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In python3 you can use list1.sort(key=lambda x: x.lower()) #Case In-sensitive list1.sort() #Case Sensitive


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Spring 4.2 will support case-insensitive path matching. You can configure it as follows: @Configuration public class WebConfig extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter { @Override public void configurePathMatch(PathMatchConfigurer configurer) { AntPathMatcher matcher = new AntPathMatcher(); matcher.setCaseSensitive(false); ...


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I feel like an idiot. All I had to do was add another lower() around the where clause in my SQL statement. Like this: select lower(USERNAME) as USERNAME, PASSWORD, ROLES, ALL_CUSTOMER_ACCESS from COMPANYNAME_USERS where lower(USERNAME) = lower(:username)


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You can use template.Funcs() to register custom functions that you want to use in your templates. There is a strings.EqualFold() function which performs case insensitive comparison of strings. So just register that function and you can call it from the template: t := template.Must(template.New("").Funcs(template.FuncMap{ "MyEq": strings.EqualFold, ...


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You can simply create another lowercase variable s1 := strings.ToLower(s) and to compare it with your template against a lowercase string.


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In your setUsername you could just have the text changed to lowercase like.. public function setUsername($username) { $this->username = mb_strtolower($username); return $this; } For reference, FOSUserBundle handles this by "canonicalizing" the username (to usernameCanonical) and email address (to canonicalEmail) in the updateUser call (see ...


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Did you try to convert the input into lowercase using CSS ? There are actually ways to control data input before it is handed to the login_check controller, but if you want a quick fix : p { text-transform: lowercase; }


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maybe the easiest way: awk '{$0=tolower($0);n=$1;$1="";a[$0]+=n}END{for(i in a){print a[i], i}}' file


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From AWK Manual One way to perform a case-insensitive match at a particular point in the program is to convert the data to a single case, using the tolower() or toupper() built-in string functions (which we haven’t discussed yet; see String Functions). For example: tolower($1) ~ /foo/ { … } Another method, specific to gawk, is to set the variable ...


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Use a case-insensitive collation, such as: ORDER BY Diaries COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci ; However, changing collation on-the-fly, like any convertion on-the-fly, makes the query unable to use an index (which is acceptable if the data set to be sorted is small enough). If performance is an issue then you had better reindex the column with the target ...


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You can use COLLATE with xxx_ci where ci means case insensitive. For example: SELECT * FROM Diaries ORDER BY title COLLATE 'latin1_general_ci' ASC; There's more information regarding case sensitivity in MySQL here: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/case-sensitivity.html. It's useful for doing searches and comparisons as well.


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In SQL, you can use the lower() or upper() functions in the order by: ORDER BY lower(Diaries), diaries


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I'd be thinking in terms of: Loop through the number of possibilities. (2^length). Print the 'count' in binary, because that gives a bit mask. Use that bit mask to flip the bits on each iteration. Something like this: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; my $string = "abcde"; for my $mask ( 0 .. 2**length($string) - 1 ) { my @bits = ...


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If you're aiming to use if for glob anyway then you can use glob's built-in pattern generation my $filename = 'File.CSV'; my $test = $filename =~ s/([a-z])/sprintf '{%s,%s}', uc($1), lc($1)/iegr; say $test, "\n"; say for glob $test; output {F,f}{I,i}{L,l}{E,e}.{C,c}{S,s}{V,v} FILE.CSV FILE.CSv FILE.CsV FILE.Csv FILE.cSV FILE.cSv FILE.csV FILE.csv ...


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Yes, topics and subscriptions are all case sensitive.


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Something like this with the custom raw lowercased sub-field: { "settings": { "analysis": { "analyzer": { "my_keyword_lowercase_analyzer": { "type": "custom", "tokenizer": "keyword", "filter": [ "lowercase" ] } } } }, "mappings": { "myindex": { ...



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