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55

In Lisp, a linked list element is called a CONS. It is a data structure with two elements, called the CAR and the CDR for historical reasons. (Some Common Lisp programmers prefer to refer to them using the FIRST and REST functions, while others like CAR and CDR because they fit well with the precomposed versions such as (CADR x) ≡ (CAR (CDR x)). The joke is ...


18

Yes, definitely a geek joke. The names come from the IBM 704, but that's not the joke. The joke is (bad) pun on "my other car is a ___." But the in-joke is about recursion. When you loop/manipulate/select/invoke/more in lisp you use a combination of car (the first element in the list) and cdr (the rest of the list) to juggle functions. So you've got a ...


15

Your mistake is that cdr[(B C)] is the list (C), not the atom C. Then car[(C)] is C.


11

The best architecture would be to use distributed nodes(Server) i.e. PBX,web server & DB server in different nodes. PBX will populate your CDR table(this must be in a DB server) after every call, you can fetch these records from your web server for your reporting & billing purpose. Using Cron to Sync DB table is not recommended as it will eat up the ...


10

//Coming from Scheme Scheme has very few data structures, one of them is a tuple: '(first . second). In this case, car is the first element, and cdr is the second. This construct can be extended to create lists, trees, and other structures. The joke isn't very funny.


9

The ' character is just an abbreviation: 'something is expanded at read time to (quote something). Therefore: (cdar '('(fee fi) '(fo fum))) is actually: (cdar (quote ((quote (fee fi)) (quote (fo fum))))) The first quote prevents evaluation of its contents, so the rest of them are just literal lists and symbols, so a more useful representation would be: ...


7

When applied to a proper list, cdr will always return another list (including '(), the empty list). With proper list I mean a list which ends with the empty list. For instance, when you do this (define lst '(4 5)) under the hood this is what gets assigned to lst: (cons 4 (cons 5 '())), so when you evaluate (cdr lst) you get the second element of the first ...


7

Um, it shouldn't. (cdr x) should give you '((NOT (NOT (NOT A)))). Which means (NOT (NOT (NOT A))) is the first element of (cdr x). When you cdr again it's on a one-element list, so you get nil '()


6

(cdr '(b c)) is the list (c), not the atom c, so the expression becomes (car '(c)) not (car c) ? (cdr '(b c)) (C) ? (car '(c)) C


6

In terms of what they do, car and cdr are equivalent to first and rest. This is quite clear in the documentation. The HyperSpec says on the entry for first, second, &c: The functions first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, and tenth access the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, and ...


5

This is a great place to use Seq.fold. It collapses a collection down into a single value. Cartesian keys1 keys2 |> Seq.fold (fun map (i, j) -> let value = (inputd.[i]).[j] Map.add (i, j) value map) Map.empty


5

Cartesian keys1 keys2 |> Seq.map (fun (i, j) -> ((i, j), (inputd.[i]).[j])) |> Map.ofSeq


5

As a complement to the previous answers, if you want to be able to pattern-match sequences, you can define an active pattern: let (|Cons|Nil|) s = if Seq.isEmpty s then Nil else Cons(Seq.head s, Seq.skip 1 s) let rec addentry map keys = match keys with | Cons((i,j), tail) -> Map.add (i,j) ((inputd.[i]).[j]) (addentry ...


4

Your friends are the functions eq and equal. eq compares for physical identity while equal checks whether the objects "look alike". In your case: (defvar a (list 1 2 3)) (defvar b (cons 1 (cdr a))) (equal a b) ==> t (eq a b) ==> nil (eq (cdr a) (cdr b)) ==> t EDIT: note that list is equivalent to a few cons calls: (list x y) == (cons x (cons y ...


3

Basically you have car, cadr, caddr, ... to get the first, second, third element, ... A list is a linked list where cons has a value in it's car and the rest of the list in it's cdr. '(a b c d) is the same as '(a . (b . (c . (d)))) and you can make it with (cons a (cons b (cons c (cons d '())))). cdr of it would be (b . (c . (d))) and car of that again ...


3

There is one that might help you get what you are looking for: func dropFirst<Seq : Sliceable>(s: Seq) -> Seq.SubSlice Use like this: let a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 18, 9, 10] let b = dropFirst(a) // [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 18, 9, 10]


3

Short answer: the first version of reverse is incorrectly building an improper list, the second version is inefficiently building a proper list. We can do better as long as we understand the difference between append and cons. append concatenates two lists. If we use it for just adding an element at the end of one list, we'll be doing a lot more of work ...


3

If you read the documentation string for nthcdr, you'll see that it just returns a pointer to the "nth" "cdr" - which is a pointer into the original list. So you're modifying the original list. Doc string: Take cdr N times on LIST, return the result. Edit Wow, "pointer" seems to stir up confusion. Yes, Lisp has pointers. Just look at the box diagrams ...


3

R: "Look, in the sky! The Lambda Signal! A citizen is in trouble Lambda Man!" LM: "I see it! And I've got just the box art they need." In Lisps, lists are singly-linked data structures, comprised of elements called cons cells. Each of these cells is a structure that consists of a pointer to a value a pointer to the next cell These are called the ...


3

dst is the extension where your call lands


2

Using a separate database server to store your CDR's is the correct option for anything but a hobby Asterisk implementation. Asterisk makes it easy to select a destination database for your CDR's and has a myriad of different database options: MySQL, Postgresql. MSSQL etc. The Asterisk CDR implementation only uses a single table so it's actually a very ...


2

;; '(6 4 2 3) is actually (cdr '((1 9 8 5) (6 4 2 3))) No. Try it. (caar '(6 4 2 3) (caadr '(6 4 2 3)) That's not valid Lisp. Lisp will also not 'crash'. It will just signal an error. SBCL also is not an interpreter. It uses a compiler.


2

(caar '(6 4 2 3)) signals an error cause you are trying to do (car 6), and 6 is not a list. Inside your function, you dont have (caar '(6 4 2 3)), but(caar '((6 4 2 3))). Look how cdr works: (cdr '((1 9 8 5) (6 4 2 3)))) => '((6 4 2 3)), not '(6 4 2 3) So... (caar '((6 4 2 3))) => 6, and (car '(6 4 2 3)) => 6 Do you see your mistake?


2

I've tried rewriting your example a bit - this seems to work for me without blowing the stack. class MyList(object): def __init__(self, *xs): self._x = xs if all(xs) else tuple() self.head = xs[0] if xs else None @property def is_empty(self): return not self._x @property def tail(self): return ...


2

The cdr will show dst="s" when the context where the call lands has no other matching extension. This is sometimes used as an extension of last resort as described Asterisk+s+extension. The article also mentions the use of the s extension in macros which is also a possible reason. Depending on how you setup Asterisk, you may not realize that your calls are ...


2

And where are the functions being called? And you have two parameters called x, they must have different names. Try this: (define (max f) ; you must use a different parameter name (lambda (x) (if (> ((car f) x) ((cdr f) x)) ; actually call the functions ((car f) x) ((cdr f) x)))) Now it'll work as expected: ...


2

You can download DrRacket here: http://download.racket-lang.org/ DrRacket allows you to edit and run programs easily.


2

You can just get DIALSTATUS variable,that is enought for you application and will be supported in future releases. pbx_builtin_getvar_helper(chan, "DIALSTATUS");


1

Classically, car and cdr have been more machine oriented while first and rest have been more abstract functions. In reality, there is no difference between them. Everyone stuck to car and cdr, so car and cdr prevailed. If you're having a hard time to finding any differences between car and first, it's because there is none. Look at first as an alias for ...


1

The operations first and rest signals that you are working with a list: a series of pairs ending with the empty list i.e. it is of the form (list x1 ... xn) The operations car and cdr signals that you are working on a data structure build with pairs, that potentially isn't a list. That is choose first and rest when you work with lists, to make the code ...



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