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21

Tilde expansion is handled by the shell, not by a system call. You could use getenv() to read the environment variable HOME and then use that as the argument to chdir(). There are system calls to get this information that may be more reliable on an individual system, but they're not completely portable. Look, for example, at getpwuid().


17

Python is interpreting the \2013 part of the path as the escape sequence \201, which maps to the character \x81, which is ├╝ (and of course, C:\Users\Josh\Desktop├╝30216 doesn't exist). Use a raw string, to make sure that Python doesn't try to interpret anything following a \ as an escape sequence. os.chdir(r"C:\Users\Josh\Desktop\20130216")


11

The cd command changes the current directory of a shell process; the Perl chdir function changes the current directory of a Perl process. They're exactly the same thing, just spelled differently.


10

Just because new File(".") gives the desired answer doesn't mean it's doing what you want it to. For example, try: new FileOutputStream("foo.txt").close(); Where does that end up? On my Windows box, even though new File(".").getAbsolutePath() moves around based on user.dir, foo.txt is always created in the original working directory. It strikes me that ...


9

Note that POSIX specifies the semantics of tilde expansion: 2.6.1 Tilde Expansion A "tilde-prefix" consists of an unquoted <tilde> character at the beginning of a word, followed by all of the characters preceding the first unquoted <slash> in the word, or all the characters in the word if there is no <slash>. In an assignment (see ...


8

chdir can be used with arbitrary string. const modifier means that it will not modify your string.


8

It also says It returns true upon success, false otherwise. meaning that your call to chdir failed. Check the $! variable for a clue about what happened. Since you didn't get a fatal runtime error, you don't have to worry about that last paragraph about fchdir. Running a couple of tests, I see chdir FILEHANDLE works when FILEHANDLE refers to a ...


8

It's because the shell starts a new process for your program, and you only change the current directory in that new process. The shells process will be unaffected. Unfortunately (for you) there's no real good (or legal) way to change the working directory of the parent process (the process of the shell).


7

Use is_dir, which checks whether the path exists and is a directory then mkdir. function mkdir_if_not_there($path) { if (!is_dir($path)) { // Watch out for potential race conditions here mkdir($path); } }


7

See the FAQ I {changed directory, modified my environment} in a perl script. How come the change disappeared when I exited the script? How do I get my changes to be visible? In the strictest sense, it can't be done—the script executes as a different process from the shell it was started from. Changes to a process are not reflected in its ...


7

Here is a complete explanation how cd works: http://web.archive.org/web/20090515201659/http://www.cs.ucr.edu/~brett/cs153_w02/syscall.html The cd Unix command just calls chdir and examines the error codes.


7

Your understanding of how source works seems correct to me. But let's write an example so you can compare with your setup and maybe find where you went wrong. Let the /Users/me/test/mother.R file contain the following: print("I am the mother") print(paste("The current dir is:", getwd())) source("grandmother.R") # local path and let the ...


7

what about import os loc = os.getcwd()


7

You are passing the actual string "args[1]" into chdir. This probably is not what you want bu instead you want chdir(args[1]) So your code would look like this: if (!strcmp(cmd, "cd") ) { if(chdir(args[1])!=0){ fprintf(stderr, "chdir %s failed: %s\n", args[1], strerror(errno)); } } From the output of printf your path ...


6

Yes. The current working directory is a property of the process. To expand on that a little - here are a couple of the relevant POSIX definitions: The current working directory is defined as "a directory, associated with a process, that is used in pathname resolution for pathnames that do not begin with a slash character" (there is more detail in the ...


6

Quote: The user.dir property is set at VM startup to be the working directory. You should not change this property or set it on the command-line. If you do, then you will see some inconsistent behaviour as there places in the implementation that assumes that the user.dir is the working directory and that it doesn't change during the lifetime of the VM. ...


6

Uhm... IMHO it's exactly one of the things that the OS must guarantee not to happen. The current dir is a per-process property, a child process usually inherits it from the parent process, but the reverse should not happen (and it doesn's). To obtain what you want, in general, the parent should actively watch some information (message, file, shared ...


6

Since you are reading home_directory from a file, have you forgotten to remove a trailing newline and any other spurious characters before you use it as a parameter to chdir?


6

Add #include <unistd.h>, as per the chdir manual.


6

Yes. If you need relative paths in a multithreaded application, it's safest to use the at() versions of functions. For example, openat() is like open(): int openat(int dirfd, const char *pathname, int flags); The first parameter is the fd to a directory. The path is relative to that directory.


6

chomp $dir; will remove the newline that the command in the backticks appended to its output. It's very rare that a directory name actually contains a newline, although it's possible on many file systems.


5

Yes, if you want to change the environment variable, you have to explicitly do that. It's shell that sets and updates PWD in the normal run of events, so it only reflects changes of the current directory known to the shell.


5

When a shell runs a program, it essentially forks then execs the program -- in this case, your perl script. The directory within that forked process has been changed, and then that process dies. You're then returned to the original shell process.


5

Try Dir.chdir dir.strip or Dir.chdir dir.chomp Reason: With File.foreach you get lines including a newlines (\n). strip will delete leading and trailing spaces, chomp will delete trailing newlines. Another possibility: In your example you use absolute paths. This should work. If you use relative paths, then check, in which directory you are (you ...


5

Take a look what is value of __file__. It doesn't contain absolute path to your script, it's a value from command line, so it may be something like "./myFile.py" or "myFile.py". Also, realpath() doesn't make path absolute, so realpath("myFile.py") called in different directory will still return "myFile.py". I think you should do ssomething like this: ...


5

How about import os, os.path print os.chdir(os.path.join(given_dir, os.pardir)) OR os.chdir(os.path.dirname(given_dir)) (as Selcuk suggested)


4

I think you're confusing the current working directory on the server filesystem and the web server document root. When you create an image element in HTML, it (the browser) looks for the source based on a few parameters. If the src path is relative (no leading slash), the image will load relative to the <base> element URL if set, otherwise the ...


4

First you need to store the current path, before changing dirs: $oldPath = getcwd(); chdir('/some/path'); include(./file.php); chdir($oldPath); Why do you need to change dirs in order to include a file?


4

Are you sure Y: really is a valid drive letter? Try os.chdir('C:') and make sure that works. (It works for me.)


4

From the man page: fgets() reads in at most one less than size characters from stream and stores them into the buffer pointed to by s. Reading stops after an EOF or a newline. If a newline is read, it is stored into the buffer. The problem is there's a newline character '\n' at the end of your string that you got from fgets(), you need to remove ...



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