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76

I have compiled kcachegrind on windows using QT4.7, here is the binary bundle (including the dot utility to generate call graph): http://sourceforge.net/projects/precompiledbin/files/kcachegrind.zip/download


12

You should look at callgrind documentation, and read about callgrind_control. Launch your app : valgrind --tool=callgrind --instr-atstart=no your_server.x See 1. start collect profile data: callgrind_control -i on end collect profile data: callgrind_control -i off Analyze data with kcachegrind or callgrind_annotate/cg_annotate


9

Ok, I've found the way. The generated callgrind.out file you can convert to dot file using gprof2dot (yes, this tool can parse callgrind files as well). And then you can get the graph image using dot -T<type> dotfile.dot -o graphfile.<type>


9

Callgrind is a tool, built on valgrind. Valgrind is basically a dynamic binary translator (libVEX, part of valgrind). It will decode every instruction and JIT-compile them into stream of some instructions of the same CPU. As I know, there is no way to enable this translation (in valgrind implementation) for already running process, so dynamic translation is ...


8

Try WebGrind: http://code.google.com/p/webgrind/ Runs on your local PHP server. Be careful, use XDebug profiling with the XDEBUG_PROFILE flag or otherwise you'll risk overwriting your profiling output when you open WebGrind (Since WebGrind is also a PHP web application). The WebGrind website also details other approaches to work around this. Cheers.


7

You can get basic information and annotations from callgrind output file (created by valgrind --tool=callgrind) with the command-line utility callgrind_annotate. (manual page section in docs). For files, generated by cachegrind (valgrind --tool=cachegrind), you can use a cg_annotate (section in docs). These utilities are build by default with valgrind ...


7

I finally managed to solve this issue... This was a config issue: I kept the code for (int i=0; i<maxSample; ++i) { //Prepare data to be processed... CALLGRIND_TOGGLE_COLLECT; //Method to be profiled with these data CALLGRIND_TOGGLE_COLLECT; //Post operation on the data } CALLGRIND_DUMP_STATS; But ran the callgrind with ...


5

You can try WinCacheGrind.


5

Use SSHFS to mount the remote directory that you're working in (see e.g. SSHFS installation instructions for Ubuntu). Then just ssh in and run valgrind --tool=callgrind with whatever options you want in the remote directory. Since you have that directory mounted locally, it's as easy to open the data files with KCacheGrind as if you were debugging locally.


5

Using the following command to generate graph.png using gprof2dot $./gprof2dot.py --format=callgrind --output=out.dot /tmp/cachegrind.out.1360843301.16101 $dot -Tpng out.dot -o graph.png


4

Well you could start with Sun's Java VisualVM application profiling.


4

valgrind --tool=callgrind is able to show a lot of details about where the cpu (and other costs such as cache) is spent. kcachegrind (visualisation tool) can easily show the various costs (including for inlined functions). Try to run e.g. with : valgrind --tool=callgrind --dump-instr=yes --collect-jumps=yes Note: to look costs at instruction level, ...


3

You don't say what OS - I'm assuming Linux - in which case you might want to look at oprofile (free) or Zoom (not free, but you can get an evaluation licence), both of which are sampling profilers and can profile existing code without re-compilation. Zoom is much nicer and easier to use (it has a GUI and some nice additional features), but you probably ...


3

The token attribute exposes a variant, which in addition to the base-iterator range, can _assume the types declared in the token_type typedef: typedef lex::lexertl::token<base_iterator_type, mpl::vector<std::string, int, double>> token_type; So: string, int and double. Note however that coercion into one of the possible types will only occur ...


3

The CPU profiler from gperftools can be attached to arbitrary executables using either LD_PRELOAD or typical dynamic linkage. It can output data in a callgrind-compatible format. Let's assume that you'd like to profile an executable a.out. Begin by linking it with -lprofiler. Afterwards run it with CPUPROFILE env. variable pointing to a name of a file where ...


3

Not necessarily. main is not the "real" entry point of your program, there is lot of stuff going on before and after, for example loading/unloading DLLs and the construction/destruction of globals (those which are dynamically initialized). Those things take time, although normally negligible. Note that there are flags for callgrind that allow to start the ...


2

Ir stands for 'instructions read' IIRC. I recommend kcachegrind, instead, a nice graphical tool that immediately shows everything you need to know.


2

Well you could do some C++ magic to embed a logging object. something like class CDebug { CDebug() { ... log somehow ... } ~CDebug() { ... log somehow ... } }; in your functions then you simply write void foo() { CDebug dbg; ... you could add some debug info dbg.heythishappened() ... } // not dtor is called or if function is ...


2

Currently, this seems not to be supported. It is mentioned on Kcachegrind's whishlist, though.


2

The main() is not the top function in call graph. There is an _start function in glibc, which will call main() and it also will take return value from main. Also there is (for dynamically linked programs = almost all) an ELF interpreter, also known as dynamic linker (run-time): /lib/ld-linux.so (this name is used in linux, in other Unixes something like ...


2

From cachegrind manual: 5.7.1. Cache Simulation Specifics Instructions that modify a memory location (e.g. inc and dec) are counted as doing just a read, i.e. a single data reference. This may seem strange, but since the write can never cause a miss (the read guarantees the block is in the cache) it's not very interesting. Thus it measures ...


2

I'm answering my own question thanks to user n.m. - I discovered this while running a simplified example. The problem was with my compilation instruction, I was compiling to an object file with -g rather than compiling to an executable with -g. Here's a working example for how to get kcachegrind to show annotated source: main.cpp lives in directory ...


2

Compile your program with debug symbols (e.g. GDB symbols works fine, which are activated with the "-ggdb" flag). If you are executing your program like this: ./program Then run it with Valgrind+Callgrind with this command: valgrind --tool=callgrind ./program Callgrind will then produce a file called callgrind.out.1234 (1234 is the process ID and will ...


2

Valgrind/Callgrind doesn't allow this behaviour. Neither kcachegrind does, but I think it will be a good improvement. Maybe some answers could be found on their mailing-list. A working but really boring way could be to use option --separate-thread=no, and update your code to use for each thread a different function name or class name. Depending your code ...


2

I ran into this problem too. The way to fix it is to stop the host application from unloading the plugins before it exits. In my case I was trying to profile C modules for Lua and Lua was unloading the modules when the VM exited normally. To fix this issues I had the script call os.exit() to do a forced shutdown. Either disable plugin unloading in the ...


1

There's a new project called XCallGraph for viewing cachegrind files on Windows.


1

You need build with debug information enabled and to have sources available at the location, they was during build. AFAIK, this may be configured, but by default sources should be at the same location, so if you build on different machine, you should place them as on build machine.


1

Yes, you can. Using callgrind --collect-jumps=yes, and the tools described at the link below, you can get much the same information as gcov. It's not as pretty as lcov, but the time savings might just be worth it. http://benjamin-meyer.blogspot.com/2007/12/valgrind-callgrind-tools-part-3-code.html Note that this works pretty well even with optimized ...


1

Valgrind collects user time statistics, not real time statistics. So if threads are interrupting each other, you won't see it in Valgrind. All you will get is the actual time spent executing each function.



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