In the for loop, you use sumconduc uninitialized: sumconduc = conduc + sumconduc; You should initialize it to 0. The same holds for sumtemp, sumtempsqrd, and sumtemptconduc. Compiling with warnings enabled such as by gcc -Wall -Wextra would have diagnosed such silly mistakes.


0

I agree it's pretty neat, but it's not an HTTP server - it doesn't understand anything about HTTP, especially not how to parse a query string. You can certainly use 0MQ to send messages very simply. The zguide has examples of many patterns in many languages - should be everything you need. You need to write both a client and server (really a sender and a ...


0

You could solve this without the need of saving characters inside a multidimensional array by reading the content of the file line by line. Below is a possible implementation: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> int file_format(int lines, int value) { if(lines == 4 && value == 1) return 1; ...


1

Your code is almost correct, the formula to compute ptr[index] is incorrect: you must compute byte offsets from ptr cast as a byte pointer. Here is a better version: Type **Create2D(size_t rows, size_t cols) { Type **ptr = (Type **)SafeMalloc(rows * sizeof(Type*) + rows * cols * sizeof(Type)); // rows*sizeof(Type*) is total memory needed for the ...


1

#include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> int main(void) { char * someString = "This is a\r string\r\nTTTT"; if(strstr(someString, "\r\n") != NULL) { puts("We hit \\r\\n"); } if(strstr(someString, "\n") != NULL) { puts("We hit \\n"); } return 0; }


0

To "unlink" a node is simply to change the next domain of the node that was pointing to it. You can of course keep the pointer of the unlinked node, and use this node later. Unlinking is not the same as releasing the memory allocated to the node. For example, the following function unlinks the first node and returns it: Courses * GetFirstCourse(Student * ...


2

The sequence number will have a random value, but it is completely normal behavior for the acknowledgement (which you ask about) number field to contain 32 bits of zeroes in it. This isn't to say that it can't contain data. You rightly distinguish the ACK flag from the acknowledgement number. The actual meaning of the flag is to signal that the value in ...


0

For starters I would use fgets to read into a six-character buffer. That makes it very easy to see if a line is longer than four characters or not, because if the line is longer then the fifth character (element at index 4) will not be a newline. Be careful with the last line though as then the fifth element might be the terminator if there's no ending ...


0

You can now find most of the fiddles at https://fiddles.io/


1

In your program, you have a pipe. The parent reads from one head of the pipe, and therefore he waits till someone writes on the other head of the pipe. The child writes, so even if parent was to execute first, he would wait for child to write. Change this: read(fd[0], buffer, BUFSIZE); printf("parent\n"); to printf("parent\n"); read(fd[0], buffer, ...


0

About delayed ACK timing, RFC 1122 says: A TCP SHOULD implement a delayed ACK, but an ACK should not be excessively delayed; in particular, the delay MUST be less than 0.5 seconds, and in a stream of full-sized segments there SHOULD be an ACK for at least every second segment. So it depend on implementation and of course if could ...


0

Are you sure the strings are always null terminated. Try some belt and braces... char *detab(char *string) { int s_len= strlen(string) + 1; for (int i = 0; string[i] != '\0'; i++) { if (string[i] == '\t') { string[i] = ' '; } if (i == s_len) { /* failure - print some diagnostic */ return NULL; } } return ...


1

This could be because the calling code did not allocate enough space for the string. It must always allocate at least one space larger than the visible characters in the string to allow space for the \0. That being said, since strings are mutable, there is no need to return the string. It it will modify the string as you are working. Here would be a ...


1

This works: #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> char *detab(char *string) { for (int i = 0; string[i] != '\0'; i++) if (string[i] == '\t') string[i] = ' '; return string; } int main ( int argc, char ** argv ) { char str[21] = "\thello\thello\t"; printf( "%s\n", detab( str ) ); return 0; } As ...


0

I'm going to assume I know what you're trying to build, because I just went through this myself and saw the exact same error. The problem is, this code was built a decade or so ago on 32-bit linux, and this conflict did not exist. Now you're (another assumption by me) trying to build it on 64-bit linux and there's a conflict. I don't have the C wherewithal ...


3

If you really need to have an object file that you can link with gcc without using -lstdc++, you can do an incremental link of your C++ object file with -lstdc++ and then use the result of that on your gcc link line. Something like: ld -i -static cpp_src.o -L/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.8 -lstdc++ -o cpp_withstdlib.o This will link your C++ object ...


-1

You seem to trying to combine your link entry information with specific data information/types. Do the link list stuff generically. Then the actual interrogation code will be easy to write. And code using your link lists to create lists will be easy. Your link list entry structure should look like this (by the book): typedef struct{ void* prev; ...


0

From what I could gather, it is a move-only type that stores the actual data of a msgpack::object. It very well might intended to be an implementation detail, but it actually leaks into users' code sometimes. For example, any time you want to capture a msgpack::object in a lambda, you have to capture the msgpack::unpacked object as well. Sometimes you can't ...


1

You're only allocating one struct leo and using the same one for each element you add. You need to allocate a new one for each element you put on the list.


-1

You create 2 pipes (2 read endpoints and 2 write endpoints) before forking, and you never do anything else after forking. First fork creates a copy, and second is executed in both copies so main process will create 3 additional processes each of them will get a pointer to that shared endpoints. As you have no synchronization between those processes you ...


1

The thing is that you first create the second dimension for the index i-1, but on the line that you've specified, you try to access the index i (which you did not created yet). That's why you get a segmentation fault. ;) Hope this helps ! EDIT : Also, don't forget to free the memory !


1

A macro definition isn't a statement and normally won't have a semicolon at the end. Macros in C are expanded literally, before any other syntax checking is done. So when you define #define MAX_RESPONDANTS 20; #define MIN_RESPONSE_VALUE 0; #define MAX_RESPONSE_VALUE 10; #define TERMINATOR -1; and then write printf ("...", MIN_RESPONSE_VALUE, ...


-2

First, you need to heal your math in case that's the problem: http://www.intmath.com/matrices-determinants/1-determinants.php Linear Equations, I assume, you can take a look at this link: http://www.sanfoundry.com/java-program-solve-linear-equation/


0

To insert a node into a tree you first have to search for an empty leaf. Apart from this you do not modify t, so there is no need of writing it back by return value: void insert( char* insert_key, Table t ) { // serach empty leaf, where to insert the new node tree_ptr *ptr = &(t->head); // start at head while ( *ptr != NULL ) ...


0

The problem is ptr is pointing to the address of the pointer to a struct node, instead of directly pointing to a struct node: tree_ptr *ptr = &(t->head); Then when iterating in the while loop, you aren't changing the pointer ptr, but the pointer it is pointing to, which is t->head: (*ptr) = (*ptr)->left; This overwrites the pointer, ...


2

-lstdc++ causes the linker to link to libstdc++, which is gcc's implementation of the C++ standard library. If your code uses any symbols from the standard library (it uses the standard library, and not all code is inlined from headers), it must link libstdc++ (or whichever standard library implementation you use). You can avoid the standard library, or you ...


0

In C , you must pass arrays into a function by reference. Thus, your function header should be void kinetic(long n, double x, double y, double * kint); You could also use the [] notation like is suggested in the comments.


0

First of, the gets function is not really secure and you might want to use fgets instead. Anyway, your piece of code is used to clear the buffer. When you read from the user input, all the things that the user will type is going to be stored in a buffer, and then the program will read from it. That why sometimes you need to clear the buffer so you don't ...


0

just tried this sh-4.3$ gcc -o testforkx testfork.c sh-4.3$ ls ...


1

I won't add to the stack examples that came before me; they could have been taken from my own lecture materials. I want to the three pieces that @Edwin gave you: those are your critical tools. I generally reverse the first two. Applied to your specific problem: Termination: We continue so long as n is positive and x is not 0. When we fail either of ...


1

The code seems to be right (I'm talking only about the syntax here), and I can compile and run it perfectly fine on my computer. So the problem might comes from the way you compile/run the file. This is a .c file, so you might want to use the gcc compiler, for example : gcc your_file.c -o your_exe -Wall -Wextra (the -Wall -Wextra is optionnal but this is ...


3

Please take in considerations the advice from Jongware in the first place, that will be great. Now for the actual code, when you use decimal number you might want to use it everywhere (for example the line y=(x*9/5)+32, could be better like this y = (x * 9.0 / 5.0) + 32.0). But for your problem, the thing is that the first time you're doing it right %.2f, ...


-1

From what I've learned from theory, is that the i does not affect the complexity very much. Since you have an exponential function, the log n would be neglected. Therefore, it would be considered only the big O(n2) instead of the expected O(n2log n). Recall that when we use big-O notation, we drop constants and low-order terms. This is because when the ...


0

When you create a pipe, there are two ends ("file descriptors"), the reading end and the writing end. When you fork(), the child process inherits ALL the open file descriptors, including both ends of ANY open pipe. So, if you want: [child1] >===pipe1===> [parent] >===pipe2===> [child2] for example, then you have a several file descriptors to ...


1

On the first iteration, that inner loop runs for n2 iterations. On the second iteration, it runs for n2 / 2 iterations. On the third iteration, it runs for n2 / 3 iterations, etc. This means that the total work done is n2 + n2 / 2 + n2 / 3 + ... + n2 / n = n2 (1 + 1/2 + 1/3 + 1/4 + ... + 1/n) = n2 Hn (where Hn is the nth harmonic number) = ...


0

As andlabs and mame98 pointed out, GUI toolkits expect your logic to be executed from callbacks that carry out a small amount of work and quickly relinquish control to the main loop. There is no "work after main loop", because the end of the main loop typically coincides application's exit. Restructuring existing code to an event-driven style can be very ...


0

Suggest, write a small program that polls the USB port where the mouse is connected, each time it receives data from the mouse, display that data. Keep track of the correlation between which mouse action you made and the resulting input from the mouse.


0

Answers are provided above for manually coding a string reverse. But if you want to use a built-in function in the string.h library, you can use: strrev(string)


4

Your problem is here: if (pps[i] = NULL) It should be: if (pps[i] == NULL) Remember that = is an assignment operator while == is comparation Also remember to use free at the end of your program to avoid memory leak.


0

The first fork(); creates one child; the second fork(); is run by the father and the child, so you get one second child and a grandchild. So in all you get 4 processes. Each process has 7 opened FDs : 0,1,2 plus fd1[0,1] plus fd2[0,1]). Thus there are 7 times 4 = 28 opened fds. Note that calling fork without checking error/child/father is a very bad idea ! ...


0

call showPPM() immediately after calling getPPM() Suggest passing the filepointer and a pointer to the PPM struct. from: http://netpbm.sourceforge.net/doc/ppm.html Each PPM image consists of the following: A two char "magic number" for identifying the file type. Whitespace (blanks, TABs, CRs, LFs). A width, formatted as ASCII characters in decimal. ...


3

I believe the problem is with the way you bind your output buffer. The critical line is here: layout (location = 3) out float out_shadow; You seem to assume that the value 3 is needed to match the index of the color attachment of the FBO you render to: glFramebufferTexture2D ( GL_FRAMEBUFFER, GL_COLOR_ATTACHMENT0 + ...


0

I am not sure how to interpret your question, it is very confusing. After reformatting your code to try and make sense of it, it appears that you have a typo in the second loop, which probably causes problems: for (l = 11; l <= k; l + 2) Did you mean l += 2?


0

Using malloc_hook does not have much to do with the Linux terminal. You can look at the man page for malloc_hook to try and understand how it works. but it seems to have been deprecated in recent versions of the glibc: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man3/malloc_hook.3.html You can also read the manual page for mallopt for other ways to tweak the ...


0

*scanf() has no standard equivalent ot *printf("%p", ...). Code cannot read pointers is a standard way. struct log_t* read_log; // problem --v while(fscanf(fp, "Node%d's malloc address is %x", &i, &read_log) == 2){ Alternatively code can convert a pointer to an integer, then to a string, then to an integer and ...


-1

#include<stdio.h> #include<stdlib.h> int main() { int year,A,B,C; printf("Enter the value of year :"); scanf("year",&year); A = year%4; B = year%100; C = year%400; if(((A==0) && (B!=0)) || (C==o)) { printf("The year is Leap year"); } else { printf("The year is't Leap year"); } return 0; }



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