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0

Ok I came up with a solution. It might not be the best one and there are for sure some improvements of the code possible but its enough for my purposes and in case someone needs it too: vector<string> getProducts(vector<string> s) { int combinations = 1; vector<string> res; for (unsigned int i=0; i<s.size(); i++) { combinations *= ...


-1

May be the result is achievable with std::accumulate. One needs a Binary operation of this form std::vector<string> product(const std::vector<string> &init, string value) { std::string result ; for (auto ch : value) if (init.empty()) result.push_back(string(1, ch)) ; else for (auto str : ...


0

I write this as an answer only since I've not enough reputation to comment yet but may this be what you're looking for? Generate the Cartesian Product of 2 vector<string>s In-Place?


0

I solved my issue with memory by performing a depth first cartesian product. I can weigh the solutions one at a time and retain some if I choose or simply output them as I am doing here in this code snippet. The main inspiration for this solution came from the very concise answer on this question. Here is my code as it seems like finding a php depth first ...


0

My attempt worked well enough for my needs: function Get-CartesianProduct { [CmdletBinding()] param( [Parameter(Mandatory = $true)] [object[]] $List1, [Parameter(Mandatory = $true)] [object[]] $List2) process { $List1 | %{ $Item1 = $_ $List2 | ...


0

You can use List Comprehensions: [(i, j) for i in mydict['item1'] for j in mydict['item2']]


0

you could do two for loops. - the first one would keep track of the index position of the first item list. -The second loop would go through each item in the second. - After it runs through all the items, the first for loop would increment to the next item in its list and the second loop will run through the second list again, etc.


2

You can also brute force it using two loops mydict = {'item1':[1,2,3],'item2':[10,20,30]} x = [] for i in mydict['item1']: for j in mydict['item2']: x.append((i,j)) All this code does is go through all of the item in mydict['item1'], then through each item in mydict['item2'], then appends a pair of each to a new list. It will give you this ...


11

The itertools.product() function will do this: >>> import itertools >>> mydict = {'item1':[1,2,3],'item2':[10,20,30]} >>> list(itertools.product(*mydict.values())) [(10, 1), (10, 2), (10, 3), (20, 1), (20, 2), (20, 3), (30, 1), (30, 2), (30, 3)] If you need to control the order of the resulting tuples, you can do ...


1

The program can look the following way #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> int main( void ) { const char *first[] = { "1", "2", "3" }; const char *second[] = { "a" , "b" , "c", "e" }; const size_t N = sizeof( first ) / sizeof( *first ); const size_t M = sizeof( second ) / sizeof( *second ); char product[N * M][3]; ...


3

Problems in your code: sizeof(first)(and sizeof(second)) gives number of string literals in the array * sizeof(char*). You need to discard the second part. Just divide it by sizeof(char*) or sizeof(*str) as @BLUEPIXY suggested which is the same as sizeof(str[0]): int size = (sizeof(first) / sizeof(*first)) * (sizeof(second) / sizeof(*second)); Your ...



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