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11

That's a lot of questions. I have never done any CAN related programming in Java, but let's see which questions I might answer anyway: 1) Other than connecting a PC to the CANbus network, what else does the CAN-PC adapter do? It depends mainly on which CAN controller that is embedded in your adapter. But basically it just handles the low-level ...


8

You've already chosen the AT90CAN128, whose standout feature compared to other AVR processors is support for the CAN bus. There really is not a better choice than CAN for an automotive application with your data rate and noise immunity requirements. If you march in to an automotive customer with anything other than CAN, you'll end up spending all your time ...


5

I don't know of any CAN interface that connects to the serial port (it wouldn't be too hard to create one based on a microcontroller with CAN and serial ports). However, standard serial ports would be too slow to support the higher speeds available in CAN. Generally, when using the API for a CAN interface, you will be able to read messages consisting of ID, ...


5

The offerings from GHI support CAN through their .NET Micro extensions. See here for a development system. Refer to the documentation here for details on the CAN implementation:


5

You need SocketCAN driver, that is available on modern Linux distributions like Ubuntu etc. SocketCAN provides a virtual CAN port driver: sudo modprobe vcan sudo ip link add dev vcan0 type vcan sudo ip link set up vcan0 Now you can send and receive CAN frames over vcan0 device. Wikipedia article provides simple code example on how to use SocketCAN. ...


5

You can write a bit banging CAN driver, but it has many limitations. First it's the timeing, it's hard to achieve the bit timing and also the arbitration. You will be able to get 10kb or perhaps even 50kb but that consumes a huge amount of your cpu time. And the code itself is a pain. You have to calculate the CRC on the fly (easy) but to implement the ...


4

We have implemented our CANopen layer from scratch for both embedded ARM and Windows PC devices. It's not impossible, unlike previous answers might make you think. If you need only basic functionality of CANopen and can quickly learn the concepts of the protocol, you can get things up and running rather quickly. You will have to read CiA specification, ...


4

I suspect that most of that time is due to the overhead of forking every time you run cansend. To get rid of it, you'll want an approach that doesn't have to create a new process for each send. According to this blog post, SocketCAN is supported by python 3.3. It should let your program create and use CAN sockets directly. That's probably the direction ...


3

The problem might be a missing ACK. The CAN-Analyzer might acknowledge frames and the device does not switch to error passive. I would hold off sending until the whole bus is initialized.


3

You can download an open source project for CANopen from DATALINK ENGINEERING as this seems to be just what you need. You'll find it here: http://datalink.se/index5.php


3

You can use syscalls directly from kernel space: sys_open(), sys_read(), sys_close(). There's Linuxjournal article about that. P/S: copy_from_user() works perfectly with kernel-space addresses.


3

The solution is to use posix::stream_descriptor. Just open the native socket, bind and then use posix::basic_stream_descriptor::assign.


3

Found this: "The Overload Frame is identical to an Active Error Frame. The only difference is that an Overload Frame does not increase the error counters (see error confinement) and does not causes a retransmission of a frame. Every node may transmit consecutively only 2 Overload Frames." here: ...


3

For all out reliability you can't go past CANbus (but then that was sort of implied by your choice of processor?) Depending on what you want to interface to, this can be very simple - the base level protocol is quite straight forward. But if you want to talk to any other non-proprietary devices you'll have to implement the higher protocols (eg. CANopen). ...


3

There are several CAN Bus Shield boards available (e.g: this, and this), and that would be a far better solution. It is not just a matter of the controller chip, the bus interface, line drivers, and power all need to be considered. If you have the resources and skills you can of course create your own board or bread-board for less. Even if you bit-bang it ...


3

Based on your inputs. You will need to use your arduino to connect your android device to you vehicle. The arduino code will translate data from CAN to bluetooth and the other way around. Indeed your android device can't communicate directly to your CAN bus. Then you will have to create your android application to send/receive data from the arduino. To do ...


3

There is no way at the CAN layer to detect receipt by more than one module. You would need to add messages to your communication protocol to confirm receipt if this is absolutely critical. As mentioned, you could have each module receive the same message and send a unique reply. Some general thoughts: 1) Are the important messages broadcast ...


3

Keil provides some examples and programs for CAN development: http://www.keil.com/dd/vtr/4152/7837.htm Here you can find CAN source for LPC2129: http://www.siwawi.arubi.uni-kl.de/avr_projects/arm_projects/ Here some examples: http://mbed.org/handbook/CAN


3

Developing CAN library is relatively easy as compared to I2C or SPI. This is because CAN Controller of your Cortex will take care of most of complex things. To transmit the data, You have to write ID and Data in designated registers and set bit to transmit data. This Application note from NXP can be very useful for you. I would recommend you to implement ...


3

Since this seems to be a topic of general interest - I agree that understanding the full original specs can be a somewhat painful experience. So here is a suggestion for "get your drive going", as opposed to "implementing the whole thing": Check if your CANopen drives can be operated via the CiA 402 standard objects and for performance reasons it would be ...


2

What you are able to use will be determined by what protocol your devices support. However, the use of a CAN bus is meant primarily to reduce wiring between the components, so implementing it over a wireless protocol is pretty much nonsense. Considering you have the alternatives you mentioned (Ethernet/Bluetooth/Wifi), assuming some kind of TCP/IP network ...


2

As answered earlier, there will not be any issue if it has the same ID and the same data, but if they have different data bytes then: Section 6.1 of the CAN spec 2.0: BIT ERROR: A unit that is sending a bit on the bus also monitors the bus. A BIT ERROR has to be detected at that bit time, when the bit value that is monitored is different from the ...


2

Looks like that driver is a SocketCan driver. Just compile and load the module, and then your device will look like a network interface. http://www.brownhat.org/docs/socketcan/llcf-api.html This link has information about how to send messages and such. Good luck!


2

Look here for more information about socketcan and linux implementation: socketcan


2

PDOs are a type of message used for more efficient and asynchronous messages. PDOs can be sent on a timer, in response to a SYNC message or in response to an event (like a digital input changing). All 8 bytes of the CANbus message payload for your data. In contrast to an SDO where only 4 bytes are available (there are multi-message SDOs like block transfer). ...


2

Yes the SDO transaction is between the client and the server on the defined msg ids, and so any other messages may legitimately exist within these transactions (on other Msg ids), and things like hearbeats and PDOs continue to function in paralell to an SDO transaction. A typical timeout period for a requested response from an SDO server is 500ms this is ...


2

The answer is No. It turns out that CAN devices will indeed just start streaming out messages when you turn them on (well at least this one does). The messages with ids of 0x0 and 0x8000000 are bogus. Even with the radar sensor turned off I continued to see those messages. It turns out I had a hardware problem. The CAN bus requires a 120 Ohm resistor which ...


2

I don't think, that such software exists. CAN bus is more complex, than for example I2C. Basically you would have to implement functionality of both CAN controller and CAN transceiver. See this thread for more details (in German). Alternatively you could use one of the CAN shields. Another option were to use BeagleBone with suitable CAN cape. Also take a ...


2

I think you missed this part of the specification (on page 62): "Exception 1: If the TRANSMITTER is 'error passive' and detects an ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ERROR because of not detecting a 'dominant' ACK and does not detect a 'dominant' bit while sending its PASSIVE ERROR FLAG. " In this case, the TEC is not changed! So, in your case, when the only node in the ...


2

You can use following constellation (this is not the complete solution, but just algorithm): while(1) { FD_ZERO(&rdfs); FD_SET(s, &rdfs); tv.tv_sec = 0; tv.tv_usec = 10000; // microseconds rc = select(s + 1, &rdfs, NULL, NULL, &tv); // rc == 0 - timeout if (!rc) { // write your CAN frame } if ...



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