Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

67

The problem with your example is that all your subs are in the same package (the default package: main). That's not the use case that Carp was designed for. Carp is intended to be used in modules. The reason is that when a module encounters a problem, it's often because the module's caller passed it bad data. Therefore, instead of reporting the line ...


36

carp gives you more info as to where the the message comes from (context) #!/usr/bin/perl use Carp; foo(); bar(); baz(); sub foo { warn "foo"; } sub bar { carp "bar"; } sub baz { foo(); bar(); } produces foo at ./foo.pl line 9. bar at ./foo.pl line 13 main::bar() called at ./foo.pl line 6 foo at ./foo.pl line 10. bar at ./foo.pl ...


31

Use Devel::SimpleTrace or Carp::Always and they'll do what you're asking for without any hard work on your part. They have global effect, which means they can easily be added for just one run on the commandline using e.g. -MDevel::SimpleTrace.


19

I use warn for scripts and simple programs, and Carp inside any modules. The Carp subroutines use the filename and line number where your current subroutine was called so it's easier to find who's causing the problem (not just where the problem manifested itself). Damian recommends Carp instead of warn in "Reporting Failure" in Perl Best Practices, but ...


14

Carp is better than warn/die in that it will display the file and line of what called the function throwing an error, rather than simply where the error was thrown. This can often be useful for libraries. (For instance, a database library should probably throw errors indicating where the erroneous database call is, rather than indicating a line within ...


13

See the perldoc for Carp. carp is a alternative for Perl's warn function that uses stack trace information to show you where you called a function that issued a warning. This can be more helpful than warn's behavior of telling you where the warning occurred. An example: This program: 1: sub square_root { 2: my $arg = shift; 3: if ($arg < 0) { 4: ...


10

What about setting a __DIE__ signal handler? Something like $SIG{__DIE__} = sub { Carp::confess @_ }; at the top of your script? See perlvar %SIG for more information.


10

carp works better for debugging within modules. If you are only writing a simple script, there is no benefit. From the Carp documenation: The Carp routines are useful in your own modules because they act like die() or warn(), but with a message which is more likely to be useful to a user of your module. In the case of cluck, confess, and longmess that ...


8

prove -M does not appear to be equivalent to perl -M. It appears to load a prove extension, not load a module into your tests. The docs are totally unclear on this point, but the code in App::Prove is not. So prove -MCarp=verbose imports Carp::verbose into App::Prove causing the problem above. A simple way to do what you want is to use the PERL5OPT ...


7

Carp reports errors from the caller's perspective. This is useful for modules where you typically want to warn about incorrect usage (e.g. a missing argument) and identify the place where the error occurred as opposed to where it was detected. This is especially important for utility functions that might be used in many places. Most authors use warn in ...


5

make_immutable seems to fix that. Of course, I don't know what to do if you do need your classes to be mutable. Without make_immutable, Test->new invokes Moose::Object->new. If you look at the confess output, you'll note: Test::BUILD(...) called ... Class::MOP::Method::execute(...) called ... Moose::Object::BUILDALL(...) called ... ...


3

carp does not die but just prints a warning, so there's nothing to catch with eval or whatever. You can, however, overwrite the warn handler locally to prevent the warning from being sent to stderr: #!/usr/bin/env perl use warnings; use strict; use Carp; carp "Oh noes!"; { local $SIG{__WARN__} = sub { my ($warning) = @_; # Replace ...


3

Based on your comments, my understanding is that you would like to make carp into a fatal warning. If it is acceptable to make all carp warnings in your target package into fatal errors you can monkey-patch carp. Carping Package: package Foo; use Carp; sub annoying_sub { carp "Whine whine whine"; } Main program: use Foo; *Foo::carp = ...


3

prove has a very different set of command line arguments than perl, being a completely different program? prove's -M is, I believe, intended for enabling pragmas; Carp actually exports a forward reference to a verbose() subroutine, which interferes with prove's inner workings. You can create a small module like this: # Verbme.pm use Carp; $Carp::Verbose = ...


3

and ran nmake. why use nmake? DWIMPerl( StrawberryPerl) is not known to come with nmake, generally they come with dmake, and AFAIK, their documentation reflects this


3

Carp is a core module so it be included with your Perl installation. Just try use Carp in your code.


3

It's regular_code that's considered "safe" by this_may_fail. The check is based on namespace, so to make it unsafe, you'd place this_may_fail in a different namespace. Or write your own croaker. perl -e' use Carp qw( ); sub untrusting_croak { goto &Carp::croak if $Carp::Verbose; my @caller = caller(1); die(join("", @_)." at ...


3

Not especialy pretty, but, instead of this: sub regular_code { ...; my $result = this_may_fail(@args); } You could use this... sub regular_code { ...; my $result = do { my $sub = \&this_may_fail; package DUMMY; $sub->(@args) }; }


2

Carp comes with your Perl distribution, it is a core module. corelist (offline version) shows you the standard modules that come with various Perl versions. You'll see that Carp comes with all Perl versions as far back as 5. There's nothing to download. Just use Carp. One of the hard things to understand about Perl for many people is that certain ...


2

Carp uses Exporter's EXPORT_FAIL mechanism to handle the verbose "option" to import, which is pretty much wrong, as Exporter::Heavy will still try to assign *Carp::verbose to *{"$callerpkg::verbose"} despite the fact that it was "failed". Unfortunately, App::Prove has a verbose sub that it depends on to work, and your -M option causes the import to happen ...


2

Don't bother with numpy uint32. Just use standard Python int. Constrain the result of operations as necessary by doing result &= 0xFFFFFFFF to remove unwanted high-order bits. def key_hash(data): # hash should be a 32-bit unsigned integer hashed = 0 for char in data: # hashed += ((hashed << 19) + ord(char)) & 0xFFFFFFFF ...


2

I usually only want to replace the dies in a bit of code, so I localize the __DIE__ handler: { use Carp; local $SIG{__DIE__} = \&Carp::confess; .... } As a development tool this can work, but some modules play tricks with this to get their features to work. Those features may break in odd ways when you override the handler they were expecting. ...


1

Well, I never tried to show the call stack, but for my programs I used to do the following. First, I define a function that do the actual logging. This is just an example; please note that this function is highly insecure (buffer overrun anyone?) void strLog(char *file, char *function, int line, char *fmt, ...) { char buf[1024]; va_list args; ...


1

But I want something a little better with access to file, line, and function names in the call stack like Perl's caller subroutine. The problem is that this requires help from the programmer to decide where the boundary appears between your library code and the 'caller' subroutine. Perl uses some magic (aka heuristics) to do that; maybe you could do ...


1

It appears that nothing exists quite like the Carp module for use in C programs, so i wrote a small library to do it at github. The library has the following exports defined for use: warn, die carp, croak cluck, confess and I've added e-varieties of the previous ones for adding errno strings to the warning since i thought it would be useful: ewarn, edie ...


1

Your code works for me on perl v5.10.1, with Carp.pm version 1.11. However, note that what it does is perhaps not what you expect: the backtrace produced by longmess will show where the logwrite function was called from, not where the actual error occurred inside the eval.


1

Some confusion here. First, confess (and all the other carps in the pond) don't print to STDOUT: they print to STDERR. Second, you're stopping the exception and hence the associated output using try/catch (glorified eval), so it's not printed unless you explicitly print it yourself. You'll see warnings, but you won't see messages of instructions that would ...


1

The following works for me, though maybe a little unpythonic: from numpy import uint32 def key_hash(data): # hash should be a 32-bit unsigned integer hashed = uint32() for char in data: hashed += hashed << uint32(19) + uint32(ord(char)) return hashed x = key_hash("testkey") print type(x) The problem is that numbers are ...


1

This turned out to be a problem with the version of Perl I was using. Upgrading to 5.16.1 resolved the problem.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible