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I have been developing a flask app that uses Celery, so here is what I have done that works for me: make_celery is defined in the same file where the app instance is created (looks like server.py in your case) My tasks are defined in a separate tasks.py which lives in the same directory as server.py. This is also where i instantiate my celery object (from ...


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Here is how I solved the problem myself. I like the solution so I am sharing the sample code if anyone else wants to see it. Also suggest me if there are problems with the approach First of all I wrote a wrapper that would allow me to call the celery task indirectly. This is what my tasks.py looks like now import celery _MOCK = False MOCK_QUEUE = [] def ...


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Have a look at the Mock library which allows to replace functions you don't want to be invoked with "mocks" which look sufficiently similar to the original functions to convince the calling code that it's invoking the "real thing". You can then check that the mock was actually invoked and with what parameters. Example: import mock def test_do_sth(): ...


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The only time when you are going to run into issues while using db with celery is when you use the database as backend for celery because it will continuously poll the db for tasks. If you use a normal broker you should not have issues.


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While requesting information from your database you are reading your database. And in your celery task your are writing data into your database. You can write only once at a time but read as many times as you want as there is no lock permission on database while reading.


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Celery has a ResultSet class to work with this, it has "join()" and "native_join()" methods to do that. There is a drawback as the doc says, the database backends does not implement the "native_join()" (these backends do implement it: amqp, Redis and cache), because of that the ResultSet could be a really expensive, similar to your current approach. By the ...


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Perhaps the documentation was written after you posted the question. The page at http://celery.readthedocs.org/en/latest/configuration.html provides the answer: A built-in periodic task will delete the results after [ the time set in the CELERY_TASK_RESULT_EXPIRES configuration directive ] ... The default is to expire after 1 day. For a typical Django ...


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In order to do that you need to implement some kind of "distributed lock", and easy an reliable approach to this issue is to use the django cache with memcached backend and set a "flag" in it when the task starts then just before it finish remove that flag. Other option is to use "redis" lock as "distributed lock". Example of using django cache memcached as ...


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You could use celery signals, functions that have been registered will be called before and after a task is executed, it is trivial to measure the time: from time import time from celery.signals import task_prerun, task_postrun d = {} @task_prerun.connect def task_prerun_handler(signal, sender, task_id, task, args, kwargs): d[task_id] = time() ...


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You're probably getting a circular import. You can fix it by doing one of these: Moving the import that is failing to the bottom of the file. Moving the import into the function that is using the import (not at the top level of the module). Reorganizing your modules so that both convert_task and server are importing from a third module which does not ...


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It is hard to debug such a bug without working code. Here is what i think it could be. Lets start here: http://celery.readthedocs.org/en/latest/_modules/celery/backends/base.html#BaseBackend.store_result def store_result(self, task_id, result, status, traceback=None, request=None, **kwargs): """Update task state and result.""" ...


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Which version of celery are you using? When you debugged you used "C_FAKEFORK=1 sh -x /etc/init.d/celeryd start" (with C_FAKEFORK=1) right? If you are using the version 3.x+ you dont need to use "manage.py celery" (djangp-celery) instead you have to use the "celery" command which come with celery itself. Take a look to this part of the doc documentation. ...


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The idea is to launch the long running task, when you execute one it returns an AsyncResult object you have to get the "task_id" and return it to the client. The client side (javascript) would make a GET request for example to /check_status/ and pass the "task_id" to the server. The server will ask celery using that task_id and return to the client if the ...


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As @user2097159 said its a good practice to keep the long running tasks in a dedicate queue. You sould do that by routing using "settings.CELERY_ROUTES" more info here If you could estimate how long a task can be running, I recommend to use soft_time_limit per task, you will be able to handle it. There is a gist from a talk I gave here Thanks!


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In order to process "scheduled" tasks you need to run "celery beat" as @user2097159 said. celery -A <project> beat -l debug To run workers for normal tasks (task you execute asynchronous) you need to launch a worker celery -A <project> worker -l debug -l meas log-level equals to debug, good for development. A good practice is to leave ...


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While this question is old, it's still high up on google results, so I just want to chime in to say that I noticed on python 3.4 64bit on windows the lzma zipfile is thread-safe; all others fail. with zipfile.ZipFile("test.zip", "w", zipfile.ZIP_LZMA) as zip: #do stuff in threads Note that you can't bind the same file with multiple zipfile.ZipFile ...


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Short answer: No, but... You have to use django. The scheduler's entries are instances of django models so you would have to setup djcelery app somehow (see this code: https://github.com/celery/django-celery/blob/master/djcelery/schedulers.py) Also you won't have the admin interface to add scheduler's entries. This is just a guess, but you can try setting ...


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Long running tasks aren't great but It's by no means appropriate to say they are bad. The best way to handle long running tasks is to create a queue for just those tasks and have them run on a separate worker then the short tasks.


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It sounds to me that your "active" field should be a method instead like this: from django.utils import timezone class Race(models.Model): start = models.DateTimeField() end = models.DateTimeField() def active(self): now = timezone.now() if self.start < now and now < self.end: return True return False ...


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In case anyone made the same easy to make mistake as I did: The tutorial doesn't say so explicitly, but the line app = Celery('tasks', backend='rpc://', broker='amqp://') is an EDIT of the line in your tasks.py file. Mine now reads: app = Celery('tasks', backend='rpc://', broker='amqp://guest@localhost//') When I run python from the command line I ...


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Assuming the following scenarios - You want to be Database independent Once a race ends it never start again, so once active is false it will never be true again. There are numerous ways you can set that true automatically depending on your need - If you need only when using the object, you can use a property - @property def active(self): return ...


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When creating task you need to specify the Exception which will be thrown inside task from billiard.exceptions import Terminated @task(throws=(Terminated,)) def task(): ...


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Looks like you are missing you [supervisord] section in your config file, but that is likely because you are not loading the main conf file see docs You should not start supervisord with -c and a conf.d file - the files in that folder are usually loaded automatically. Usually, the -c is reserved for when your have a conf you created elsewhere other than ...


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You must be looking for asyncio.as_completed(coros). It yields as and when the results are ready from different coroutines. It returns an iterator which yields - in the order in which they are completed. You might also want to see how it differs from asyncio.gather(*coros) which returns once everything submitted to it has fininshed import asyncio from ...


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Alternatively instead of running Beat inside your worker process (which the docs for 3.1.18 say is not recommended) you can run it dedicated in the background with celery beat -A testdjango --pidfile=/blah/beat.pid --detach Be sure to save the pidfile somewhere so you can also kill the process later.


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To automatically update a model field after a specific time, you can use Celery tasks. Step-1: Create a Celery Task We will first create a celery task called set_race_as_inactive which will set the is_active flag of the race_object to False after the current date is greater than the end_time of the race_object. This task will be executed by Celery only ...


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The redis python packages expects the response from the DEL action to always be an integer, which I assume is the count of deleted rows. The call to int happens in the last line (return self.response_callbacks[command_name](response, **options)) where self.response_callbacks['DEL'] is equal to int. As a workaround, you could subclass the ...


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So, after much googlig and frustrating debugging I found an old github issue. That claimed celery tasks were working only when launched with a worker, and not with beat. The user states Beat does not execute tasks, it just sends the messages. You need both a beat instance and a worker instance! So to launch the work and the beat instance with the same ...


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Are you sure its not working? The way we've configured your crontab it says "Only run once a day at 4:30". So if you ran that until it hit 4:30 I would expect it to execute properly. Can you change your schedule to be {} instead to have it run every minute as a basic test? I've added a crontab example to the examples here: ...


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Is the behaviour of writing successful task completion to the error log correct? No, its not. I am having same setup and logging is working fine. celery.log has task info [2015-07-23 11:40:07,066: INFO/MainProcess] Received task: foo[b5a6e0e8-1027-4005-b2f6-1ea032c73d34] [2015-07-23 11:40:07,494: INFO/MainProcess] Task ...


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If "the tasks are extremely important" you should use RabbitMQ broker instead of Redis.


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By default, Celery tasks silently fail on error output. It most likely throws an exception which you never seen. To be sure what's going to fail, put pdb (ipdb) breakpoint in task code, start celery worker on the foreground and step through the code line-by-line.


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Whatever test_check is, it does something that needs a request context. Since Celery tasks are not part of the HTTP request/response cycle, you need to set up a request context manually. with app.test_request_context(): test_check()


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Simplest way to achieve this is, setting worker concurrency to 1 so that only one task gets executed at a time. Route the tasks to a seperate queue. your_task.apply_async(foo, queue='bar') Then start your worker with concurency of one celery worker -Q bar -c 1 See also Celery - one task in one second


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You are looking for a mutex. For Celery, there is celery_mutex and celery_once. In particular, celery_once claims to be doing what you ask, but I do not have experience with it. You could also use the Python multiprocessing that has a global mutex implementation, or use a shared storage that you already have. If the tasks run on the same machine, the ...


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The closest Celery has to retrying is short lived sessions. The task is cleaning out un-read task results. If it's failing, you may see those results start to build up, but should be OK otherwise. You're right that there's very little documentation about it!


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celeryd is the old version of celery worker.You can use both.But prefer latest.Then error is in your syntax.Try this python manage.py celeryd --verbosity=2 --loglevel=DEBUG


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For someone returning to this post, This happens when the serializer defined in your celery runtime config is not able to process objects passed to the celery task. For example: if the config says JSON as required format and some Model object is supplied, above mentioned exception might be raised. (Q): Is it explicitly necessary to define these parameters ...


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Looks like the behaviour of batch tasks is significantly different from normal tasks. Batch tasks are not even emitting signals like task_success. Since you need to call completed task after get_price, You can call it directly from get_price itself. @a.task(base=Batches, flush_every=10, flush_interval=5) def get_price(requests): for request in ...


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This type of error will also occur if the function you are referencing sits in a file with a __main__ directive, ie: the file containing the function definition looks something like: def f(*args): ... some code here ... if __name__ == "__main__": ... some code here ... If this is the case, having the function definition sit in a file separate ...


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Use some kind of locking. If you can tolerate occasional failures then you could do a quick and dirty distributed locking using something like memcached or redis. Or, as you say, your database. I don't know if I'd even bother locking rows in the database - personally I'd use Redis and just create a mapping www.whatever.com:username:hash(password) -> ...


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I had trouble getting upstart to run celery workers - in fact upstart never quite managed to live up to its promise. I would recommend using supervisord instead of upstart to manage the celery workers - example config file: /etc/supervisor.d/celery.conf [program:celery] command=celery worker --app=path.to.my.tasks user=celery autostart=true ...


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It seems the worker is not the issue here, rather it seems RabbitMQ is closing the connection which the worker consumes. Check RabbitMQ/queue itself settings. Perhaps a proxy in the middle?


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Meanwhile, I have solved my problem by replacing the following: chain(group(payments_tasks) | asyncCheckNotifications.subtask()).apply_async(countdown=60) with the following: chain(group(payments_tasks) | asyncCheckNotifications.subtask(countdown=60)).delay()


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It turns out to be a security issue. Rabbitmq by default listens to all Internet interfaces and allows remote connections as long as the account used is not guest. For connections between GCE instances, internal IP addresses or simply instance names should be used. Internal connections are allowed by default. But external ones are forbidden by google. So ...


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I decide I could just declare a instance of every task, and execute them at celery launch. I don't like this at all because it makes starting celery beat extremely slow (if you have slow PeriodicTask), but it does what I want. simply add this to the end of tasks.py: ########### spawn all tasks at launch! ############ localmess = locals().values() ...


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Results of tasks are stored in dedicated message-queues in the AMQP implementation you are using (most probably, RabbitMQ)! Since you have read the document you provide the link to, I am assuming you know how to retrieve results & are only interested in knowing where the result is stored.


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Celery limits to process init timeout to 4.0 sec. Check source code To workaround this limit, you can consider change it before you create celery app from celery.concurrency import asynpool asynpool.PROC_ALIVE_TIMEOUT = 10.0 #set this long enough Note that there is no configuration or setting to change this value.


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I pieced it together. The issue was caused by a corrupt celerybeat-schedule file. To locate the file enter: find ~/ -name celerybeat-schedule -print Then delete or rename the file: mv [filename] [newfilename] Then restart your processes.


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When looking at the Celery documentation there is absolutely no limitation that you can't access RabbitMQ from worker your processes as a remote server instead of just using localhost. Take a look CELERY_QUEUE_HA_POLICY here.



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