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14

Opsworks already has support for Ruby 2.0, it's just not exposed through the UI. However, you can easily enable it by simply passing in the following custom JSON { "opsworks" : { "ruby_version" : "2.0.0" } } That's it! No need to install any custom packages or anything.


9

The proper way to enable debug output in the current vagrant chef provisioner is with chef.log_level, not with chef-solo manually or with chef.arguments: Vagrant.configure("2") do |config| # ... config.vm.provision :chef_solo do |chef| chef.log_level = :debug # ... end end


7

chef-solo is a part of Chef Client See the package contents from Ubuntu 13.04 vagrant@devops:~$ dpkg -L chef | grep chef-solo /opt/chef/bin/chef-solo /opt/chef/embedded/lib/ruby/gems/1.9.1/gems/chef-11.6.0/bin/chef-solo Install Chef Client Option 1 Shell script => install.sh which detects OS and use OS specific packages to install chef Option 2 Use ...


6

This warning was introduced in Chef 11.12.0. See the release notes for details: When ssl_verify_mode is set to :verify_none, Chef will print a warning. Use knife ssl check to test SSL connectivity and then add ssl_verify_mode :verify_peer to your configuration file to fix the warning. Though :verify_none is currently the default, this will be ...


5

Who is responsibile for copying the cookbooks to the specific Vagrant folder (Berkshelf, the vagrant-berkshelf plugin, or Vagrant)? A little from column A and a little from column B, both of which get some help from column C. The Vagrant chef-solo provisioner has the ability to copy cookbooks (+ roles/data bags/etc) from the host machine to the ...


5

You are using Chef::Provider where you should be using Chef::Resource. ruby_block "parse-json" do block do f = Chef::Resource::File::RemoteFile.new("/tmp/googlebackup", run_context) f.source "http://google.com" f.run_action :create end action :create end


4

The json requires you to specify for chef the rbenv location that your installing ruby to. since the recipes call that you install rbenv on a system level and then a user lvl in this case vagrant. chef.add_recipe "rbenv::system" chef.add_recipe "rbenv::vagrant" So i went and changed the json to this: chef.json = { 'rbenv' => { 'user_installs' ...


4

I cloned your gem and fired up Vagrant (but using a Debian Squeeze image I already downloaded and with all recipes disabled except postgresql and postgresql::server, and using PostgreSQL 8.4 instead of 9.1) and it seems that the empty password was a bad choice, using postgresql: { password: { postgres: 'foo' } } works with the command ...


4

The error is pretty descriptive. You likely have a cookbook in your runlist that has depends apt in its metadata.rb file. Luckily, this easy to resolve - just include the apt cookbook (https://github.com/opscode-cookbooks/apt) in your cookbooks folder and call it in your runlist (or role, when you get to that level).


4

If you run chef-solo inside Vagrant additional custom arguments (for logging/debugging) can be injected from the Vagrantfile like this: Vagrant.configure("2") do |config| # ... config.vm.provision :chef_solo do |chef| chef.arguments = '-l debug' # ... end end


4

Immediate solution Butcher plugin The immediate answer that springs to mind is use the vagrant butcher plugin. This will automtically delete your developer client and node entries on the chef server. Longer term solution Since you're aware of the Berkshelf "chef_api" directive I will assume you have the typical Enterprise scenario where several ...


3

You can use chef-solo directly from the shell inside your VM but this requires a different file structure than what you have for vagrant already. It's looks a bit like what is done here: You need your cookbooks directory You need a .json file containing all your data that resides in chef.json in your Vagrantfile And you need a wrapper/startup ruby script ...


3

You need to override additional variables: prefix, url, sbin_path and default_configure_flags: set['nginx']['version'] = "1.5.3" set['nginx']['source']['version'] = "1.5.3" # The Chef checksum of a binary is determined by: shasum -a 256 FILE_NAME set['nginx']['source']['checksum'] = "edcdf2030750b4eb1ba8cd79365c16a3e33e6136b7fdd8a1a7b4082397f4e92b" ...


3

After downgrading to the latest pre-2.0 version (1.8.5) of RubyGems, everything works fine. This issue will most likely be addressed in RubyGems 2.0.3.


3

The pip and virtualenv are already included as part of python's default recipe. By specifying recipe[python] you effectively loaded recipe recipe[python::default] which includes respective install method, pip and virtualenv. In order to use python_pip and python_virtualenv providers (as name suggest they provide the functionality) you just add them to your ...


3

You have already solved problem A with the Ruby block. Now you have to solve problem B with a similar approach: ruby_block "create user" do block do user = Chef::Resource::User.new(node[:var], run_context) user.shell '/bin/bash' # Set parameters using this syntax user.run_action :create user.run_action :manage # Run multiple actions (if ...


3

Okay, this requires that you have Chef preinstalled on your AMI: http://scottwb.com/blog/2012/12/13/provision-and-bootstrap-windows-ec2-instances-with-chef/ But this is a strategy for installing Puppet to a stock Windows AMI, which could easily be modified for Chef: http://dansrandombits.blogspot.com/2012/06/bootstrapping-custom-windows-ec2.html I can't ...


3

I have had limited (read: next to none) exposure to Chef, so I can't see your problem. However, I would make some suggestions in case you haven't tried: Look for any override or force-override attribute types that might be causing weirdness. Look for a depends apache2 in any of the metadata.rb files. Just as one does writing code, build your Vagrantfile ...


3

If you use ChefSpec you can find all the packages by calling chef_run.find_resources(:package) inside some test. See the source code. Like this: require 'chefspec' describe 'example::default' do let(:chef_run) { ChefSpec::Runner.new.converge(described_recipe) } it 'does something' do chef_run.find_resources(:package)... end end


3

You might also ask why chef-solo supports the --splay and --interval arguments. Don't forget that chef-server is not the only source of data. Configuration values can rely on a bunch of other sources (APIs, OHAI, DNS...). The most classic one is OHAI - think of a cookbook that configures memcached. You would probably want to keep X amount of RAM for the ...


2

I was using Vagrant to provision my server using the Chef scripts. The Chef scripts were edited on Windows, which were available on the Linux VM via a shared folder. The mistake was that my editor on Windows was not configured to use Unix line-endings, which confused Ruby. Stripping carriage returns (^M) allowed the script to run normally.


2

It always works by installing from source, but yum is preferred to install rpm to manage dependencies and updates. If you just want php v5.3, go ahead using the php cookbook where the default option is installing php53 from CentOS yum repo. If you want php v5.5, you can just provide another recipe to include a yum repository contains php55 like Webtatic EL ...


2

The answer really depends on what kind of attribute it is. For example you could set a common global attribute in a: Environment Role Cookbook included by all other cookbooks An exotic alternative would be to use a databag, another useful way to record global data. Example use-cases: Store truly global information (stuff that never changes) in an ...


2

If you are using chef-solo, make sure your solo.rb points to the correct cookbook location. I had set it as : cookbook_path "/root/chef-repo/cookbooks" instead of: cookbook_path "/home/ubuntu/chef-repo/cookbooks"


2

the error trace indicates that it's thrown from chef-client. so you need to check /etc/chef/client.rb. You need an entry there like: log_level :info Refer to article About client.rb for details.


2

You can use the vagrant-proxyconf plugin: vagrant plugin install vagrant-proxyconf Then configure it for all VMs using $HOME/.vagrant.d/Vagrantfile. For example something like: Vagrant.configure("2") do |config| config.proxy.http = "http://192.168.0.2:3128/" config.proxy.https = "http://192.168.0.2:3128/" # exclude your internal networks, ...


2

Sure, you can inspect the run_context. This is how ChefSpec does it: # # Automatically appends "+::default+" to recipes that need them. # # @param [String] name # # @return [String] # def with_default(name) name.include?('::') ? name : "#{name}::default" end # # The list of loaded recipes on the Chef run (normalized) # # @return [Array<String>] # ...


1

The chef-oracle-xe Chef recipe uses expect to configure Oracle. Instead one should use silent installation. The example response file is found from Oracle XE zip-package. The format is very simple: ORACLE_HTTP_PORT=8080 ORACLE_LISTENER_PORT=1521 ORACLE_PASSWORD=manager ORACLE_CONFIRM_PASSWORD=manager ORACLE_DBENABLE=y I use silent installation in my own ...


1

I prefer to use JSON format wherever possible for one simple reason - it's easy to parse and validate with a script. Here are three things that you can do if all your Chef data is in JSON format: Easily perform a syntax check in a git pre-commit hook, something that's much harder to do when the file is in the Ruby DSL format. Validate the keys and ...


1

You can try looking at my repo at https://github.com/dmytro/chef-solo I am using it to bootstrap Rails environments for myself. Additionally it can be combined with Capistrano deployment. I use this in my capistrano recipes https://github.com/dmytro/capistrano-recipes I've put blog post on these. Please lake a look too: ...



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