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4

Convert the prediction to a vector, using c() library('rpart') library('ROCR') setwd('C:\\Users\\John\\Google Drive\\working\\R\\questions') df<-read.csv(file='salary-class.csv',header=TRUE) train = sample(1:nrow(df), nrow(df)/2) train = sample(1:nrow(df), size=0.2*nrow(df)) test = - train training_data = df[train, ] testing_data = df[test, ] fit <- ...


3

One possibility for Indian entities is that the Stanford folk are often happy to add outside training data to the classifiers if it is well formed. For example, two of the three current English models do not recognize "Vihari" in the sentence "Vihari answered my question yesterday." If you compile a list of such sentences and send them to ...


3

svm doesn't handle missing observations and your data set is full of NAs: > dim(data[complete.cases(data), ]) [1] 406 160 You can try to remove columns with NAs and then train svm > data <- data[, which(colSums(apply(data, 2, is.na)) == 0)] > dim(data) [1] 19622 93 Now you can try to split your data and fit svm. I would be careful ...


2

The average argument did not exist before release 0.15, so I'm thinking you must have an old version of scikit-learn. See the change log: "Multi-label classification output in multilabel indicator format is now supported by metrics.roc_auc_score and metrics.average_precision_score by Arnaud Joly." The code runs for me under 0.15.2. See the second answer ...


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This is how you would use TfidfVectorizer(look here for more details) >>> from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import TfidfVectorizer >>> corpus = ['This is the first document.', 'This is the second second document.', 'And the third one.', 'Is this the first document?'] >>> vect = ...


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looks like you are looking for defaultdict. >>> from collections import defaultdict >>> dct = defaultdict(int) >>> dct['foo'] +=1 # no explicit init needed >>> dct['foo'] +=1 >>> dct['foo'] 2 that eliminates your need of 'if already in dict / else' clauses. An alternative would be to use the .setdefault method ...


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You could train the tf-idf on ngrams as well, in addition to the unigrams. In Scikit Learn you can specify the ngram_range that will be taken into account: if you set it to train on up to 3-grams, you would end up storing the frequency for combinations of words such as "In which place", which is pretty indicative about the type of question that is asked.


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As drekyn said you can use the Scikit learn for features extraction here are some examples: >>> bigram_vectorizer = CountVectorizer(ngram_range=(1, 2), ... token_pattern=r'\b\w+\b', min_df=1) >>> analyze = bigram_vectorizer.build_analyzer() >>> analyze('Bi-grams are cool!') == ( ... ['bi', ...


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There are probably many errors here, but the first and most obvious one stands out here: The accuracy is listed as 0 even if I feed my entire dataset into the classifier It's not listed as 0.0? It sounds like something in there that ought to be a float is an int. I suspect you're doing division at some point for a normalization, and the int/int isn't ...


1

Perhaps contacting Pi-Chuan Chang is your best bet for a final answer, but I did look into this a little bit. Answering your questions as best I can: The format of the train/dev/test sets are in the format of the Chinese treebank; I gather it's version 6: https://catalog.ldc.upenn.edu/LDC2007T36 The *.fid files look to be parse trees for sentences. The ...


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http://www.cs.tufts.edu/~ablumer/weka/doc/weka.classifiers.DistributionClassifier.html import weka.classifiers.DistributionClassifier;


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Based on your description of your problem, I see several drawbacks of a Haar or LBP-based detector. First, these features do not use color, which seems to be important here. Second, a classifier using Haar or LBP features is sensitive to in-plane and out-of-plane rotation. If your objects can be in any 3D orientation, you would need to discretize the range ...


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java weka.classifiers.trees.J48 -no-cv -t /some/where/train.arff -d /other/place/j48.model How I got there: java weka.classifiers.trees.J48 --help lists the available options, among others: -no-cv Do not perform any cross validation. So when I use your command and add the -no-cv flag, that seems to do what you want.


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The class you should use to make this easy is NERClassifierCombiner. Its semantics is that it runs the classifiers in order from left to right as you specify them (any number can be given to it in the constructor), and that later classifiers cannot annotate an entity that overlaps with an entity tagging of an earlier classifier, but are otherwise free to add ...


1

Ok, I did some investigation in code. OneVsRestClassifier tries to call decision_function first and if it fails - it goes for predict_proba function of base classifier (svm.svc in our case). As far as I see, my X_test is numpy.array of lists of strings. After it undergoes a sequence of transformations specified in pipeline CountVectorizer -> ...


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This is a well-known issue and by now no easy solution exists. You can use Pipeline to "densify" your sparse data (by calling .toarray), but this can blow up memory consumption. You can do TruncatedSVD (AFAIK, it's the only dimensionality reduction method that works with sparse data), but it can mess with your data so that SVM's performance would decrease.


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Check this, GridSearch gs = new GridSearch(); int requiredIndex = 6; // for accuracy SelectedTag st=new SelectedTag(requiredIndex , weka.classifiers.meta.GridSearch.TAGS_EVALUATION); gs.setEvaluation(st);


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I would ignore that README. The information in it is fairly out of date. A more recent explanation is here: http://nlp.stanford.edu/software/segmenter-faq.shtml The expected input format is one sentence per line with already segmented text on each line. If you get your segmented data from parse trees, there are tools which will convert from parse tree ...


1

The output of an svm are not probabilities! The score's sign indicates whether it belongs to class A or class B. And if the score is 1 or -1 it is on the margin, although that is not particularly useful to know. If you really need probabilities, you can convert them using Platt scaling. You basically apply a sigmoid function to them.


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The first thing you should do is reduce the number of samples (rows). LibSVM provides a very useful python script for that. If your dataset has N samples and you want to downsample it to N - K samples, you can use the aforementioned script to: (1) randomly remove K samples from your data; (2) remove K samples from your data using stratified sampling. The ...


1

For you to train the classifier, you need a matrix X where each row will correspond to an image. If you want to use a coordinate representation, this means all images will have to be of the same size, say, M by N. So, the row of an image will have M times N elements (features) and the corresponding feature values will be the cluster assignments. Class vector ...


1

Since the data is unbalanced, you should either sample an equal number of good/bad (losing lots of "bad" records), or use an algorithm that can account for this. I think there's an SVM implementation in RapidMiner that does this. You should use Cross-Validation to avoid overfitting. You might be using the term overfitting incorrectly here though. You ...


1

I realise this question is old, but it might help anyone with a similar question. If you query the trees for their results, you'll always get the end classifications which are deterministic given an initialised forest. You can extract the probabilities by setting predict all to TRUE as you've done and summing across the votes for a probability. If you ...


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It seems you change the code from the blog's GitHub repository in one detail and it is the cause of your error: c.evaluate(); c.learn(); vs c.evaluate(); c.learn(); The evaluate() method resets the classifier with the line: classifier = new FilteredClassifier(); but doesn't build a model. The actual evaluation uses a copy of the passed classifier, ...


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Your next step should be to cluster the above cleaned txt where each cleaned sentence is a data point. You can use k-means from any of the data mining python libraries to get the clusters. ======== clustering========= Now how do you decide the K in the k-means (i.e. the number of clusters): 1) by plotting the objective curve of the k-means and then ...


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I had the same problem but eventually I got it to work, using this: int waucIndex = 8; SelectedTag st=new SelectedTag(waucIndex , weka.classifiers.meta.GridSearch.TAGS_EVALUATION); search.setEvaluation(st); You can verify that it's set correctly by doing: System.out.println(search.getEvaluation());


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The enhanced reimplementation of ctree() in package partykit also has somewhat more flexible plotting capabilities. Specifically, the node_barplot() panel function gained a mainlab argument that can be used for customizing the main labels. For example for the iris data: library("partykit") ct <- ctree(Species ~ ., data = iris) You can set up a vector ...


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Attempting to deduce semantics purely by looking at individual words out of context is not going to take you very far. In your "watch" examples, the only term which actually indicates that you have "money" semantics is the one you hope to disambiguate. What other information is there in the sentence to help you reach that conclusion, as a human reader? How ...


1

Your result "depends purely on word occurrence" because that is the kind of features your code produces. If you feel that this approach is not sufficient for your problem, you need to decide what other information you need to extract. Express it as features, i.e. as key-value pairs, add them to your dictionary, and pass them to the classifier exactly as you ...


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Also it does not classify Indian entities, so support for such non-english classes too can also be added if this is possible. By "Indian," do you mean Hindi? Neither Stanford NER nor Apache OpenNLP provide named entity models for Hindi, but GATE has support for basic Hindi named entity recognition: ...



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