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11

This is a lot easier to do as a for-comprehension than by trying to work out the recursion manually: (defn cart [colls] (if (empty? colls) '(()) (for [x (first colls) more (cart (rest colls))] (cons x more)))) user> (cart '((a b c) (1 2 3) (black white))) ((a 1 black) (a 1 white) (a 2 black) (a 2 white) (a 3 black) (a 3 white) ...


11

You're close: from itertools import product, izip for i in product(*p.itervalues()): print dict(izip(p, i)) {'a': 1, 'b': 5} {'a': 1, 'b': 6} ... {'a': 3, 'b': 8}


7

The product function will work: from itertools import product for j in product(range(100), range(200)): print j Alternatively, from the product documentation: Equivalent to nested for-loops in a generator expression. For example, product(A, B) returns the same as ((x,y) for x in A for y in B).


7

I think there are some improvements that can be made over your current approach. But first, let's implement a basic cartisian-product. Then we can adapt it to accept an ignores list. This is easy enough using for and some recursion: (defn cartesian-product [colls] (if (empty? colls) (list ()) (for [e (first colls) sub-product ...


6

The problem is you have created a raw Set, instead of a generic one. What happens is you're trying to pass a List<Set<Object extends String>> to the Sets.cartesianProduct() and this is why you're receiving a compile-type error. This compiles: List<Set<String>> interimList = new ArrayList<Set<String>>(); //converting ...


5

Best guess, based on @abarnert's interpretation (and assuming that the healthy and insane values in the current output are wrong, as they only have four members): d1 = {'status': ['online', 'Away', 'Offline'] ,'absent':['yes', 'no', 'half day']} d2 = {'healthy': ['yes', 'no'], 'insane': ['yes', 'no']} d1_columns = zip(*d1.values()) d2_columns = ...


5

This late answers provides two additional solutions: If you have the Neural Network Toolbox: use combvec If you do not have the toolbox, as is usually the case: below is another way to generalize the Cartesian product for any number of sets. Just as Amro did in his answer, the comma-separated lists syntax (v{:}) supplies both the inputs and outputs of ...


5

If you don't know the dimension of the input, then you need to use recursion as @legoscia said: cartesian([H]) -> [[A] || A <- H]; cartesian([H|T]) -> [[A|B] || A <- H, B <- cartesian(T)]. A 1-dim input "abc" is turned into ["a", "b", "c"], everything else is recursion. > cartesian:cartesian(["abc", "def", "ghi"]). ...


5

Here's a pure bash one: #!/bin/bash pool=( {a..d} ) for((i=0;i<${#pool[@]}-1;++i)); do for((j=i+1;j<${#pool[@]};++j)); do printf '%s\n' "${pool[i]}${pool[j]}" done done and another one: #!/bin/bash pool=( {a..d} ) while ((${#pool[@]}>1)); do h=${pool[0]} pool=("${pool[@]:1}") printf '%s\n' "${pool[@]/#/$h}" done ...


5

You can do a combination of a label scan for p1 and then index lookup + comparison for p2: see here: cypher 2.1 foreach (i in range(1,100000) | create (:Person {name:"John Doe"+str(i % 10000), email:"john"+str(i % 10000)+"@doe.com"})); +-------------------+ | No data returned. | +-------------------+ Nodes created: 100000 Properties ...


4

try this: it combines the two dict values, does the product, then re-separates them to turn into a dict. import itertools dictionary_1 = {'status': ['online', 'Away', 'Offline'], 'Absent':['yes', 'no', 'half day']} dictionary_2 = {'healthy': ['yes', 'no', 'recovering'], 'insane': ['yes', 'no', 'partially' ]} keys = ...


4

Here you go: setkey(B, f, x) setkey(B[CJ(unique(f), unique(x)), allow.cartesian = T, roll = T, rollends = c(F,F)], x)[A, allow.cartesian = T] # x f z y #1: 1 Alice 101 a #2: 1 Bob 104 a #3: 2 Alice 102 b #4: 2 Bob 104 b #5: 3 Alice 103 c #6: 3 Bob 104 c #7: 4 Alice NA d #8: 4 Bob 105 d #9: 5 NA NA e And you can filter out ...


3

Maybe I'm missing something, but isn't it as simple as this: for i in range(100): for j in range(200): print i, j Slightly more optimized version: inner_range = range(200) for i in range(100): for j in inner_range: print i, j


3

You want ndgrid instead of meshgrid in this case. meshgrid's syntax is [X,Y] = meshgrid(xgv,ygv) which causes Y(:) to vary fastest rather than X(:). See Gridded Data Representation for more details. In other words, you are getting >> [vec1, vec2, vec3] = meshgrid(params1, params2, params3) vec1(:,:,1) = 100 200 300 100 200 300 ...


3

Here's a concise implementation that is also designed to minimize the size of the resulting structure in memory, by sharing the tails of the component lists. It uses SRFI-1. (define (cartesian-product . lists) (fold-right (lambda (xs ys) (append-map (lambda (x) (map (lambda (y) ...


3

Fetching Collections is a difficult operation. It has many side effects (as you realized, when there are fetched more collections). But even with fetching one collection, we are loading many duplicated rows. In general, for collections loading, I would suggest to use the batch processing. This will execute more SQL queries... but not so much, and what is ...


3

That's where you need an extra step of eval: This resembles your ruby script (without the counting): f() { for arg do echo "[$arg]" done } And this is how you then call this: eval f "-f 'cmd "{1,2,3}"'" The output is the expected: [-f] [cmd 1] [-f] [cmd 2] [-f] [cmd 3]


3

This type of problem is my cup of tea. Here are my thoughts: Let's take a step back The key objective here is to reduce the amount of time taken to evaluate the results. You have 3^24 = 282+ billion evaluations that need to be performed which cannot be avoided. However, there are a few tricks that can be employed to make lighter work of the problem (the ...


3

I also found an alternative way of doing this. I've accepted the other answer as that produces a result more closely matching that requested by the question, but this might also be useful for some people. The difference is what happens at the end of the series. C = B[, .SD[A, roll = TRUE, rollends = FALSE], by = f] setkey(C, x) > C f x z y ...


3

You can use awk to filter away the entries you don't want: echo {a,b,c,d}{a,b,c,d} | awk -v FS="" -v RS=" " '$1 == $2 { next } ; $1 > $2 { SEEN[ $2$1 ] = 1 ; next } ; { SEEN[ $1$2 ] =1 } ; END { for ( I in SEEN ) { print I } }' In details: echo {a,b,c,d}{a,b,c,d} \ | awk -v FS="" -v RS=" " ' # Ignore identical values $1 == $2 { next } # ...


3

Here is a way to approach this problem: Generate the list of all co-authors as a subquery. Generate the list of all authors. Then join these together and do the string manipulation to get what you want. The authors is easy: select paperid, npa.name as author from newpaperauthor npa; The co-authors is easy: select paperid, string_agg(npa.name, ' ') ...


3

In plain Python, you can generate the Cartesian product of a collection of iterables using itertools.product. >>> arrays = range(0, 2), range(4, 6), range(8, 10) >>> list(itertools.product(*arrays)) [(0, 4, 8), (0, 4, 9), (0, 5, 8), (0, 5, 9), (1, 4, 8), (1, 4, 9), (1, 5, 8), (1, 5, 9)] In Numpy, you can combine numpy.meshgrid (passing ...


3

The first part of the error message is somewhat misleading. The following will compile and work just fine: var agg = lists.Aggregate( new List<List<int>>(), (acc, next) => (from ac in acc from n in next // select ac.Add(n)).ToList()); select ac.Concat(new[] {n}).ToList()).ToList()); The real problem is with select ...


2

Personally, I would use amalloy's for solution. My general rule of thumb is that if my loop can be expressed as a single map/filter/etc call with a simple function argument (so a function name or short fn/#() form), its better to use the function. As soon as it gets more complex than that, a for expression is far easier to read. In particular, for is far ...


2

For the sake of comparison, in the spirit of the original (defn cart ([xs] xs) ([xs ys] (mapcat (fn [x] (map (fn [y] (list x y)) ys)) xs)) ([xs ys & more] (mapcat (fn [x] (map (fn [z] (cons x z)) (apply cart (cons ys more)))) xs))) (cart '(a b c) '(d e f) '(g h i)) ;=> ((a d g) (a d h) (a d i) (a e g) (a e h) (a e i) (a f g) (a ...


2

You can think of your problem as the Cartesian Product of N sequences, where each sequence are the numbers from zero to one of your N specified values. Eric Lippert has written a fantastic post explaining how to generate the Cartesian Product of N sequences using LINQ. The code he arrives at in the end is: static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> ...


2

The problem is coNP-Complete, so there is no efficient algorithm to solve it. I will show that 3SAT can be reduced to the complement of this problem (checking if the union of all Si is not equal to S). Consider the 3SAT problem with variables a, b, ..., k and Boolean formula         f = c1 ∧ c2 ∧ ... ∧ ...


2

I suggest a little pre-processing to keep the result general: options = { a:[1,2], b:[3,4], c:5 } options.each_key {|k| options[k] = [options[k]] unless options[k].is_a? Array} => {:a=>[1, 2], :b=>[3, 4], :c=>[5]} I edited to make a few refinements, principally the use of inject({}): class Hash def self_product f, *r = map {|k,v| ...


2

My solution uses a simple recursive algorithm to create the combinations: When we walk through the sequence we can immediately return a sequence that only holds the current value. I have written a simple extension method to create an IEnumerable for a single item. Next we recursively generate all combinations for the remaining elements with the threshold ...


2

I would check https://github.com/clojure/math.combinatorics it has (combo/cartesian-product [1 2] [3 4]) ;;=> ((1 3) (1 4) (2 3) (2 4))



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