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You could add abort statement on the OnDestroy event: public class MeldingssystemServiceInstaller : IWindsorInstaller { public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store) { container.Register(Component.For<IMeldingssystemService>() .AsWcfClient(new ...


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Two years too late, but here's a test. public class DependsOnSomethingDisposable { private readonly SomethingDisposable _disposable; public Boolean SomethingDisposableIsDisposed { get { return _disposable.Disposed; } } public DependsOnSomethingDisposable(SomethingDisposable disposable) { _disposable = disposable; } } public ...


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In your test class, create a field. private WindsorContainer Container; (replace the existing static field.) Then, add this to your test class: [TestInitialize] public void SetUp() { Container = new WindsorContainer(); // register your dependencies } [TestCleanup] public void Cleanup() { Container.Dispose(); } [TestInitialize] runs before ...


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I realized that I had used Classes.From(Type[] ...) in my code rather than Classes.FromThisAssembly as in the example. Apparently it won't scan multiple assemblies to find basedon implementations. I also found that it won't scan multiple assemblies to find internal implementations but that's a side note.


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Two years later, but I have a more elegant solution for other people that stummble accross this problem too. It is possible to use TypedFactory facility and adapt it to you needs like here. first create the factory interface (only! no need for the actual implementation, castle will take care of that): public interface IHubProxyFactory { IHubProxy ...


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You can use Castle's Typed Factory Facility to achieve this. First you need to create an interface that Castle will implement: public interface IFactory { ICar<TEntity> CreateCar<TEntity>(ConnectionDetails connectionDetails); IBoat<TEntity> CreateBoat<TEntity>(ConnectionDetails connectionDetails); void Release(object ...


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Personally I find that factories mixed with dependency injection can be a bit of anti-pattern, since it hides implementation/creation details somewhere other than the object graph root. In addition, when mixing the two it becomes unclear who ultimately has the responsibility for creating and maintaining objects and their lifecycles. I'd recommend you move ...


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By default if you create a new instance of HttpClient for each call, then each call will create a new TCP connection, and this will cause latency and reduced throughput. If you want to have a new HttpClient instance because it's got per-call data on it, then you can have a singleton HttpClientHandler, pass it to the HttpClient ctor, and that will share the ...


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I would use LifestyleTransient to create a new one for each request. That's safest when you're not sure that the class can function as a singleton. It's also not a bad idea to depend on an abstraction (an interface) rather than on the HttpClient directly unless you're certain that the class would never be used apart from making HTTP requests. Even then it ...


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In the end, just went with adding it in each Global.asax, would have been nice to have it in a library but perhaps simplicity over reuse is the best option.


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According to the Castle Windsor documentation you can implement your own custom scope. You have to implement the Castle.MicroKernel.Lifestyle.Scoped.IScopeAccessor interface. You then specify your scope accessor when registering your component: Container.Register(Component.For<MyScopedComponent>().LifestyleScoped<OwinWebRequestScopeAccessor ...


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Enqueuing is straight forward: public void Intercept(IInvocation invocation) { queue.Enqueue(invocation.Proceed); ... } But this is pretty pointless since you will have to wait until the delegate is dequeued and invoked before returning from your Intercept() method.


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Thanks guys. I've build a little working test using ISubDependencyResolver. But as @Phil mentioned this is a bad idea. So I'll go another way.


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You want to create your own IHandlerSelector. This interface is used by Windsor to allow you to control which service is selected when Windsor tries to resolve a component. Here's some pseudo code of what you could do (sorry for the C# -- I don't have any VB.NET code sample lying around): public class AddressServiceSelector : IHandlerSelector { public ...


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After more detailed search I found that it was common problem with bindings. I had to move all binding configuration from WcfServiceWrappers app.config to APIs web.config, so now all service clients can see their binding configuration which is needed in constructor.


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We didn't release a new version of Windsor with a Serilog member in the enumeration, however if you look at the implementation of LoggingFacility you'll see that the enumeration members (e.g. log4net) just get loaded by reflection. You can easily use LogUsing<>() to provide the SerilogFactory provided by Castle Core: var container = new ...


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How about using InstallerFactory to alter the order? public class AppFirstFactory: InstallerFactory { public override IEnumerable<Type> Select(IEnumerable<Type> installerTypes) { return installerTypes.OrderBy(x => x.Assembly == GetType().Assembly ? 0 : 1); } } Then to register: ...


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Note the disclaimer at the top of your linked article: Prefer UsingFactoryMethod over this facility: while the facility provides programmatic API it is deprecated and its usage is discouraged and won't be discussed here. Recommended approach is to use UsingFactoryMethod method of fluent registration API to create components. This limits the usefulness of ...


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Rebuilt latest master with updates and work arounds to build issues noted in the fork's readme. https://github.com/johnEsacks/Castle.Facilities.NHibernate



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