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31

What about a basic your_string.strip("0") to remove both trailing and leading zeros ? If you're only interested in removing trailing zeros, use .rstrip instead (and .lstrip for only the leading ones). [More info in the doc.] You could use some list comprehension to get the sequences you want like so: trailing_removed = [s.rstrip("0") for s in ...


15

IO.popen("Generate a list of files").readlines.map(&:chomp)


13

It removes the last newline. Since you're slurping in the whole file, you're going to have to do a regex substitution to get rid of them: $variable =~ s/\n//g;


13

Don't use the shell, then. #! /usr/bin/perl use warnings; use strict; use Cwd; use POSIX qw/ strftime /; my $date = localtime; my $datef = strftime "%Y%m%d%H%M.%S", localtime; my $pwd = getcwd; The result is slightly different: the output of the date command contains a timezone, but the value of $date above will not. If this is a problem, ...


12

chomp modifies its argument. It does not return a modified argument. The second example is, in fact, how you're supposed to use it. edit: perldoc -f chomp says: chomp This safer version of "chop" removes any trailing string that corresponds to the current value of $/ (also known as $INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR in the "English" ...


9

The lines of your input ends with CR LF. You're removing the LF only. A simple solution is to use the following instead of chomp: s/\s+\z//; You could also use the dos2unix command line tool to convert the files before passing them to Perl.


8

In your loop, before the print: next unless $line =~ /\S/;


7

From perldoc -f chomp: chomp VARIABLE chomp( LIST ) chomp This safer version of "chop" removes any trailing string that corresponds to the current value of $/ (also known as $INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR in the "English" module). It returns the total number of characters removed from all its arguments. The proper usage is to simply ...


6

Try this: re:replace(A, "(^\\s+)|(\\s+$)", "", [global,{return,list}]).


6

More generally, the IO::All module does indeed provide the equivalent of an autochomp: use IO::All; # for getting command output: my @date = io("date|")->chomp->slurp; #$date[0] contains the chomped first line of the output or more generally: my $fh = io("file")->chomp->tie; while (<$fh>) { # no need to chomp here ! $_ is pre-chomped ...


6

Chomp only removes a newline (actually, the current value of $/, but that's a newline in your case) from the end of the string. To remove all newlines, do: $variable =~ y/\n//d;


5

you should always use : use strict; use warnings; at the begining of your scripts. and use 3 args open, lexical handles and test opening for failure, so your script becomes: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dumper; my @fruits; my $file = 'fruits'; open my $fh, '<', $file or die "unable to open '$file' for reading :$!"; while(my ...


5

Try putting it into a function: sub autochomp { my $command = shift; my $retval = `$command`; chomp $retval; return $retval; } And then call that for each command you want to execute and then chomp.


5

I would just count the number of separators before splitting the line. If you don't have enough, read the next line and append it. The tr operator is an efficient way to count characters. #!/usr/bin/perl -w use strict; use warnings; open (MYFILE, '<', 'data.txt'); while (<MYFILE>) { # Continue reading while line incomplete: while (tr/|// ...


5

The chomp is made on a copy of $_, so it should not affect the socket handle at all. More likely, the removal of the newline is making your print statement wait in the buffer, and execute once the script is terminated. In other words: It's not an error, just a delay. Try using autoflush to execute the print immediately. $| = 1;


5

Try this construction: re:replace(A, "\\s+", "", [global,{return,list}]). Example session: Erlang R15B01 (erts-5.9.1) [source] [async-threads:0] [hipe] [kernel-poll:false] Eshell V5.9.1 (abort with ^G) 1> A = " 21\t\n ". " 21\t\n " 2> re:replace(A, "\\s+", "", [global,{return,list}]). "21" UPDATE Above solution will strip space symbols ...


5

If the input file was generated on a different platform (one that uses a different EOL sequence), chomp might not strip off all the newline characters. For example, if you created the text file in Windows (which uses \r\n) and ran the script on Mac or Linux, only the \n would get chomp()ed and the output would still "look" like it had newlines. If you know ...


4

You have issues with line endings; chomp removes trailing char/string of $/ from $text and that can vary depending on platform. You can however choose to remove from string any trailing white space using regex, open(my $INPUT, "<", "input.txt"); my $text = <$INPUT>; my $repetitions = <$INPUT>; s/\s+\z// for $text, $repetitions; print $text x ...


4

chomp removes the trailing newline from the argument. Since none of your four fields should actually contain a newline, this is probably something you want to do for the purposes of data processing. You can remove the newline with chomp before you even split the line into fields, and then add a newline after each record with your final print statement: ...


4

chomp is used to remove the $/ variable which is set to mostly \n (new line). $/ is the input record separator, newline by default. chomp: It returns the total number of characters removed from all its arguments. It's often used to remove the newline from the end of an input record.


4

ViewPager, perhaps? http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2011/08/horizontal-view-swiping-with-viewpager.html That will give you an effect similar to swiping between views in Android Market. I'm assuming that's the effect that you're describing?


4

split is good when you're keeping the order. If you're breaking the ordering like this you have a bit of a problem. You have two choices: split according to \t and then join the ones you want. be explicit. an example of the first choice is: my ($a,$b,$c1, $c2, $d) = split /\t/, $_; my $c = "$c1\t$c2"; an example of the second choice is: my ($a, $b, ...


4

Use DateTime or other of the date modules on CPAN instead of the date utility. For example: use DateTime; my $dt = DateTime->now; print $dt->strftime('%Y%m%d%H%M.%S');


3

You can print the line only if it has a non-space character: while(my $line = <DATA>) { print $line if ($line=~/\S/); }


3

You're not opening any file. FL is a file handle that never is opened, and therefore you can't read from it. The first thing you need to do is put use warnings at the top of your program to help you with these problems.


3

I'm guessing that you have DOS-style newlines (i.e., \r\n) in your fruits file. The chomp command normally only works on unix-style (i.e., \n.)


3

IO.read("something").split($/) $/ is the separator string. IO.read closes the file after reading.


3

gets.chomp.to_i Will convert it to an integer. You may also want to use a switch instead: begin selected_option = gets.chomp.to_i case selected_option when 1 puts "Welcome to the Welcome Screen!" when 2 puts "This is the options menu." when 3 puts "Logging out. Goodbye!" else puts "Please select a valid ...


3

To detect lines with nothing but whitespace, while (<CONNECTION>) { print $_; if ($_ =~ /\S/) {print "blank line detected\n"; } } should be while (<CONNECTION>) { print $_; if ($_ !~ /\S/) {print "blank line detected\n"; } } Or for short, while (<CONNECTION>) { print; if (!/\S/) {print "blank line detected\n"; } } ...


3

You can use a regular expression String text = "Hello\r\nThere\r\n"; String shortText = text.replaceAll("\r", "");



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