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16

The NHibernate team won't support those bytecode providers any more. It hasn't been officially voted, but I don't think the Castle team will support it either. Fortunately, this is all open source, so you can just go ahead and grab the code and maintain it and put it on NuGet. It could be either a NHibernate contrib or a Castle contrib project. Still, if ...


11

Someting like this? container.Register(AllTypes.FromAssemblyContaining<YourClass>() .BasedOn(typeof(IFoo<,>)) .WithService.AllInterfaces() .Configure(c => c.LifeStyle.Transient)); interface public interface IFoo<T, U> { T IToo(); U ISeeU(); }


10

[Update] This is now possible in Windsor 2.1 or newer. See the documentation for syntax here. This feature has not been implemented in the XML interpreter as of yet.. however it is not difficult to add support for it via a facility (obviously this technique is also useful when wanting to add other features absent from the existing configuration parser). ...


10

And so I finally got some time and worked out that all I needed to do was to add the following to AssemblyInfo.cs: [assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("DynamicProxyGenAssembly2")]


10

This is a bit tricky. Take a look at documentation on how proxies work. Interface proxies wrap an object and intercept calls to designated interface(s). Since Equals is not part of that interface the second call to equals is comparing proxies, not their targets. So what provides the implementation for the second Equals call? Proxy is just another class ...


9

NHibernate 3.2 has introduced quite a number of undocumented breaking changes, particularly for those folks previously using the Castle bytecode provider.


9

In your test you could subscribe to the ComponentModelCreated event and change the lifestyle of your per-web-request components to something else. (example). If you're writing an integration test with the scope of a single request, singleton should do. If you're writing an integration test that spans multiple requests, you could use a contextual ...


8

Always remember that in the application code, pulling from the container is never the solution. Application code should be unaware that there's a DI container in play. The general solution when you need to resolve a dependency based on a run-time value is to use an Abstract Factory. In your case, the factory might look like this (assuming that your config ...


8

type.Assembly.FullName.StartsWith("DynamicProxyGenAssembly2")


7

Yes, it is worth using ActiveRecord over just plain NHibernate, as it greatly simplifies configuration.


7

I agree with Krzysztof that this is usually not a good idea... However as far as I can tell OverWrite() does not overwrite the default component, it just overwrites the lifestyle defined by attribute (i.e. [Singleton]). If you want to replace a component, you can use container.Kernel.RemoveComponent(string key) followed by the registration of the new ...


7

NHibernate uses proxy objects to achieve lazy loading and uses the Castle DynamicProxy module. This is the reason your entity properties need to be virtual. Because NHibernate creates proxy classes that intercept calls to your properties.


7

That's exactly the way to do it. See "Type Forwarding" in the docs. It registers one logical component accessible via IHomeViewModel or IPageViewModel. The following test passes: public interface IHomeViewModel {} public interface IPageViewModel {} public class HomeViewModel: IHomeViewModel, IPageViewModel {} [Test] public void Forward() { var ...


7

You could add a handler selector, which would be able to select between available implementations depending on e.g. whether Thread.CurrentPrincipal was set (or HttpContext.Current.Request.IsAuthenticated in ASP.NET/MVC if I remember correctly). The handler selector would probably look somewhat like this: public class MyAuthHandlerSelector : ...


7

First of all, how do you know the decommision concerns associated with an object which you did not create? You do not have control over the creation of the object because you did not create it yourself (the factory did this for you). When you combine ioc resolving with consumer disposing (calling .Dispose instead of factory.Release) you are introducing the ...


7

Problem can be solved using assembly binding - App.config: <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1"> <dependentAssembly> <assemblyIdentity name="Castle.Core" publicKeyToken="407dd0808d44fbdc" /> <bindingRedirect oldVersion="1.0.0.0-2.5.0.0" newVersion="2.5.1.0" /> </dependentAssembly> ...


7

You are using the Service Locator pattern, where you register services, pass around a reference to the container, and explicitly call resolve all over you code. If you take a quick tour through the Castle Windsor wiki, they discourage this use of the container. Generally, you should register all your types (via installers), resolve only one root object ...


7

The last versions of NHibernate do not require configuring a proxy factory. An internal one is used by default and the old adapters are not part of the project anymore.


7

You could very simply do this in the place you need to override the default implementation. This is an example from our integration tests. Both implementations are now registered but your code will use the default one, which is the one you've just registered. Works like a bomb and doesn't have any impact on the rest of the application: var ...


6

You mean something like this? container.Register(Component.For(typeof(IRepository<>)) .ImplementedBy(typeof(Repository<>)) .LifeStyle.Transient);


6

In the huge majority of cases you shouldn't have to explicitly register a constructor argument. The auto-wiring feature should be able to take care of that for you automatically. This will make your code less brittle and thus more maintainable. So, the best you can do is simply to register MyConfiguration with the container. If this there's only a single ...


6

Yes, always dispose the ISession. See the docs on ISessionManager usage. For transactions, consider using the Automatic Transaction Facility. The SessionManager is ATM-aware so it will dispose the ISession smartly when it needs to, taking transactions into account, even when you apparently have disposed the ISession. Here's a quick & dirty sample app ...


5

Part of what felt weird to me about using ActiveRecord was having to inherit from ActiveRecordBase<T>, and having all those persistence methods on your object (Save and so forth). But it turns out you don't have to! Instead of having, say: [ActiveRecord] class Customer : ActiveRecordBase<Customer> { } You can just have [ActiveRecord] class ...


5

You need to wrap the code in a session scope, like this: using(new SessionScope()) { a.Save(); b.Save(); c.Save(); } Read more here.


5

OK.. got it working. The version of a NHibernate that I have requires to have "hibernate" in the key attributes. example Instead of this: <add key="connection.driver_class" value="NHibernate.Driver.SqlClientDriver"/> do like this: <add key="hibernate.connection.driver_class" value="NHibernate.Driver.SqlClientDriver" /> ...


5

CreationContext.AdditionalParameters has the values you pass to Resolve


5

No, it is not every time the user requests a page. The IoC container should be configured once for the lifetime of the application (in your global Application_Start event handler, for instance) and then shouldn't require any additional configuration while the application runs.


5

Castle had an AOP framework called Aspect# (or AspectSharp) that implemented AOP with its terminology (advice, pointcuts, join-points, etc), but that project died years ago. The core of it, what really enabled AOP, Castle DynamicProxy, survived and evolved. Documentation and resources to learn about DynamicProxy, including projects using it and ...


5

I know this is old, but what I've done to fix the dependency problem is simple: In my UnitOfWork I added one static method: private static void bringCastleDamnit() { var pf = new NHibernate.ByteCode.Castle.ProxyFactoryFactory(); } Then, and only then, would MSBuild see that it was needed and copy it to my output directory for my (asp.net and console) ...


5

The NHibernate session encapsulates a unit of work as specified by the unit of work pattern.



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