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Here is my solution which does not allocate any heap memory, therefore it should be significantly faster than most of the other implementations mentioned here. public static int indexOfIgnoreCase(final String haystack, final String needle) { if (needle.isEmpty() || haystack.isEmpty()) { // Fallback to legacy ...


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Let's assume you're using a pattern like this: pattern = (?<prefix>.*)(?<toChange>[Cc])(?<rest>[loau])(?<suffix>.*) You can simply build a new string that would consist of (pseudo-code): replacementString = ${prefix} + changedCharConvertedToString + ${rest} + ${suffix} where changedCharConvertedToString is a captured ${toChange} ...


1

C:\ProgramData has has security settings that prevent standard user from writing there. This is not new in Windows 8, Windows 7 was the same, and the equivalent folder on Vista is also secured in this way. Perhaps your Windows 7 environment of UAC has not disabled, or perhaps you have secured C:\ProgramData or C:\ProgramData\MyProgramName to permit write ...


0

SQL server determines case sensitivity by COLLATION. COLLATION can be set at various levels. Server-level Database-level Column-level Expression-level Here is the MSDN reference. One can check the COLLATION at each level as mentioned in Raj More's answer. Check Server Collation SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('COLLATION') Check Database Collation SELECT ...


1

It's not a bug, there's just no standard and it's up the folks implementing which to use (or to make it case-insensitive). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexadecimal There is no universal convention to use lowercase or uppercase for the letter digits, and each is prevalent or preferred in particular environments by community standards or convention. ...


3

In your code, essentially, you're incrementing the counter unconditionally. if(c==d || c==ch) ^ ^ | | UPPERCASE original will increment the counter for both the cases. As the code is currently written . for an input of a or A, c is always A, so When a is read from file, d is A, so, c==d gives TRUE, increments ...


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Okay, I "solved" the problem. In fact it was kind of my own stupidity (sorry for that!). Previously I added the idea.properties file to the AndroidStudio- and AndroidStudioBeta-directories. I did not do the same for AndroidStudioPreview1.2 because I thought that it is not a preview anymore (Android Studio > About Android Studio says it is Beta) but since I ...


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There are at least two quick ways you can solve this. 1. You specify a case-sensitive collation (rules for comparing strings across characters in a character set) for A.Code and B.Code. In MySQL and a few other database management systems, the default collation is case-insensitive. That is, assuming that you're using MySQL or similar, you'll have to ...


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Using UPPER() function should work SELECT Code, BrandName, Count(*) QTY, SUM(Price) TOTAL FROM A INNER JOIN B ON UPPER(A.Code)=UPPER(B.Code) GROUP BY Code, BrandName


3

Since you use a collation that is case insensitive and want to differentiate on case try using the collate keyword with a suitable case-sensitive collation: INNER JOIN B ON A.Code COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS_KS_WS = B.Code COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS_KS_WS


1

Windows’ file system is mostly case-insensitive, so you cannot rename a file by just changing its capitalization. Instead, you will have to use a temporary name in between. Try the following from the command line: git mv FOOBar.java FooBar.java.new git mv FooBar.java.new FooBar.java git commit -m 'Rename file'


1

You should specify the case sensitive collation next to the part to be replaced. Second REPLACE should then be applied on the result of the previous REPLACE: DECLARE @urlReturn NVARCHAR(3072) SET @urlReturn = REPLACE(@url ,'Á' COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS ,'%c3%81' ) SET @urlReturn = REPLACE( @urlReturn ,'á','%c3%a1') SELECT @urlReturn


3

Select the option "use a formula" and enter =EXACT(A1,"dd") where A1 is the first cell in the area where you're applying your CF



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