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10

You might want to look at Arduino, it's an open source hardware/software electronics prototyping platform with a great IDE and excellent user community. Definitely a great place to start.


9

As is often the case, Wikipedia has an answer: Architectures that did not have eight-bit bytes include the CDC 6000 series scientific mainframes that divided their 60-bit floating-point words into 10 six-bit bytes. These bytes conveniently held character data from punched Hollerith cards, typically the upper-case alphabet and decimal digits. CDC also ...


6

If you check the Google Wallet FAQ you can find the following : Your payment credentials are stored in a chip called the Secure Element contained within your phone. The Secure Element is isolated from your phone’s main operating system and hardware. Only authorized programs like Google Wallet can access the Secure Element to initiate a transaction. ...


6

How to schedule threads to cores for close to optimum memory performance depends on the access pattern to memory, and is usually not worth the trouble. If your program is in Java, you are probably not going to have the level of control required to get close to optimum performance. Modern CPUs have integrated memory controllers, and modern multi-socket ...


4

This is an open-ended question, I won't be able to give you the absolute answer, but I can give you some ideas to try. Are you sure the data is correct? Take the array my_const_array[] and write a small program to convert it back to an 8bit wav and make sure you hear the right sound. To me the wave data you have listed looks very short, there's only ~430 ...


4

Not sure what exactly you are trying to understand. Resets can and are used in a number of different ways and places. And in general there are no rules that state when and where they can be used. Relative to the speed at which electricity flows through circuits it takes quite a while from the time power is "turned on" to the point where the voltage and ...


3

My understanding is that the wafer crystals are "grown" in a cylinder, making them cylindrical. The cylinders are then cut into the wafers, and then the individual chips are cut from that. *edit: And it looks like that was about right http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/history/museum-making-silicon.html


3

1) How do the two CPUs communicate, how fast would they communicate? Most time they communicate via memory or nearest shared memory hierarchy level. (System memory both on SMP and NUMA is considered as shared level; even if in NUMA it is accesses via memory controller of another chip. this is just Non-Uniform=slower access) 2) How fast would two ...


3

Chip-8 registers only contain a single 8-bit byte. A single byte can only hold values between 0 and 255 inclusive. If an operation gives you a value which is outside the range of an 8-bit byte, you need to only preserve the lower 8 bits. That's what both of those implementations are doing, although in slightly different ways: the Javascript implementation ...


3

In a way it's totally arbitrary - but 8 bits is convenient. It holds 256 values so it's large enough to store all the upper and lower case letters, numbers and symbols plus it's divisible by 2, and 4 which is handy for a few things.


3

A memory address is the location of a specific byte in memory. A byte has 8 bits.


2

For NVIDIA or ATI GPUs, check this: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2843244/how-to-read-gpu-graphic-card-temperature


2

According to that specs, that chip uses the SMBus protocol. So the chip is accessed from some interface chip on your graphics card using the SMBus protocol, and is probably exported to the OS as an I2C/SMBus device. To access it you would need to access the interface chip using IN/OUT. As an example, my USB TV capture card has several chips: An USB ...


2

The data sheets for this device seem to indicate that the Data Memory is static ram, and that there is no data path from there to the instruciton decode logic, ie, the data memory cannot be used to store program code for execution. If that was your goal, you are out of luck. In terms of allocating volatile storage, since the program memory does not appear ...


2

Answer to original question: The "frequency of red, represent in bits" you asked for is 480 to 405 THz, so in bits that is 111100000 to 110010101. But you also said "its defined in nanometers", so that is 630 to 740nm which is 1001110110 to 1011100100 in binary. If you want to drive a loudspeaker with a waveform, you need either a sample audio waveform or a ...


2

The .NET and Visual Studio compilers don't really care AFAIK since I have experimented with this before and the assembly that it spits out is the same no matter what. In the case of ICC and GCC there are certain callpaths that must be differentiated for AMD and for Intel (very specific things) which you probably shouldn't worry about to begin with. GCC not ...


2

It depends on how you configure it. I think by default, no it doesn't matter. If you're using the Intel Compiler and you compile with /QxHost or /fast, then it will matter since it clearly looks at your system to see what it's capable of. But if you specify /arch:XXX or whatever option, it will be independent of your machine. For GCC, I think by default it ...


2

The CC2540 does work with the iphone 4s and in fact, TI has provided an example xcode project to prove it. Read about it on their wiki: http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/Category:IPhone4SBLEDemo#App_Operation Bluegiga also has a module that uses this chip and comes with a wrapper protocol to use their own development language.


2

The CC2540 is a Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) chip. This is a new mode of Bluetooth, part of the 4.0 standard. The LE mode is NOT compatible with previous Bluetooth standards. The only phone on the market that has an LE capable chip is the iPhone 4S. Soon, all new phones will start to support BT LE. The chip in the iPhone is dual mode so it can do regular ...


2

You're only initialising d_cellSizeZ on the last device, so on the other devices it will be undefined. You need to initialise d_cellSizeZ on each of the devices, the easiest way is to do that inside the loop as Greg suggested in comments: for(int i = 0; i < numDev; ++i) { checkCudaErrors(cudaSetDevice(i)); ...


2

Typically C is used. Sometimes assembly, but that will be harder to use considering your Java background. Count up how many sensors, outputs, and the type of the sensor or output. For example, you'll need at least one ADC to read your temperature sensor and at least two GPIO pins to control your valve and igniter. Yes. Depends on the sensor. For example, ...


2

assembly or C there are many good choices, I think a good place to start might be the 8 bit PICs and I would use assembly. Many people like the Ardiunos too. usually, yes it depends, one might choose a thermistor or use a thermocouple (more accurate). You will need to worry about some hardware there to, stuff that is on-board the chip (Micro-controller) ...


2

First of all, note that the pixels are bitpacked - each byte will contain 8 pixels of sprite data. In other words, the byte 0xAA is a single-pixel tall sprite with the first, third, fifth and seventh pixel set. When drawing your sprite, you need to loop through each bit. If the bit is set, you flip the corresponding bit in your display - 0 becomes 1 and 1 ...


1

You need to find out what chip you will be using, and download the datasheet and a compiler for it. Read the entire datasheet. Most chips have compilers that work with C. There is little benefit to reading up on some other chip family. They are all the same in principle, but you need to learn the specific details you will be needing in practice. You won't ...


1

You don't need a separate memory chip, as a PIC has some internal memory; you can use the res directive to allocate bytes of memory which can be later used as variables. The process would be the following: Read the user's input Save the input in the allocated memory space Store it in the variable Do whatever you want Furthermore, you don't need to ...


1

[This is off-topic. But since I know the answer...] TTL inputs do not float to logical 0 when left unconnected. When your switches are in the "off" position, there is nothing connected to the inputs. So you need pull-down resistors on your inputs.


1

It doesn't matter. From the software point of view AMD and Intel are the same chips: x86-based CPUs. Yes, they can have different extended instruction sets. But the same you can say about Intel CPUs belonging to the different generations. Visual Studio compiler will run on all of them and produce the same code.


1

Your program is probably wrong! I suppose that you are using a single bit DAC so: Line.. LATAbits.LATA2=TABLAT; will copy only first (zero) bit to CPU pin RA2 the rest 7 are lost.


1

There is absolutely no correlation between the binary values that make up the encoding for a some letters of English, and the PCM values that would make up a sampled version of the sound of someone saying the encoded word. If you want to play back the sound of someone saying "red", you will first have to sample it and store the resulting bits somewhere, ...


1

Based on what you've said in your comments, it sounds like you want to get a stream of bits from the ASCII representation of a string like "red". You can do that by looping over each character of the string, and then looping over each bit position: const char *str = "I hate programming"; // Loop over each character for (i = 0; i < strlen(str); i++) { ...



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