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20

My answer is correct? Yes, mostly, and certainly in the context you describe. This is not multiple inheritance: It's what you said it is, single inheritance with multiple levels. This is multiple inheritance: Inheriting from two or more bases that don't have any "is a" relationship with each other; that would be inheriting from unrelated lines, or ...


14

This is a Class Reference. They are used to work with meta classes. The canonical example is the Delphi streaming framework which uses TComponentClass = class of TComponent; This allows for dynamic binding to virtual constructors. The TComponent constructor is virtual. The streaming framework needs to instantiate classes derived from TComponent. It ...


13

That's the definition of an abstract class. You cannot create an instance of it, only a type derived from it. Think of something like a fruit. You cannot have a fruit sitting on the table. It must be a certain type of fruit, such as an orange or an apple. In this case, fruit would be an abstract class, and can implement functionality and properties ...


10

You call an instance of a class as in the following: o = object() # create our instance o() # call the instance But this will typically give us an error. Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: 'object' object is not callable How can we call the instance as intended, and perhaps get something ...


8

First of all, these are not typeclasses, they're data types. If you're unfamiliar with the difference, I would recommend reading the relevant chapters in Learn You a Haskell. To solve this particular problem, you just need to pattern match on the different constructors: maybeEither :: Maybe a -> Either () a maybeEither Nothing = ??? maybeEither (Just ...


8

You should call the following Class method: Class.isInstance(Object obj) When you call "instanceof c", "c" should be a Class, not a variable. In your example, c is a variable whose type is Class.


7

Apparently, this has been fixed in Beta 3 so there is no need for workarounds anymore I have found a pure Swift hack: func classFromType<T: NSObject>(type: T.Type) -> AnyObject! { return T.valueForKey("self") //ask for class indirectly... } var clazz: AnyObject = classFromType(NSAttributedString.self) var classes = [clazz] Previous answer ...


7

You can't use casting here, because neither you anonymous type inherited from MyClass nor you have explicit type conversion operator defined for these types. You can use AutoMapper (available from NuGet) to dynamically map between anonymous type and your class var a = new {property1 = "abc", property2 = "def"}; Myclass b = ...


7

item1 = *v[0]; The assignment above doesn't work because the static type of dereferencing v[0] is A, and you're attempting to assign it to a B object. If you know that v[0] contains a pointer to a B object, you can static_cast it. item1 = *static_cast<B*>(v[0]); // note that a copy is stored in item1 If you don't know whether v[0] contains a ...


7

This is talking about a situation where you have an identifier followed by a <. Consider an expression like: if (a->b < c) vs. an expression like: if (a->b<c> /* ... */ ) In the first case, the < is really a less-than sign, so we're comparing a->b to c. In the second, the < is the beginning of a template parameter list, so ...


7

obj2 has the same reference of obj1, so modifying the state of any of these will be reflected in both variables since they're pointing to the same reference. Here's a picture to explain the behavior of object references (explained in this case using Person class): Source: http://stackoverflow.com/a/7034719/1065197 Note that you cannot nullify an int nor ...


7

Constructors allows more complex initialization of fields, that could go far beyond simple assignment.


6

You are not saving your day, month and year. You should do it in the constructor: public Date(int day, int month, int year) { this.day = day; this.month = month; this.year = year; }


6

This is the problem: public Date(int day, int month, int year) { } Your constructor completely ignores its parameters, leaving your fields with their default values. For int fields, that's 0. Instead, it should save the values, e.g. public Date(int day, int month, int year) { this.day = day; this.month = month; this.year = year; } or ...


6

you are correct First of all, Object class is the super/base/parent class of every class including user-defined classes. So even if we don't mention it explicitly, the user-defined classes extends Object class by default. its like class A class B extends A but compiler read it as class A extends Object class B extends A proved for more detail ...


6

Given this makes calls to the methods go from debug(String) to MessageUtil.debug(Plugin, String), which is far more bulky than I would like. Assuming your methods are static, or can be made static, you could use static import - import static mypackage.MessageUtil.debug; // debug("Hello");


6

void createForm(form* f,int c){ f = new Form(c); } will create an object and assign its address to the local f - which is a copy of the original f1 and f2 withing that function's scope. The original pointers are left unchanged, so the following cout<< statements lead to undefined behavior. What you're trying to achieve can be accomplished by ...


6

You misspelled __init__: def __init___(self, age): # 12 345 That's 3 double underscores at the end, not the required 2. As such, Python won't call it as it is not the method it is looking for. If you want to pass in both age and name, give the method another argument, then call the parent __init__ with just the name: class Cat(Animal): def ...


6

The class keyword used there simply declares the symbol Ellipsoid to be a class at the site of its usage. If the compiler already knows that symbol to be a class, it's optional. class Ellipsoid; class MyClass { private: /*class*/ Ellipsoid * ellipse; }; However, the usage you show will prevent compiler errors if the symbol is as-yet ...


6

There's no question of preferred option ClassExample classExample2(); and ClassExample classExample3(void); declares a function returning ClassExample object


6

You ask two questions at once. Java uses references, thus by setting obj2 = obj1, the values are not copied, both references refer to the same object. Setting the value of num through obj1 is the same as setting it through obj2. In memory it looks like: +-----------------+ obj2 -> | Concept | <- obj1 +-----+-----+-----+ ...


6

On the "v7-appcompat" library: preferences -> Android Lint Preferences Search for "Instantiatable" and set to Warning.


6

Enums are your friend. As you've discovered, ints are not appropriate, because they work for only some of the cases (ace through ten), and there's nothing stopping your user from giving an illegal value (negative or greater than 13). Enums can both enforce correct values, and also can also easily associate any numeric value you like. public enum CardRank { ...


5

Yes it's possible. Class[] classes = { SomeObject.class, SomeObject1.class };


5

What you're trying to do isn't going to work. A pointer to a non-static member function is not the same as a pointer to a free function, because unlike the latter, the former must be invoked on an instance of the object. So you cannot declare a variable of one type and assign a pointer to a function of the other type to it. First, let's fix half your code: ...


5

Since you're dynamically allocating the data members texData and texCoords you'll need to follow the Rule of Three, and define a copy constructor and copy assignment operator too, or your code will be very easily broken, as you've discovered. But there's a better way! Do no use raw pointers as data members. Use unique_ptrs to hold them. (It's possible you ...


5

classOf[ClassB] will give you the Class object of ClassB.


5

You're looking for foreach(var item in this).


5

You are telling range() to loop over 0-4 (subtract four from zero), which is -4. Because the default is to start at 0 and count up, that is an empty range: >>> range(0-4) range(0, -4) >>> len(range(0-4)) 0 Use a comma instead, and use 5 to loop 5 times, not 4. The endpoint is not included: >>> len(range(0, 4)) 4 >>> ...


5

Private applies to classes not objects. Any object of class X has access to the private members of all other objects of class X.



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