Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

60

From the Elements of Ruby Style Ruby allows you to leave out parenthesis, in general, resist this temptation. Parenthesis make the code easier to follow. General Ruby style is to use them, except in the following cases: Always leave out empty parentheses The parentheses can be left out of a single command that is surrounded by ERb ...


53

I had a similar situation but fixed that easily. Try this: Extend ListActivity and set your custom list adapter public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); requestWindowFeature(Window.FEATURE_NO_TITLE); //if you need title to be hidden setContentView(R.layout.activity_add_to_cart_select_service_plan); ...


34

Have you looked at the comparison in the variant library already? (Not sure what states from external sources are, so it's kind of hard to say what's more appropriate for you.)


26

A refers to the version your merge target is based on. If you Merge from branch to trunk, 'A' will be the previous trunk version. B is what you currently have in your local trunk folder, including local changes. C is the Version you wanna merge on top of B.


18

Yes, You are almost there.. just missing a sequence .. Since it's the set of fields you have to wrap them under sequence.. These sequence tags will be under <Choice> tag. Now either of these set of tags (Sequence) will be validated. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <xs:schema attributeFormDefault="unqualified" ...


14

Try looking at boost::any and boost::variant. The first one enables you to insert any type in a boost::any variable, tracking its type. It's more a "check-at-runtime" type. The second one force you to define all the types to be inserted (ie boost::variant < Choice1, Choice2, ... > ), but enforce more type-checking at compile time. Both are used to store ...


13

I use parens as comments to help the future me... who is likely to have fewer brain cells than the current me :-) Nothing worse than looking at some code you wrote 2 years ago and misunderstanding it, so that you break something while modifying it. If parens will save the future me a few minutes (or hours) in the future, I'll put in as many as needed to ...


13

I suggest you don't worry about "sticking" with a language and learn to move in and out of whatever is the best solution for your problem. The best programmers are simply great problem solvers - the particular language doesn't really matter.


12

I believe you are working under a fallacy. There are several frameworks out there specifically for game programming --- written by people with much experience with the complication of game design, almost certainly more tha you do. In other words, you have a "High risk of performance issues" if you DON'T use a framework.


11

How about the delta character? Δ Or, what about the +/- character ? ±


11

From The Symfony Docs Form theming How to customize form rendering Default form div layout What you basically need to do is to overload checkbox_widget block. {% form_theme form _self %} {% block checkbox_widget %} {% spaceless %} <input type="checkbox" {{ block('widget_attributes') }}{% if value is defined %} value="{{ value }}"{% endif %}{% if ...


11

You are getting a new random letter in each if statement. There is a possibility that the new choice won't be the letter that you're comparing, or it could even be the letter you're comparing every time. There's no way to know. If you just want to get a single random letter from the list and do something based on which one it was, store it in a variable and ...


9

Sounds like you're doing a three-way merge, so A should be the base revision that B and C are based on, B is theirs and C is yours (I believe; B and C might be the opposite, though).


9

I figured you could just access the POST dictionary directly in your __init__ method because it looks like the wizard passes POST into each form instance via get_form, but I don't see the data for some reason. Instead of dwelling on that too long the alternative I've come up with is using the render_template hook. class ContactWizard(FormWizard): def ...


9

I've been searching for an answer to this problem all morning, and the most useful thing I've found so far is this article. While I haven't implemented the solution it suggests yet, it sounds like it's on the right track. Basically, the single-choice ListView expects the widgets you provide it with to implement the Checkable interface. LinearLayout et al ...


9

it's obvious for every beginner it's some what tedious to get the things at instance. Anyways, are you able to use table-view & know it's delegate and datasource? If your answer is in favor than for a glance as for implementation part, just think it's like a table view(but remember it's not a table view controller). So, just see how it's resembles: ...


8

I'm no XML expert, although I use it quite a lot. This isn't the way I'd generally do this sort of structure. I would prefer a separate complex types rather than a choice of two groups (see the very end of this answer). I suspect that the problem is that ReservationGroup and CancellationGroup start with the same element, in which case you will violate the ...


8

I leave them out when I'm doing DSL-ish stuff, like t.column or has_many in rails. The rest of the time, it generally comes down to clarity, and it's probably an even split.


8

My current thinking is: If you want to learn to program, start making the game engine from the base elements upwards (even implementing basic data structures - lists, maps, etc). I've done this once, and while it was a learning experience, I made many mistakes, and I wouldn't do this a second time around. However for learning how to program as well as ...


8

I prefer the first approach: it's semantically consistent. if an Ajax action involves resource XXX, you (and other coders) will know where to find things in your application, thanks to Rails conventions. if your application is heavy on Ajax (and nowadays most of them are), you will end up with a behemoth AjaxController that negates the whole RESTful thing. ...


8

Processing makes it (relatively) easy to visualize data. The website gives some hints about where / who is using it: Processing is an open source programming language and environment for people who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It is used by students, artists, designers, researchers, and hobbyists for learning, prototyping, and ...


8

Use the .index() property of the list object ONLY if the list is unique, like the one below (i.e. no doubles). >>> import random >>> foo = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] >>> a = random.choice(foo) >>> a 3 >>> foo.index(a) 2 But a better approach would be to select a random number as the index, since that is independent of the ...


8

Use random.sample() to produce a sample of N elements with no repeats: random_id_list = random.sample(read_id_list, num_reads) Removing elements from the middle of a large list is indeed slow, as everything beyond that index has to be moved up a step. This does not, of course, remove elements from the original list anymore, so repeated random.sample() ...


7

I would recomend you try pyglet. It has good performance, as it utilizes opengl Its a compact all-in-one library It has no extra dependencies besides python Do some tests, see if you can make it fast enough for you. Only if you prove to yourself that it's not move to a lower level. Although, I'm fairly confident that python + pyglet can handle it... at ...


7

A is your parent revision having B and C as child, that means B is the changes done to A by user1/repo1 and C is changes done to A by other user(user2/repo2) kdiff gives you the option either to select modification from b or c(or take both) or from parent also 'A'


7

You have run across a classic problem - You are attempting to expand %errorlevel% within a parenthesized block of code. That form of expansion occurs at parse time, but the entire IF construct is parsed at once, so the value of %errorlevel% will not change. The solution is simple - delayed expansion. You need SETLOCAL EnableDelayedExpansion at the top, and ...


7

Not using random.choice, using random.randint : import random room = random.randint(1,15)


6

I guess I do both, but I definitely keep them in if it adds to readability and avoids statements that look ambiguous.


6

More generally this is a 'discriminated union' or tagged union. As mentioned boost::variant or boost::any are both implementations of this strategy.


6

Putting it all together with the string module. import random import string chars = string.ascii_uppercase + string.ascii_lowercase + string.digits for row in range(10): print ''.join(random.choice(chars) for col in range(7))



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible