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6

what argument is out of what range? Well, I'd expect the exception to tell you that - but I'd also expect it to be the second argument. (EDIT: Looking at the exception you actually get, even from .NET, it's actually blaming the first argument. Admittedly it's the combination of the first and second arguments which is invalid, but it's more sensible to ...


6

Do not put srand(time(NULL)); in your aiPutSign function, you'll get the same random number at every call. Call srand once for example at the start of your program.


5

In the line: total ([("c",e)]:y) = total y ++ [e] the ([("c",e)]:y) does not do what you want. It matches a nonempty list in which the first element is also a list (because of the [...]) and in which that sublist has exactly one element, which is a pair whose first element equals "c". In order to match what you want, you need to write: total ((c,e):y) ...


5

The declarations are not exactly equivalent: the first, third and fourth declarations make writable copies of string literals, while the second one does not make a copy. As the result, it is legal to make an assignment like this cString1[0] = 'S'; // cString3 and cString4 would work as well while trying to do the same with cString2 triggers undefined ...


4

No need to use realloc in this case. Try this instead: t = realloc(t, ROW*sizeof(char**)); for(int i = 0; i < ROW; i++) { t[i] = NULL; t[i] = malloc(COL*sizeof(char *)); } for(...) { s = result(i, j); t[i][j] = s; }


3

char may (or may not) be signed, and it looks like it is on your platform. That means that 0xa5 is sign extended to 0xffa5 before you or in the upper byte. Try casting each byte to unsigned char before doing your bit manipulation.


3

Function strlen returns the index of the first character in memory with a value of 0 (AKA '\0'), starting from the memory address indicated by the input argument passed to this function. If you pass a memory address of "something else" other than a zero-terminated string of characters (which has been properly allocated at that memory address), then there's ...


2

You are Trying to modify a string literal that is stored in a read-only memory adress, because with char* x = "xD"; you declare a pointer to that kind of data. use this char x [] = "xD"; instead, that is NOT a pointer, is an array that you are allowed to modify because it is stored in the stack. or if you want to use a pointer you need to allocate memory for ...


2

Well: warning: Source file is more recent than executable. - That may be your answer. Try recompiling your code.


2

They're (clearly) not equivalent. "string" is a static array of chars that contains the chars's','t','r','i','n','g','\0'. However, {stuff} is an initializer list. It is a static array of elements used to initialize the left hand side. An array decays to a pointer, but an initializer list does not, since it is not an array. Even more confusing, there's a ...


2

Just use strstr(). First once to find the start marker, then call it again with a pointer to the first character after the start marker, to find the end marker: char * extract_between(const char *str, const char *p1, const char *p2) { const char *i1 = strstr(str, p1); if(i1 != NULL) { const size_t pl1 = strlen(p1); const char *i2 = strstr(i1 ...


2

First off: the problem is in this line char* test = "test"; a string literal is read-only data, so you should actually declare this as const char* test = "test"; to make the compiler happy (i.e. I promise I won't try to modify that data, I'll be punished with undefined behavior if I do). That said, you don't need to dereference the pointer since ...


2

Why do I not need to dereference the char pointer Because the iostreams classes have an overload for char* / char const*. Dereferencing it would only output a single char anyway. Also, why is what I have written deprecated, what should I use instead if I don't want a costly std::string object? While it's highly unlikely using std::string will be ...


2

In addition to what @jwodder said, note that there's also another way to approach the problem. Instead of thinking /how/ you would compute the desired value, think about /what/ you do: you take the second element of every list item and then sum those elements up. So you could start by writing two functions, one which takes a list of tuples yielding a list ...


2

roughly speaking for loop is like this for (initial ; stop condition; increment amount) and you are using it as for(i<=5 && i>=-1 ; ++i ; i>0 ) meaning : initial : i<5 && i>=-1 // your i is already 0 stop condition: ++i // stops when ++i = 0 increment amount : i>0 // basically doesnT do anything !! so your loop ...


2

A for loop consists of four parts:- initialisation conditional update body and they are written like this:- for (initialisation ; conditional ; update) { body } Get into the habit of using the { } around the body, it'll save you from silly errors in the future. The initialisation part is usually of the form:- variable = first value but you've ...


1

char cString1[]="string"; declares an array of char of an unspecified size (calculated by compiler) and initializes it with an const array of 7 char (including the '\0' terminator) char * cString2 = "string";' declares a pointer tocharand initializes it with a const array of 7char(including the'\0'` terminator) char cString3[] = {'s','t','r','i','n','g', ...


1

"string" and {'s','t','r','i','n','g','\0'} are equivalent As the initialiser of a character array, yes. In other contexts, no. the first four declarations below all compile and seem to do the same thing. No they don't; three of them declare arrays, while two (try to) declare pointers. But then why doesn't the fifth declaration compile? ...


1

To ease your work, begin drafting what your input looks like in some formal language, for example: line : ID+ ( '<' ID | '>' '>'? ID )* ( '|' line )* '\0' Where ID is run of chars where each either isAlpha or isDigit or isSpecial separated by other chars (like spaces, tabs, '>', '<', '|' and so on. During the parsing it will be easier to add ...


1

The function f() is doomed. Its effect on var cannot be seen outside its scope. It should be changed so that either: (i) it receives a preallocated buffer: void f(char *var) { // just uses var contents } (ii) it receives a pointer to a buffer where it can store a new allocated area: void f(char **var) { *var = (char*) malloc(size*sizeof(char)); ...


1

raw[0] is an object of type char, which happens to be 8-bit signed integer type on your platform. When you stuff 0xA5 value into such signed char object, it actually acquires value of -91. When raw[0] is used as an operand of | operator, it is subjected to usual arithmetic conversions. The latter convert it to value of type int with value -91 (0xFFA5). That ...


1

I. There's no garbage, for two reasons. One is that char p[10] = "Hello"; is equivalent with char p[10] = { 'H', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 }; i. e. it initializes the non-listed members to zero (more precisely, it initializes them as if they were static). Second, even if they were truly uninitialized, you wouldn't have the right to expect ...


1

There's no obvious error in the code you've posted, but trying to manage dynamic memory by juggling raw pointers will almost inevitably lead to errors like this. Perhaps you haven't correctly implemented or deleted the copy constructor and copy-assignment operator, per the Rule of Three. In that case, copying a Player object will give two objects with ...


1

keydown and keyup do not send different keycodes for upper and lower case letters. So your pressedKey is always going to be an uppercase letter while you use either one of those events. And since all your spans contain lowercase letters they will never match and your if block will never be triggered You can use keypress which will send a different keycode ...


1

carSize is an array of strings but you are trying to assign it a char: carSize = ("small"[entryCount]); Here the "small" is a string, and "small"[entryCount] returns the character at the index entryCount You should change carSize to char[] if you want to stores characters, and set the elements using indexer instead of assigning the array directly. Or if ...


1

If you have a character array like this char a[] = "00012312"; then you can find the sum the following way int sum = 0; for ( char *p = a; *p; ++p ) sum += *p - '0'; If you need to convert the content of the array to an integer then you can write int x = ( int )std::strtol( a ); It is the same as int x = std::atoi( a );


1

A char containing 0...9 can be converted to an int by subtracting '0'. Study an ASCII chart to understand why. char c = '7'; int n = c - '0';


1

Let's be clear that your code has a lot of undefined behavior. I tried running your code and here is what I saw on my machine. You should tell us what your behavior was though because it's impossible to say what's going on for you otherwise. First off, here was my program input. 3 hello world cat And the output... cat char str[20] is a memory ...


1

it crashes in the line (*x)++; because x Points to a read only Memory due to the Definition char* x = "xD";. Change it to char x[] = "xD";. so x is an Array and it´s values can be changed



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