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The JSON returns value in a seconds, not in a milliseconds. public static void main(String[] args) { String date = formatDate(Long.valueOf(TimeUnit.SECONDS.toMillis( 1454691600))); //Todays date System.out.println(date); // FRI, 5th } This code works fine and prints expected date: FRI, 5th


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The value 1454691600 is in seconds, not milliseconds. Date date = new Date(1454691600 * 1000L); SimpleDateFormat dateFmt = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE, d"); System.out.println(dateFmt.format(date)); // prints: Fri, 5 System.out.println(date); // prints: Fri Feb 05 12:00:00 EST 2016


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It sounds to me like you should: Work out the first day of the month Determine from that how many "extra" days are "borrowed" from the previous month (e.g. 0 if day 1 is a Monday; 1 if day 1 is a Tuesday etc) Add that to the number of days in the regular month Divide by 7 (with implicit truncation towards 0) There's no need to do half the work you're ...


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I don't have enough reputation to comment that's why i am answering your question here. So first create a pojo class to hold your data you want to pass to next activity . Create an object of that pojo class and put it in the intent object you created here : Intent i = new Intent(MainActivity.this,CalendarView.class); startActivity(i); i.e your ...


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The other Answers are correct, your number seems to be whole seconds rather than a count of milliseconds-from-epoch. java.time FYI, you are using old date-time classes bundled with the earliest versions of Java. They have proven to be troublesome and poorly designed. Java 8 and later supplants those old classes with the java.time framework. Parse Number ...


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Well, it is not quite clear how you define the week of month. For the following discussion, I assume you speak about weeks starting on Monday (like in ISO-8601-standard and in most European countries). There are two possible ways of definition how to handle the start and end of month when counting the weeks. Since the start of week on Monday is not ...


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On the plugin's Site it says: // delete an event (you can pass nulls for irrelevant parameters, note that on Android `notes` is ignored). The dates are mandatory and represent a date range to delete events in. // note that on iOS there is a bug where the timespan must not be larger than 4 years, see issue 102 for details.. call this method multiple ...


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You can try the Freebusy: query. It returns free/busy information for a set of calendars. Free/busy — A time when a calendar has events scheduled is considered "busy", a time when a calendar has no events is considered "free". The Freebusy resource allows querying for the set of busy times for a given calendar or set of calendars. Try to look at this ...


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Try something like this ${=import java.text.SimpleDateFormat; Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(); cal.add(Calendar.DATE, -6); new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd").format(cal.getTime());} you can use it as well for the date and time, just replace the formatting string. The corect pattern for formatting date is yyyy-MM-dd (see SimpleDateFormat javadoc) ...


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I know this is an old question, but in python 3.3+ there is now an easier way to do this using the datetime.timestamp() method: from datetime import datetime timestamp = datetime.now().timestamp()



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