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1

Using lower in the type is nice way of doing this, if you don't mind loosing the case information. If you want to retain the case, you could define a custom choices class. The choices needs two methods, __contains__ (for testing in), and iteration (to list the choices). class mylist(list): # list subclass that uses lower() when testing for 'in' ...


0

I've used this to accomplish something more useful for comparing two strings: def strings_iequal(first, second): try: return first.upper() == second.upper() except AttributeError: if not first: if not second: return True


4

Transform the argument into lowercase by using type = lambda s : s.lower() for the -p switch. As pointed out by chepner in the comments, since str.lower is already an appropriate function, the lambda wrapper is not necessarily needed and you could instead simply use type = str.lower directly.


1

It's my understanding that this isn't supported. The case_sensitive option applies to the column being validated and the scope option applies only to columns in the same table. You could try using PG's lower like so scope: "lower(realm)" but I suspect it'll fail when trying to access the column table_name.lower(realm) What you need to do is replace that ...


0

If you're using .NET, the official recommendation from Microsoft is to use StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase for comparison and ToUpperInvariant for normalization (to be later compared using Ordinal comparison). This also applies to Registry keys and values, environment variables etc. See New Recommendations for Using Strings in Microsoft .NET 2.0 for more ...


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String has method toUpperCase and toLowerCase, you can make both of this strings to lowerCase and then compare them


0

There's no way to do this with Kibana. However, you can do this at the elasticsearch level with a tokeniser. You'd set up something like this: $ curl -XPUT localhost:9200/testindex/ -d ' { "settings":{ "index":{ "analysis":{ "analyzer":{ "case_insensitive_analyser":{ "tokenizer":"case_insensitive", ...


2

Add i in addition to the m after the last / in your pattern string: $pattern = "/^.*$pattern.*\$/mi"


0

Ultimately, a generic "contains" operation comes down to a function like this, /// <summary> /// Determines whether the source contains the sequence. /// </summary> /// <typeparam name="T">The type of the items in the sequences.</typeparam> /// <param name="sourceEnumerator">The source enumerator.</param> /// <param ...


0

I noticed that if the user enters a string of text but leaves the input without selecting any of the autocomplete options no value is set in the hidden input, even if the string coincides with one in the array. So, with help of the other answers I made this: var $local_source = [{ value: 1, label: "c++" }, { value: 2, ...


0

A bit late, but this is pretty simple. Just use the "ILIKE" operator, e.g. User::where("email", "ILIKE", $email)->get();



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