Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

83

Sure thing. It is a bit tricky to do this with LINQ but certainly possible using only the standard query operators. UPDATE: This is the subject of my blog on Monday June 28th 2010; thanks for the great question. Also, a commenter on my blog noted that there is an even more elegant query than the one I gave. I'll update the code here to use it. The tricky ...


43

This is very easy with list comprehensions. To get the cartesian product of the lists xs and ys, we just need to take the tuple (x,y) for each element x in xs and each element y in ys. This gives us the following list comprehension: cartProd xs ys = [(x,y) | x <- xs, y <- ys]


39

Ok, I wrote an example for myself reflecting your structure and this should work: int projectId = 1; // replace that with the id you want // required for the joins in QueryOver Project pAlias = null; Partner paAlias = null; PartnerCosts pcAlias = null; Address aAlias = null; Money mAlias = null; // Query to load the desired project and nothing else var ...


30

As other answers have noted, using a list comprehension is the most natural way to do this in Haskell. If you're learning Haskell and want to work on developing intuitions about type classes like Monad, however, it's a fun exercise to figure out why this slightly shorter definition is equivalent: import Control.Monad (liftM2) cartProd :: [a] -> [b] ...


30

Here's a solution I wouldn't be ashamed to show. Rationale Assume that we have an input array $input with N sub-arrays, as in your example. Each sub-array has Cn items, where n is its index inside $input, and its key is Kn. I will refer to the ith item of the nth sub-array as Vn,i. The algorithm below can be proved to work (barring bugs) by induction: ...


29

Consider this solution using the NDGRID function: sets = {[1 2], [1 2], [4 5]}; [x y z] = ndgrid(sets{:}); cartProd = [x(:) y(:) z(:)]; cartProd = 1 1 4 2 1 4 1 2 4 2 2 4 1 1 5 2 1 5 1 2 5 2 2 5 Or if you want a general solution for any number of sets ...


26

The complexity of cartesian product is O(n2), there is no shortcut. In specific cases, the order you iterate your two axis is important. For example, if your code is visiting every slot in an array — or every pixel in an in image — then you should try to visit the slots in natural order. An image is typically laid out in ‘scanlines’, so the pixels on any ...


23

If your input lists are of the same type, you can get the cartesian product of an arbitrary number of lists using sequence (using the List monad). This will get you a list of lists instead of a list of tuples: > sequence [[1,2,3],[4,5,6]] [[1,4],[1,5],[1,6],[2,4],[2,5],[2,6],[3,4],[3,5],[3,6]]


23

Here's one way: [X,Y] = meshgrid(p,q); result = [X(:) Y(:)]; The output is: result = 1.0000 0.7500 1.0000 0.8500 1.0000 0.9500 5.0000 0.7500 5.0000 0.8500 5.0000 0.9500 10.0000 0.7500 10.0000 0.8500 10.0000 0.9500


22

You can do it with a list comprehension: [ (x,y) for x in L for y in L] edit You can also use itertools.product as others have suggested, but only if you are using 2.6 onwards. The list comprehension will work will all versions of Python from 2.0. If you do use itertools.product bear in mind that it returns a generator instead of a list, so you may ...


21

Another approach that tests a bit faster for me is to use meshgrid + dstack: >>> numpy.dstack(numpy.meshgrid(x, y)).reshape(-1, 2) array([[1, 4], [2, 4], [3, 4], [1, 5], [2, 5], [3, 5]]) I did a few tests; see the end of this post for a very simple, general solution that performs very well, if not always ...


20

>>> arrays = [(-1,+1), (-2,+2), (-3,+3)] >>> list(itertools.product(*arrays)) [(-1, -2, -3), (-1, -2, 3), (-1, 2, -3), (-1, 2, 3), (1, -2, -3), (1, -2, 3), (1, 2, -3), (1, 2, 3)]


19

It's not clear what you're asking for - what you expect the semantics of multiple yield to be. One thing, though, is that you probably never want to use indexes to navigate a list - each call to t(i) is O(i) to execute. So here's one possibility that you might be asking for scala> val l = List(1,2,3); val t = List(-1,-2,-3) l: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3) ...


19

The number of possible combinations ist given by N = size(A) * size(B) * size(C) and you can index all items by an index i ranging from 0 to N (exclusive) via c(i) = [A[i_a], B[i_b], C[i_c]] where i_a = i/(size(B)*size(C)) i_b = (i/size(C)) mod size(B) i_c = i mod size(C) (all sets are assumed to be indexable starting wih zero, / is integer ...


18

This works because using lists as monads in Haskell makes them model indeterminism. Consider: sequence [[1,2],[3,4]] By definition this is the same as: do x <- [1,2] y <- [3,4] return [x,y] Just read it as "First a choice between 1 and 2, then a choice between 3 and 4". The list monad will now accumulate all possible outcomes - hence the ...


17

My Set::CrossProduct module does exactly what you want. Note that you aren't really looking for permutations, which is the ordering of the elements in a set. You're looking for the cross product, which is the combinations of elements from different sets. My module gives you an iterator, so you don't create it all in memory. You create a new tuple only when ...


15

Edit: Previous solutions for two sets removed. See edit history for details. Here is a way to do it recursively for an arbitrary number of sets: public static Set<Set<Object>> cartesianProduct(Set<?>... sets) { if (sets.length < 2) throw new IllegalArgumentException( "Can't have a product of fewer than two ...


15

using System; using System.Text; public static string[] GenerateCombinatins(string[] Array1, int[] Array2) { if(Array1 == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("Array1"); if(Array2 == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("Array2"); if(Array1.Length != Array2.Length) throw new ArgumentException("Must be the same size as Array1.", ...


14

That's actually not permutation but Cartesian product. See Math::Cartesian::Product. #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use Math::Cartesian::Product; cartesian { print "@_\n" } ["big", "tiny", "small"], ["red", "yellow", "green"], ["apple", "pear", "banana"]; Output: C:\Temp> uu big red apple big red pear big red banana big yellow ...


13

The itertools module contains a number of helpful functions for this sort of thing. It looks like you may be looking for product: >>> import itertools >>> L = [1,2,3] >>> itertools.product(L,L) <itertools.product object at 0x83788> >>> list(_) [(1, 1), (1, 2), (1, 3), (2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 3), (3, 1), (3, 2), (3, 3)] ...


13

There is a very elegant way to do this with Applicative Functors: import Control.Applicative (,) <$> [1,2,3] <*> [4,5,6] -- [(1,4),(1,5),(1,6),(2,4),(2,5),(2,6),(3,4),(3,5),(3,6)] The basic idea is to apply a function on "wrapped" arguments, e.g. (+) <$> (Just 4) <*> (Just 10) -- Just 14 In case of lists, the function will be ...


12

Prelude> sequence [[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]] [[1,3,5],[1,3,6],[1,4,5],[1,4,6],[2,3,5],[2,3,6],[2,4,5],[2,4,6]]


12

Try ALLCOMB function at FileExchange. If you store you vectors in a cell array, you can run it like this: a = {[1 2], [1 2], [4 5]}; allcomb(a{:}) ans = 1 1 4 1 1 5 1 2 4 1 2 5 2 1 4 2 1 5 2 2 4 2 2 5


12

Try this >>> import itertools >>> a=['1','2','3'] >>> b=['bc','b'] >>> c=['#'] >>> print [ "".join(res) for res in itertools.product(a,b,c) ] ['1bc#', '1b#', '2bc#', '2b#', '3bc#', '3b#']


12

First, I'll show you a recursive version. // Cartesion product of vector of vectors #include <vector> #include <iostream> #include <iterator> // Types to hold vector-of-ints (Vi) and vector-of-vector-of-ints (Vvi) typedef std::vector<int> Vi; typedef std::vector<Vi> Vvi; // Just for the sample -- populate the intput data ...


11

sequence acts as if it were defined like this. sequence [] = return [] sequence (m:ms) = do x <- m xs <- sequence ms return (x:xs) (Or sequence = foldr (liftM2 (:)) (return []) but anyhow…) Just think about what happens when applied to a list of lists. sequence [] = [[]] sequence (list : lists) = [ x : xs | x <- list , ...


11

This is a lot easier to do as a for-comprehension than by trying to work out the recursion manually: (defn cart [colls] (if (empty? colls) '(()) (for [x (first colls) more (cart (rest colls))] (cons x more)))) user> (cart '((a b c) (1 2 3) (black white))) ((a 1 black) (a 1 white) (a 2 black) (a 2 white) (a 3 black) (a 3 white) ...


11

You're close: from itertools import product, izip for i in product(*p.itervalues()): print dict(izip(p, i)) {'a': 1, 'b': 5} {'a': 1, 'b': 6} ... {'a': 3, 'b': 8}


10

>>> list(itertools.product(*arrays)) [(-1, -2, -3), (-1, -2, 3), (-1, 2, -3), (-1, 2, 3), (1, -2, -3), (1, -2, 3), (1, 2, -3), (1, 2, 3)] This will feed all the pairs as separate arguments to product, which will then give you the cartesian product of them. The reason your version isn't working is that you are giving product only one argument. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible