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5

It looks like the Element class isn't being exposed directly by the C implementation. However you can use this trick: >>> Element = type(xml.etree.cElementTree.Element(None)) >>> root = xml.etree.cElementTree.fromstring('<xml></xml>') >>> isinstance(root, Element) True


4

You need to use: t = ET.fromstring(response.read())


4

The equivalent library that you should be using is lxml. lxml is a wrapper on very fast c libraries libxml2 and libxslt and is generally considered superior to the built in ones. It, luckly, tries to keep to the element tree api and extend it in lxml.etree. lxml.etree has an attribute sourceline for all elements which is just what you are after. So ...


4

You've run into the bug recently documented in Issue 14246. Until it is fixed, one workaround for Python 3 is to change sys.stdin to be a byte stream rather than a string stream: import sys import xml.etree.cElementTree as ET sys.stdin = sys.stdin.detach() tree = ET.parse(sys.stdin)


3

parent_map = dict((c, p) for p in tree.getiterator() for c in p) parent_map[el].remove(el)


3

As TJD mentioned, comparing XMLs in size only may not be very informative. However, I happen to have files of the same structure but different size: With a 79M file: $ python -m timeit -n 1 -c 'from xml.etree.cElementTree import iterparse count = 0 for event, elem in iterparse("..../QT20060217_S_18mix23-2500_01.mzML"): if elem.tag.endswith("spectrum"): ...


3

Iterating over a Element object yields just one element at a time, but your loop is expecting two values. You are confusing .fromstring() with .iterparse() here. You really just need .findall(): tree = ET.fromstring(xml) for elem in tree.findall('.//*'): if elem.text and elem.text.strip() == 'error': print elem.tag or .iter(), which does the ...


3

Is this what you are looking for? import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET et = ET.parse('xml/test.xml') for child in et.getroot(): for core in child: core_value = str(core.text) core.text = core_value.decode('unicode-escape') et.write('output.xml')


3

It seems you can get access to the parent from the child using version 1.3 of ElementTree (check http://effbot.org/zone/element-xpath.htm), by using xpath commands like child.find('../parent'). But I think python ships with version 1.2 or something. You should also check for lxml which is compatible with etree and has full Xpath support http://lxml.de/


2

"simple string methods" are the root [pun intended] of all evil -- see examples below. Update 2 Code and output now show that proposed regexes also don't work very well. Use ElementTree. The function that you are looking for is iterparse. Enable "start" events. Bale out on the first iteration. Code: # coding: ascii import xml.etree.cElementTree as et # ...


2

Please explain what "does not work" means to you. What I guess is the code that you ran (or should have ran) worked for me (Python 2.x for x in (5, 6)) -- see below. It even worked on Python 2.1 with the appropriate change to the import statement. Note that I displayed element.tag to show that it is referring to the desired element. >>> xml = """\ ...


2

You can do this with lxml. It has getparent(). Alternatively, it's possible to handle start and end events and skip feature children with cElementTree: from xml.etree import cElementTree as etree in_feature_tag = False for event, element in etree.iterparse('test.xml', events=('start', 'end')): if element.tag == 'feauture': in_feature_tag = ...


2

You can use XPath paths on the findall method: The 1.2 release supports simple element location paths. In its simplest form, a location path is one or more tag names, separated by slashes (/). You can also use an asterisk (*) instead of a tag name, to match all elements at that level. For example, */subtag returns all subtag ...


2

This question is perhaps the Python equivalent of "My friend has a fast car and I just have a clunker. How can I make my car go as fast as hers?" I'm not saying this couldn't be done, but I should call call such an enterprise either ambitious or foolhardy, depending on your level of programming skill. The point is that each system has, as you have ...


2

instead of response.read() t = ET.parse(response) r = t.getroot() try resp = response.read() t = ET.fromstring(resp) r = t.getroot() or t = ET.fromstring(response.read()) r = t.getroot() Also, you should note that not all HTML is parsable as XML. If your request returns XHTML then you will be fine, but otherwise you will get a very similar error to ...


2

There are two problems on this line: a=tree.find('parent') First, <parent> is not an immediate child of the root element. <parent> is a grandchild of the root element. The path to parent looks like /project/grandparent/parent. To search for <parent>, try the XPath expression */parent or possiblly //parent. Second, ...


2

You're looking for a child, not an attribute, so it's simplest to analyze the title as it "passes by" in the iteration and remember the result until you get the end of the resulting page: import re good_page = False for event, elem in iter(etree.iterparse("/tmp/test.xml", events=('start','end'))): if event == 'end': if elem.tag = 'title': ...


2

You can only read once a response, because it is a file object like (in fact a addinfourl). Subsequent calls to read will return an empty string since you have always read the whole text. So either you do not call read before using ET.parse(response), or you store the result in a string and use it for ET : txt = response.read() # do what you want with txt ...


1

From the "What's New in Python 3.3" docs: The xml.etree.ElementTree module now imports its C accelerator by default; there is no longer a need to explicitly import xml.etree.cElementTree (this module stays for backwards compatibility, but is now deprecated). In addition, the iter family of methods of Element has been optimized (rewritten in C). The ...


1

This is most likely a reference issue. You have: for terms in term.iterfind('Term'): for term in terms: So term is a variable before any of the loops, but then you re-use that name in the inner for loop.


1

Assuming you are using Python3, the iterator syntax is next(context) instead of context.next()


1

Your code creates a whole new tree and adds Jay to it. You need to connect Jay to the existing tree, not to a new one. Try this: import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET tree = ET.parse("test.xml") a=tree.find('parent') # Get parent node from EXISTING tree b=ET.SubElement(a,"child") b.text="Jay/Doctor" tree.write("test.xml") If you want to search for ...


1

There's no reason to expect this to work. jterrace dug around in the internals of ElementTree and came up with a hacky worakround that acts directly on those internals. You're trying to use it on a different implementation, with different internals, so of course it's not going to work. But… if you look at the source to cElementTree, you can see that the ...


1

The document iterator returns Element, which can't be split into (event, element). You should remove 'event'. But that's not quite right either because the element iterator will only give you children (tag2, tag3, tag4). You need to call element.iter() to get all descendents. >>> for element in ET.fromstring(xml).iter(): ... if ...


1

If you enable start events, you can track ancestor nodes by using a stack. If you really mean to suppress all descendants of a <feature>, instead of just children, you can use a simple flag as demonstrated in another answer. You can use root.clear() to blow away all finished-with elements. Read this. Code: import xml.etree.cElementTree as et # ...


1

Have you looked at node.getiterator()?


1

As others have pointed out, lxml implements the ElementTree API, so you're safe starting out with ElementTree and migrating to lxml if you need better performance or more advanced features. The big advantage of using ElementTree, if it meets your needs, is that as of Python 2.5 it is part of the Python standard library, which cuts down on external ...


1

@zdmytriv The line soap_app_response = super(BaseSOAPWebService, self).__call__(environ, start_response) should look like soap_app_response = super(DjangoSoapApp, self).__call__(environ, start_response) then your example works.



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