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24

Your percentage isn't actually 0.05. It's a value close to 0.05... and probably a little bit more than 0.05. Thus when it's multiplied by 2600, you're getting a value just over 130.0... which is then being "ceilinged" to 131.0. Using a little tool I wrote a while ago (available from this page about .NET binary floating point types) it looks like the actual ...


22

num = Math.ceil(num * 100) / 100; Though, due to the way floats are represented, you may not get a clean number that's to two decimal places. For display purposes, always do num.toFixed(2).


22

Why use external script languages? You get floor by default. To get ceil, do $ divide=8; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result 3 $ divide=9; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result 3 $ divide=10; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result 4 $ divide=11; by=3; let result=($divide+$by-1)/$by; echo $result 4 $ divide=12; by=3; ...


20

double has a greater value range than int: The Double value type represents a double-precision 64-bit number with values ranging from negative 1.79769313486232e308 to positive 1.79769313486232e308, as well as positive or negative zero, PositiveInfinity, NegativeInfinity, and Not-a-Number (NaN). Double complies with the IEC 60559:1989 ...


13

Call out to a scripting language with a ceil function. Given $NUMBER: python -c "from math import ceil; print ceil($NUMBER/500.0)" or perl -w -e "use POSIX; print ceil($NUMBER/500.0), qq{\n}"


12

The documentation says about the return value: The smallest whole number greater than or equal to a. If a is equal to NaN, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity, that value is returned. Therefore the return value has to be double since NaN, NegativeInfinity and PositiveInfinity are fields of Double.


12

Generate a random number from 0 to 25 and add 75. :)


11

Why would you want to convert everything to double? I would use: total = decimal.Ceiling(quantity.Value * days.Value * multiplier.Value); (You could use Math.Ceiling(decimal) instead, but I feel it's clearer that it's using decimal if you use decimal.Ceiling.) Converting everything to double, performing the arithmetic there, and then converting back to ...


9

Actually I don't think you want to represent dollar amounts as float, due to the same reason cited by Box9. For example, 0.1*3 != 0.3 in my browser. It's better to represent them as integers (e.g. cents).


9

I don't know of any python function to do so, but you can easily code one : import math def ceil(x, s): return s * math.ceil(float(x)/s) The conversion to float is necessary in python 2 to avoid the integer division if both arguments are integers. You can also use from __future__ import division. This is not needed with python 3.


9

The default rounding mode of DecimalFormat which is been used by <fmt:formatNumber> is RoundingMode.HALF_EVEN. There is no way to change that by some tag attribute. Just add 0.5 to the value to make it to behave like RoundingMode.CEILING. <fmt:formatNumber value="${bean.number + 0.5}" type="number" pattern="#" />


6

int randomNum = (int) Math.ceil(Math.random() * 25) + 75;


6

I don't see that you need to use anything like that: int zeroBasedRow = row - 1; int side = ((zeroBasedRow / 3) % 2) + 1; Test code: using System; class Test { static void Main(string[] args) { for (int row = 1; row <= 12; row++) { int zeroBasedRow = row - 1; int side = ((zeroBasedRow / 3) % 2) + 1; ...


6

"Microsoft Excel's ceiling function does not follow the mathematical definition, but rather as with (int) operator in C, it is a mixture of the floor and ceiling function: for x ≥ 0 it returns ceiling(x), and for x < 0 it returns floor(x). This has followed through to the Office Open XML file format. For example, CEILING(-4.5) returns -5. A mathematical ...


6

The reason you're getting 255undefined is that you are not passing a replacement value to the replace function along with the regex. Why not just do: function ceilingAbsolute(inVal, pos){ var digits = Math.pow(10, pos); return parseInt(inVal / digits) * digits; }


5

Math.Ceiling can return either a double or a decimal, depending on the type passed in. In other words, the output type of the method matches the input type (quite sensibly). They could have added a third overload that takes an int and returns an int, but there wouldn't have been much point to this - the function would always just return its input. You ...


5

This should be the answer, from php.net comments: // MS Excel function: Ceiling( number, significance ) // duplicates m$ excel's ceiling function if( !function_exists('ceiling') ) { function ceiling($number, $significance = 1) { return ( is_numeric($number) && is_numeric($significance) ) ? ...


4

This is a result of the floating point representation of the numbers involved. See the wikipedia. Probably 0.05 has an infinite base 2 representation as a double, so the value Math.Ceiling actually sees might be slightly larger than 130.


4

Mod the number with one to get the decimal part, if its >0.5, round up, else round down OR Divide the number by 0.5, if its odd, round up, else round down


4

Generate a number between 0 and 25 and then add 75.


4

Say you want to allocate memory in chunks (think: cache lines, disk sectors); how much memory will it take to hold an integral number of chunks that will contain the X bytes? If the chuck size is Y, then the answer is: CEILING(X,Y)


4

When you use an integer division in C like this y = a / b you get a result of division rounded towards zero, i.e. 5 / 2 == 2, -5 / 2 == -2. Sometimes it's desirable to round it another way so that 5 / 2 == 3, for example, if you want to take minimal integer array size to hold n bytes, you would want n / sizeof(int) rounded up, because you want space to ...


4

It should work with the ROUND function, no? Just divide your value by 2.5, round it to the nearest integer and multiply it again by 2.5


4

After dividing 9 by 2 a decimal fraction is Truncated to its integer part - 4, not Rounded to 5. Try: SELECT 9/2 Resilt is 4. Then CEILING(4) = 4 To get next integer declare variables as data types that can handle decimal part: NUMERIC,FLOAT, REAL.


3

This is apples vs. oranges. In most languages/APIs, min/max take two (or more) inputs, and return the smallest/biggest. floor/ceil take one argument, and round it up or down to the nearest integer.


3

I know this is answered already but correct answer did not have code snippet. So here is a little code snippet: int randomNum = 0; Random ran = new Random(); randomNum = ran.nextInt(25) + 75;


3

Do it between zero and 25 and add 75.


3

Once you have the fractional part of the number, the problem is pretty much solved. One way to get the fractional part is to repeatedly subtract powers-of-2 from you number (assuming it has been made positive, if it were negative to begin with). The function below, getWholeMaker, returns what you want (the "thing" that must be added to round the number). ...


3

If you can't use mod (because it might only be defined for integers in your language, you might be able to do something like this (in C-ish pseudocode): // make the input positive: boolean inputPositive = true; if (input < 0) { input = 0 - input; inputPositive = false; } // subtract 1 until you just have the decimal portion: int integerPart = 0; ...


3

Here's a solution using bc (which should be installed just about everywhere): ceiling_divide() { ceiling_result=`echo "($1 + $2 - 1)/$2" | bc` } Here's another purely in bash: # Call it with two numbers. # It has no error checking. # It places the result in a global since return() will sometimes truncate at 255. # Short form from comments (thanks: ...



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