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3

Julia is usually very fast in nested loops, so if the they are working correctly for you, you should proabably check the performance maybe just stick with it. Other option would be using repmat (this one is a little faster than using repeat): [repmat(x,1,length(y))'[:] repmat(y,length(x),1)[:]] Did some quick testing of both methods: x=rand(1000) ...


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Here's how I might do it: julia> x = [1, 2, 3, 4]; julia> y = [9, 8, 7]; julia> [repeat(x, inner=[size(y,1)]) repeat(y, outer=[size(x,1)])] 12x2 Array{Int64,2}: 1 9 1 8 1 7 2 9 2 8 2 7 3 9 3 8 3 7 4 9 4 8 4 7 you may also want to take a look at Iterators.j -- specifically the product function.


2

Here is an simple example of implementing Cartesian product using vector. Vectors are much better choice as we do not need to worry about its size as it dynamically changes it. #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <utility> using namespace std; int main() { int M[2]= {1,2}; int J[3] = {0,1,2}; ...


2

May be you are looking for this INSERT INTO table2(t2_id, t1_id) SELECT 110202,t1_id FROM table1


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#include <iostream> #include <iterator> #include <vector> #include <utility> template<typename Range1, typename Range2, typename OutputIterator> void cartesian_product(Range1 const &r1, Range2 const &r2, OutputIterator out) { using std::begin; using std::end; for (auto i = begin(r1);i != end(r1); ++i) { ...


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I think using of c++ two-dimensional arrays is a very bad idea, but if you want, you probably could use this code #include <iostream> int** cartesian_prod( int* s1, int* s2, int s1size, int s2size ) { int ressize = s1size*s2size; int** res = new int*[ressize]; for ( int i = 0; i < s1size; i++ ) ...



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