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7

calloc is generally malloc+memset to 0 It is generally slightly better to use malloc+memset explicitly, especially when you are doing something like: ptr=malloc(sizeof(Item)); memset(ptr, 0, sizeof(Item)); That is better because sizeof(Item) is know to the compiler at compile time and the compiler will in most cases replace it with the best possible ...


7

Generally in C, the point of the standard library is not to provide a rich set of cool functions. It is to provide an essential set of building blocks, from which you can build your own cool functions. Your proposal for recalloc would be trivial to write, and therefore is not something the standard lib should provide. Other languages take a different ...


6

R.'s answer is good, but I'd like to add the standard quotes to support this, and show a way to 0 initialize your struct that does, in fact, yield NULL pointers. From N1548 (C11 draft) 7.22.3.2 The calloc function allocates space for an array of nmemb objects, each of whose size is size. The space is initialized to all bits zero.[289] The footnote ...


4

You are exceeding the allowable value range for some variables. You have int N=70000. A N*N gives you an int as well, which overflows and gets 605032704 instead, a value which can perfectly be allocated on your system. You should use size_t for calling calloc(). In this case, it is probably large enough for your system even if you have 64 bits. Of course, ...


4

You've said that sizeof (size_t) == 2 (this is for MS-DOS 6.22). That means that the maximum value of size_t is 65535. unsigned long buffSize = 65536; /* 64 KB */ No problem so far. unsigned long must be at least 32 bits (and is 32 bits on your system), so it can easily hold the value 65536. char *block; block = calloc(1, buffSize); Both arguments to ...


4

Use: int ** own; // int**, not int* own = calloc(mem_size, sizeof(int*)); //int*, not int // And remove the explicit cast.


4

However, every time I reference own[i][j], I get an error saying that the subscripted value is neither array nor pointer nor vector. That's right. own[i] is equivalent to *(own + i), which has type int. You cannot apply the subscript operator to an int. Note that what your code appears to be trying to create is not a two-dimensional array, but rather ...


4

Probably your debugger doesn't know how big buffer_buffer is, since that variable is simply declared as being a pointer to an int. (That's not correctly typed; buffer_buffer is used to hold values of buffer which is an int*, so buffer_buffer must be an array of int*, which means that you should declare it as int**, i.e. a pointer to a sequence of int*.) One ...


4

Since you are exiting the program in case of allocation failure, therefore no harm in doing this. You can use second snippet. C does not provide direct support for error handling, aka exception handling. On MSVC you can try this (Note that this is not the part of C standard): void exceptionExample() { int *p = NULL; __try { p = ...


3

You are most likely allocating the correct number of bytes but you are asking how big a pointer to a void is. And on a 64 bit box it will very likely be 8 bytes. If it failed to allocate the amount of memory you asked for then full_message would have the value NULL.


3

The sizeof operator is (almost always) a compile-time operator (exception: VLAs). So the sizeof some pointer is always the same (on your machine, it is always 8) and does not depend of the size passed to some malloc or calloc function. Given a malloc-ed or calloc-ed pointer, there is no portable way to know the size requested at its allocation time. You ...


3

You reserve space for radius*2+1 elements redmatrix = (int**) calloc(radius*2+1,sizeof(int*)); But then you fill and free arrays with radius*2+2 elements for(i=0;i<radius*2+2;i++){ redmatrix[i] = (int*) calloc(radius*2+1,sizeof(int)); for(i=0;i<radius*2+2;i++){ free(redmatrix[i]); ... change to for(i=0;i<radius*2+1;i++){ ...


3

void* calloc(size_t num, size_t size); This allocates a block num elements, each with size given by size. Since you pass 0 for num, you are asking to allocate a block of with zero elements. That's surely not what you intended and hence, somewhere down the line, you encounter an error. I'm not sure what you are attempting to do. It looks like you are ...


3

int *size means you need: size = calloc(sizeof(int), sizeof(buf)); You allocated enough space for an array of char, but not an array of int (unless you're on an odd system where sizeof(char) == sizeof(int), which is a theoretical possibility rather than a practical one). That means your code writes well beyond the end of the allocated memory, which is ...


3

As Petesh notes in the comments: sequence = (unsigned int *) calloc(0, sizeof(unsigned int) * SEQ_SIZE); That line will allocate 0 elements of some non-zero size. You're likely looking for: sequence = calloc(1, sizeof(unsigned int) * SEQ_SIZE); Which works, but doesn't fix some potential overflow issues. So you should actually write: sequence = ...


3

First problem, you don't initialize the values of x or y and still you try to print them, while the other problem, being the more important, is: n = 512/sizeof(int) and then you malloc x = malloc(512/sizeof(int)) you should malloc this way x = malloc(n*sizeof(int)) which yields x = malloc(512) but since you want to allocate 128 of int, it is ...


3

Each of the calls tries to allocate 1.6 GB of memory. I suspect the second call is failing, which would explain the symptoms. Check the return value from calloc().


3

I assume you're interested in only zeroing out the new part of the array: Not every memory allocator knows how much memory you're using in an array. for example, if I do: char* foo = malloc(1); foo now points to at least a chunk of memory 1 byte large. But most allocators will allocate much more than 1 byte (for example, 8, to keep alignment). This can ...


3

malloc() followed by assignment of 0 to all bytes allocated is exactly like calloc(), except perhaps for (minor) performance. In other words... doing calloc() and then using data in a text file to assign values to the allocated memory writes twice to that memory. Use malloc() unless you know the contents of the bytes will be 0. Don't forget to use free() ...


3

No, they are not always equivalent, but on most popular machines you'll be fine. calloc writes a bit pattern of all-zeros to the allocated memory, but the null pointer value might not be all-bits-zero on some machines (or even just for some types on some machines). Check out the Null Pointers section of the C FAQ for lots and lots of information.


3

INT_MAX is 2gb of ram. You're using up that much ram for each row, hence your matrix exceeds your ram capacity.


3

In your code RESERV[i]="Iambananananananananananana"; creates the problem. It overwrites the memory allocated by malloc(). Thus, You face memory leak, because the malloc()ed pointer is lost. You cannot call free() with the changed pointer. It invokes undefined behaviour. Solution: In C, you don't assign strings, instead, you can use strcpy() to get ...


2

You allocate strlen(tx)+strlen("DATA ") bytes for concatenation of those two strings - where is the byte for zero terminator? Use strlen(tx)+strlen("DATA ")+1.


2

Does a call to strcpy after malloc is as good as calling calloc? No, as strcpy(buffer, "") only sets the memory's 1st byte to 0, whereas calloc() zeros out the entire memory allocated. strcpy(buffer, ""); is equivalent to buffer[0] = '\0';. I tend to say the latter is faster. Whether strcpy()'s behaviour is enough of initialisation depends on the ...


2

use memcpy() like memcpy(p,Q[6],13*sizeof(int));


2

The code that you have has undefined behavior. However, you do not get a crash because malloc and calloc indeed often allocate more memory than you ask. One way to tell how much memory you've got is to call realloc with increasing size, until the pointer that you get back is different from the original. Although the standard does not guarantee that this ...


2

You are confounding two kinds of memory allocation: the kernel's and libc's. When you ask malloc or calloc for 5 bytes, it does not turn around and ask the kernel for 5 bytes. That would take forever. Instead, the libc heap system obtains larger blocks of memory from the kernel, and subdivides it. Therefore, when you ask for a small amount of memory, ...


2

You can't work directly with a "bit array" in C. You need to use masking / bitshift operators to access individual bits in larger units (at least an 8-bit char). Also, the correct syntax for what you're attempting is: int *bitmap = calloc(1<<28, sizeof(int)); which will allocate an array of (1<<28) ints. Access them like this: int i; for ...


2

Are you sure your file contains a binary 0? If you trying to read till the end of file, test fgetc result against EOF, not 0. Otherwise your loop never terminates. Besides that, you only processing every second character. Expanding as requested: From man fgetc: fgetc(), getc() and getchar() return the character read as an unsigned char cast to an int ...


2

Change the type of size to char. You are using an int and when you add to the pointer here *(size+i), you go out of bounds. Pointer arithmetic takes account of the type, which in you case is int not char. sizeof int is larger than char on your system.



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