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3

The name of LWRP-based resources uses both the cookbook name and resource filename. In your case it would be couchbase_nodes.


3

You could create a simple helper like this: module MyServiceChecker def my_service_running? cmd = Mixlib::ShellOut.new('/etc/init.d/my_service status') cmd.run_command cmd.exitstatus == 0 end end Chef::Recipe.send(:include, MyServiceChecker) Chef::Resource.send(:include, MyServiceChecker) Chef::Provider.send(:include, MyServiceChecker) ...


3

It turns out the issue for me was that while ~/.vagrant.d/plugins.json included the vagrant-omnibus plugin, the ~/.vagrant.d/gems/gems and ~/.vagrant.d/gems/specifications directories did not contain the appropriate GEM or gemspec files. Not sure how this happened, but I suspect it was due to accidentally typing ^C in the middle of execution of the vagrant ...


3

There is no correlation between attribute file names and recipes. All files in the attributes/ folder are loaded in order during the start of the Chef Client run. Even if you name an attribute.rb file the same as a recipe, Chef makes no correlation. All attribute files will be loaded each time.


2

All my comments, as an answer (plus an actual answer). You can disable the Ohai plugin for passwd if you aren't using those attributes or are connected to an AD. If you want the attributes available on the node object, but not persisted back to the server, you can do something like this in a cookbook: class Chef class Node alias_method :old_save, ...


2

Before you can use any of the LWRP resources provided by the cookbook, you must include the default recipe into your runlist. This is required because you need to install some additional libraries in order to communicate with S3 (which is exactly what the default recipe does). To quote the README file of the cookbook: The default recipe installs the ...


2

They are stored with bookshelf which is (quoting the readme) Bookshelf is an S3 API compatible object store. I'm talking about the Open Source Chef Server, as far as I know the Entreprise Chef server (hosted or private) use the same architecture, the main change is the WebUI and the addons for Entreprise chef.


2

This error is happening because the rake command uses bundle exec to execute. The bundle includes Test Kitchen and kitchen-vagrant, which require the presence of Vagrant to run. You can disable these by running: bundle install --without integration Or by removing them from your Gemfile.


2

They end up in the bookshelf file storage, but not in a directly useable way. Look in /var/opt/chef-server/bookshelf, the files are stored by content hash and have a CRC check prepended to them. The file metadata is all stored in Postgres though, either in the sandbox data or the cookbook version.


2

Yes, your if code is executed during compile phase, while your batch ressource is executed within the converge phase see details here. You can achieve what you wish by running the batch resource at compile time like: batch "Get installed software list" do code "wmic /output:C:\\InstallList.txt product get name,version" action :nothing ...


2

ssh_wrapper "ssh -i /some/path/id_rsa" In case someone comes across this, the above didn't work for me, I kept getting the error: error: cannot run ssh -i /some/path/id_rsa: No such file or directory What specifying ssh_wrapper does is it sets the GIT_SSH environment variable, and it turns out you can't provide parameters in the GIT_SSH environment ...


2

Yes. All of these 3 can help you with that. Which one is better is highly opinion-based.


2

Chef uses recipes to define resources that are executed on nodes via a chef-client. A recipe is basically a definition of what to do (a script) A resource is a particular element you are configuring (a file, a service, or package etc) A node is the machine running chef-client The json that you are setting up for chef-solo defines attributes which are ...


2

Yes, -j will let you supply a JSON blob of attributes to the first chef-client run of your recipes. It's generally best to add scope to your node attributes so if you expand things you have less chance of clashing with other attributes. knife bootstrap <host> -r 'recipe[your_cb::your_recipe]' -j '{ "your_cb": { "load_version": "$LOAD_VERSION" } }' ...


2

The best workaround would be to use a ruby_block or a log resource to notify your execute at end. All resources can notify if they are changed, not only templates. so any resource which is not idempotent per nature would do. Another options is to use Chef::Handlers which are run at the end of the chef run, even if it fails somewhere you may wish to have a ...


2

Hyphens become underscores in resource names, so that should be some_name_manage. This is because hyphens aren't allowed in Ruby method names.


2

You still need the windows cookbook because it is a dependency of something you are using. It won't actually use any recipes from that cookbook, but it does need to be loaded. I recommend using Berkshelf as it takes care of this for you behind the scenes.


2

You are calling a recipe from another cookbook, so you need to add it as a dependency in your cookbook's metadata. Add the following line to the metadata.rb file (in the divups cookbook): depends "apt"


1

To summarize from IRC, the file just needed to be restored manually from a copy of the package. Possibly disk corruption at work. Also for the record, the distro packages for Chef and Chef Server should never be used.


1

Gem documentation is HERE To uninstall it is gem uninstall ffi -v 1.5.0 What the errors tells you is that it can't load it because ffi is in versino 1.5 and ohai require it in a version around 1.9.X (the ~> 1.9). You best bet to resolve the problem is to run a gem update ffi -v 1.9.3 And update chef too to remove old depending: gem update chef


1

chef.json does not execute or define commands. It defines attributes for the node which can be used by recipes. I would recomand reading THIS and THIS Some of the json content is generated by vagrant like defining the runlist attribute with the chef.add_recipe keyword in the vagrantfile. For your use case you should have a cookbook with a recipe parsing ...


1

Credentials need to be secured, so I would argue against using node attributes. Instead I would offer one of two alternatives: Encrypted data bag Chef vault You can use the node's environment to determine which databag to lookup: bag_item[node.chef_environment]["some_other_key"]


1

This happens because the server has a fixed number of devsolver workers, and each of those has a timeout on a single solver attempt. You probably want to increase the number of workers in your chef-server.rb config.


1

Not sure this is the best approach. You can definitely use knife download, sed, and knife upload as you mentioned but a better way would be to make it data driven. Either store the values in a data bag or role, and manipulate those either using knife or another API client. Then in your recipe code you can read out the values and use them.


1

As some of the commenters have said, you are being locked out because the instance is listening on port 22, but your security groups are only allowing TCP connections on port 999. There is no way to connect to the instance in this state. There are three solutions to this problem that I can see. Solution 1: Make a new AMI Create a new AMI which has sshd ...


1

You need to use the rbenv_gem resource.


1

Your problem is here: connect': SSL_connect returned=1 errno=0 state=SSLv3 read server certificate B: certific ate verify failed (Faraday::SSLError) Your proxy is doing a n interception on SSL traffic and use its own certificate to resign the distant site certificate. So you have to add your proxy certificate into the cacerts.pem of your ruby ...


1

When running chef at scale there are three ways to isolate configuration between users. Use enterprise chef and setup an chef "organisation" for functional group of users Use open source chef server and setup a server for each functional group of users. Create chef "environments" for each functional group, within a single instance of chef server. I ...


1

As mentioned up in the comments, this is generally solved through the use of library and wrapper cookbooks. You would have a shared activemq cookbook (possibly from the community site or written in-house) which provides a the core configuration steps for ActiveMQ. The nfor each environment you would have a cookbook/recipe like prod_a::activemq or which sets ...


1

When using the Chef gem it automatically decodes some responses into Ruby objects for you. You can either use the object directly (specifically you want #recipe_filenames and then parse those to the cookbook_name::recipe_name format) or you could use a better API client like Chef-API or PyChef.



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