Hot answers tagged

106

I believe that continuations are a special case of callbacks. A function may callback any number of functions, any number of times. For example: var array = [1, 2, 3]; forEach(array, function (element, array, index) { array[index] = 2 * element; }); function forEach(array, callback) { var length = array.length; for (var i = 0; i < length; ...


63

"Implementing call/cc" doesn't really make sense at the layer you're working in; if you can implement call/cc in a language, that just means it has a built-in construct at least as powerful as call/cc. At the level of the language itself, call/cc is basically a primitive control flow operator, just like some form of branching must be. Of course, you can ...


41

Imagine if every single line in your program was a separate function. Each accepts, as a parameter, the next line/function to execute. Using this model, you can "pause" execution at any line and continue it later. You can also do inventive things like temporarily hop up the execution stack to retrieve a value, or save the current execution state to a ...


24

Original answer: Your question, as I understand it, is "what if instead of implementing "await" specifically for task-based asynchrony, rather, the more general control flow operation of call-with-current-continuation had been implemented?" Well, first of all let's think about what "await" does. "await" takes an expression of type Task<T>, obtains an ...


23

Would you like to play a game? Today, you get to be callCC. callCC :: ((a-> (forall r . ContT m r)) -> ContT m a) -> ContT m a -- you are here ^^ Everything to the left of that function arrow are the moves your opponent has made. To the right of the arrow is the end of the game. To win, you must construct ...


17

Common Lisp has a detailed file compilation model as part of the standard language. The model supports compiling the program to object files in one environment, and loading them into an image in another environment. There is nothing comparable in Scheme. No eval-when, or compile-file, load-time-value or concepts like what is an externalizable object, how ...


17

Despite the wonderful writeup, I think you're confusing your terminology a bit. For example, you are correct that a tail call happens when the call is the last thing a function needs to execute, but in relation to continuations, a tail call means the function does not modify the continuation that it is called with, only that it updates the value passed to ...


16

Understanding Scheme I think at least half of the problem with understanding this puzzle is the Scheme syntax, which most are not familiar with. First of all, I personally find the call/cc x to be harder to comprehend than the equivalent alternative, x get/cc. It still calls x, passing it the current continuation, but somehow is more amenable to being ...


16

There are two prerequisites to manually implement call/cc per the Wikipedia quote: the language must support closures you must write your program in continuation passing style (CPS) I suspect you will not like #2. To write your program in continuation passing style: Every function must take a continuation argument Functions must return by calling ...


16

I guess you forgot the part about writing your program in continuation passing style. Once you do that, call/cc is trivial (in Lua or in any other language), as the continuation will be an explicit parameter to all functions (call/cc included). PS: besides closures, you also need proper tail calls to program in continuation passing style.


16

To compare it to C, the current continuation is like the current state of the stack. It has all the functions waiting for the result of the current function to finish so they can resume execution. The variable captured as the current continuation is used like a function, except that it takes the provided value and returns it to the waiting stack. This ...


12

The question is not particularly clear, since what exactly does "implemented with just lambdas and closures" mean? In any case, continuations can be used in any language with closures by manually writing in continuation passing style. Then automatic translation into this form can be implemented by extending the compiler, which Lisps typically allow on user ...


12

You can implement a Y combinator using call/cc, as described here. (Many thanks to John Cowan for mentioning this neat post!) Quoting that post, here's Oleg's implementation: Corollary 1. Y combinator via call/cc -- Y combinator without an explicit self-application. (define (Y f) ((lambda (u) (u (lambda (x) (lambda (n) ((f (u x)) n))))) (call/cc ...


12

I don't think I understand this one fully, but I can only think of one (extremely hand-wavy) explanation for this: The first @ and * are printed when yin and yang are first bound in the let*. (yin yang) is applied, and it goes back to the top, right after the first call/cc is finished. The next @ and * are printed, then another * is printed because this ...


11

You probably understand them better than you think you did. Exceptions are an example of "upward-only" continuations. They allow code deep down the stack to call up to an exception handler to indicate a problem. Python example: try: broken_function() except SomeException: # jump to here pass def broken_function(): raise SomeException() # ...


10

Here's the diagram that was left on our CS lab's whiteboard. So you're going to fetch some apples, and you grab a continuation before you begin. You wander through the forest, collecting apples, when at the end you apply your continuation on your apples. Suddenly, you find yourself where you were before you went into the forest, except with all of your ...


10

In Scheme you can implement call/cc using lambdas when converting to continuation passing style (CPS). When converting into CPS, every occurrence of call/cc can be replaced with the following equivalent: (lambda (f k) (f (lambda (v k0) (k v)) k)) where k is the continuation to be saved, and (lambda (v k0) (k v)) is the escape procedure that restores this ...


10

I see two questions here: Is programming with core.async similar to programming in continuation-passing style? Are the internals of core.async related to CPS? The answer to 1. is "no", because there are no explicit continuations. In fact, this is kind of the point; one of the primary reasons for using core.async is to escape callback hell, which is ...


9

A heads up, this example is not concise nor exceptionally clear. This is a demonstration of a powerful application of continuations. As a VB/ASP/C# programmer, you may not be familiar with the concept of a system stack or saving state, so the goal of this answer is a demonstration and not an explanation. Continuations are extremely versatile and are a way ...


8

If you use a construct like Jay shows, then you can grab the continuation, but in a way, the value that is grabbed is already spoiled because you're already inside that continuation. In contrast, call/cc can be used to grab the continuation that is still pending outside of the current expression. For example, one of the simplest uses of continuations is to ...


8

I find this short draft tutorial a useful starting point. Once you grasp those very basics, a more extensive, Scheme-specific coverage is here; for a broader purview, wikipedia can be of some help (and has a few good links at the end).


8

Look, i've found this Continuation Passing Style best description on this topic.


8

call/cc is trivial to implement. The hard part is setting up the environment where it is possible to implement. We must first define a continuation-passing style (CPS) execution environment. In this environment, your functions (or function-like things) don't directly return values; instead, they are passed a function that represents the 'next step' in the ...


8

The problem is that with call/cc the result depends on the order of evaluation. Consider the following example in Haskell. Assuming we have the call/cc operator callcc :: ((a -> b) -> a) -> a callcc = undefined let's define example :: Int example = callcc (\s -> callcc (\t -> s 3 + t 4 ) ) Both ...


7

Normally, with Seaside, you never have to deal with Continuations yourself at all. You just use #call: and #answer: from within your components. If you're trying to do something else with Continuation other than writing a Seaside application, take a look at WAComponent>>call: for an example of usage. Or try this. Open a Transcript window. Now, in a ...


7

You can't -- you have to have some way to test things and act on whether they're true or false. You could get close though, with some functional representation of booleans. For example, with a common church encoding: (define (true x y) x) (define (false x y) y) and now you can consider a test (that returns one of these encoded booleans) as a function ...


7

To understand what callCC means in Haskell, you might want to rather look at its type, not at its implementation: callCC :: MonadCont m => ((a -> m b) -> m a) -> m a The first and most important thing here is MonadCont m. This means that callCC only works in monads that implement MonadCont -- and this might be a disappointment for you, but IO ...


7

No. This implementation of callcc doesn't depend upon lazy evaluation. To prove this I'll implement it in a strict functional language and show that anything after k n is not executed at all. The strict functional language I'll be using is JavaScript. Since JavaScript is not statically typed you don't need to declare a newtype. Hence we start by defining ...


7

One way to think of a continuation is as a processor stack. When you "call-with-current-continuation c" it calls your function "c", and the parameter passed to "c" is your current stack with all your automatic variables on it (represented as yet another function, call it "k"). Meanwhile the processor starts off creating a new stack. When you call "k" it ...


6

A trivial example of using continuation would be implementing a thread (fiber if you wish) manager on a single-processor machine. The scheduler would interrupt the execution flow periodically (or, in the case of fibers, be invoked at various strategic points in the code), save the continuation state (corresponding to the current thread), then switch to a ...



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