Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

In Intellij 13, it looks it's slightly different again. Here are the instructions for Intellij 13: click on the Project view or unhide it by clicking on the "1: Project" button on the left border of the window or by pressing Alt + 1 find your project or sub-module and click on it to highlight it, then press F4, or right click and choose "Open Module ...


0

Ok, finally figured it out. There were MULTIPLE problems. 1) Tomcat was running under JVM 1.6, and one of the libraries I was using (from Jersey) required 1.7. 2) The web.xml that I used as an example was from jersey 1, but I'm using jersey 2 - and the package names used in the xml have changed. 3) Eclipse wouldn't let me use 1.7 for the servlet due to ...


0

You do not want to have the log4j.properties packaged with your project deployable -- that is a bad idea, as other posters have mentioned. Find the root Tomcat installation that Eclipse is pointing to when it runs your application, and add the log4j.properties file in the proper place there. For Tomcat 7, the right place is ${TOMCAT_HOME}/lib


-1

Yes you can.. there a way to get the compiler to skip the implicit construction of Tom.java if the class is found in the classpath by just delete that Tom.java file parallel to your Bob.java.. if file is in parallel it will use that one.. else one which is in classpath .. this is because priority always goes to local variable or class or funcation


1

You need to get your xsd file on the classpath. Then you will be be able to read the file the same way regardless whether you are in IntelliJ or running somewhere else. In IntelliJ add the folder to the project classpath the same way you would for a jar file. When you build a jar file to run your application elsewhere include the xsd in the root of the jar ...


1

Add below line to your classpath element <pathelement location="/opt/java/common/servlet-api.jar"/> i.e in your build xml file <javac srcdir="@{srcdir}" destdir="@{destdir}" debug="@{debug}" deprecation="${javac.deprecation}" source="${javac.source}" target="${javac.target}" includeantruntime="false"> ...


0

There are Classes like DocumentBuilderFactory which enables applications to obtain a parser that produces DOM object trees from XML documents & & DocumentBuilder used to obtain DOM Document instances from an XML document. DocumentBuilderFactory - JDK API & DocumentBuilder - JDK API. For demo example : How To Read XML File In Java – (DOM ...


-1

Use System.getProperty("user.dir"); This will give you the pwd and you can navigate from there.


0

Its failing at compile time. try to import "TryJar" in TrySrc.java first.


2

in your way 1: try changing from java -cp ~/jar/TryJar.jar TrySrc to java -cp .:~/jar/TryJar.jar TrySrc to include current directory in classpath as well to be able to load TrySrc


0

You should be alright with any location, as long as you add the Apache commons implementation .jar to the java or javaw classpath. Or in any location where one of your active ClassLoader instances can find it anyway.


1

The namespace is examples.introduction. Also, you don't need to quote the vector inside the ns macro. Try: (ns t (:require [examples.introduction :as ex])) See some examples of use for the ns macro here. Also, it's customary to have at least two segments in namespaces. Yours could be mynamespace.t for example.


1

Your buildfile compiles your code and includes the third-party Jar in the classpath so that the compiler could be able to locate the classes on which your code depends (e.g. org.apache.commons.csv.CSVRecord). Similarly, when running your main class via the java your JVM needs to know where the third-party classes exist. Otherwise the classloader will fail ...


0

You state that the compile is ok, but you don't show how you're running the java program..... So to be clear, ANT completes without error? This is a problem running the java program post compilation from the command line? If I'm correct then there are two problems: Your java program has no main class (required then running from commandline) The jars your ...


0

Your class has no (visible) main method public static void main(String[] args){ IO.readCSVFile(File file) } You need to pass the classpath when running the file java -cp yourclasspath


0

Try the following: <path id="test.classpath"> <fileset dir="C:/bb/" includes="test.jar"/> <path refid="compile.classpath"/> </path> <path id="test1.classpath"> <pathelement location="c:/test1.jar"/> </path> <project name="TestProj" basedir="."> <target name="test"> ...


2

It turns out that they have added a "provided" configuration in the gradle android plugin 0.8.0 but it doesn't quite work. It does add the provided libraries to the compile path automatically, but it also includes them in the final aar/apk. What worked for me was the solution provided by @lukas-hanaceck but by changing the name from "provided" to any other ...


0

This thread deals with a similar issue to yours. In a nutshell here's what you need to do to fix it: In the Class-Path header in your MANIFEST.MF file you need to specify conf/ instead of conf/main.props. For a quick fix just change your mapper to the following: <chainedmapper> <flattenmapper/> <globmapper from="*.props" ...


0

You were perhaps closer with your original answer if you can at least achieve 'classpath is too long' answer. Have you tried nesting your paths in order to make them 'relevant' rather than 'absolute' and thus shorter? perhaps using an alias such as the way you might list 'JAVA_HOME' in your PATH variable? A way to test this quickly from the command line ...


0

Please review the Android and CommonIssues wiki pages for the project as these clarify some common issues with the library. In the meantime, more specifically, I often see this type of issue (though not this exactly) when the library has not been GWT-compiled or if the local server is not running where the Android app is expecting to find it. If you're not ...


0

First of all, don't nest the enum in an interface. It's perfectly fine that it has its own source file named after the enum. Second, I assume you mean XYZ instead of TYPE in your private constructor? Last, you should be able to use it in that way, no matter if compiled via ant or within eclipse or directly using javac. Probably you have not compiled ...


0

Spring will interpret the resource references as relative (to your test class). You should always make sure to use absolute paths in your resource references, i.e.: <value>classpath:/rewards/testdb/schema.sql</value> <value>classpath:/rewards/testdb/test-data.sql</value> (note the initial forward slash in the resource ...


0

For those of you who migrate from Eclipse to IntelliJ or the other way around here is a tip when working with property files or other resource files. Its maddening (cost my a whole evening to find out) but both IDE's work quite different when it comes to looking for resource/propertty files when you want to run locally from your IDE or during debugging. ...


0

Figured it out by grabbing the classpath of the an instance of Model: Model model = new Model(); ClassPool pool = ClassPool.getDefault(); ClassClassPath ccpath = new ClassClassPath(model.getClass()); pool.insertClassPath(ccpath); CtClass ctClass = pool.get("com.project.Model");


4

By adding dependencies in IntelliJ you are in turn configuring the classpath of your application. Create a java project in IntelliJ Open the Project Structure | Module Dependency Add your jar for seaglass LAF to the dependency list in the dialog Add your java code to the project Add the code for applying the seaglass LAF to your program As you start ...


1

I've come across a similar problem before. Try to run the app using activator ui. If you are running on command line, try to run using activator start instead of activator run. Check here for more references: https://typesafe.com/activator/docs


0

Just needed to add the package name to the filepath like Loader.load(stage, "package/FXMLDocument.fxml"); ....


1

You can add this directory to classpath java -cp C:/users/jars/* MAIN_CLASS_NAME you can also use -classpath instead of -cp


1

You might try and pass this option to javac (in addition to the -cp): -Djava.ext.dirs=$DIR/lib to avoid looking at the extensions in $JAVA_HOME. It seems that -cp does not override this.


0

The class you are trying to run and its dependency are on two different classpaths. Test class is rooted inside bin, wheras ConditionalCompilation class is rooted inside the parent directory. One fix is to specify the dependency classpath explicitly. java -classpath bin;. ConditionalCompilation Another fix is to compile to and run from the bin directory. ...


0

The OP apparently didn't look for an Android answer, but some answers are specific to Android. So I suggest you look at this page : http://tools.android.com/tech-docs/new-build-system Version 0.9.0 introduced a provided scope. So, just use dependencies { provided "groupId:artifcatId:version" }


0

I found the answer here on Stack Overflow! I had to go into the build path properties and then go to the ORder tab, and check mark the MyModel project...


0

From the top menu click 'Run' => 'Edit Configurations' Choose the right 'Application' in the left column (if it's not yet selected) Click on 'Configuration' tab in the right hand side column (if it's not yet selected) Click the '...' button to the right of 'Environment variables:' Click the '+' button.


0

You have few options here. Like @Andres said, you either add the JARs in the WAR or you add them to the classpath of Tomcat (ie lib folder). While the concept of having a Maven-aware classloader is interesting, imagine all the possible jar version conflicts that could occur. War A having a provided dependency on Lib v1.0.1 and War B having a provided ...


6

The classpath separator character is different on Linux (and on Unix) than it is on Windows. It's ; on Windows, but it's : on Linux (and Unix). Try this on Linux: javac -cp ".:dependency.jar" File.java java -cp ".:dependency.jar" File


0

Just a quick and untested idea. If you are able to dynamically load your updated jars at runtime, instead of specifying them at the command line, you could create a URLClassLoader for these jars and explicitly load your classes using that custom class loader: URL[] jarurls = new URL[]{jar1,jar2,...}; URLClassLoader customCL= new URLClassLoader (jarurls, ...


3

A dependency is marked as provided when the app server or container already has it, and you don't have to put it in the war. This is the case i.e. for the servlets jar, but not for the spring-context. I think the better solution would be to mark this dependencies as "compile" instead of "provided".


1

If you have a CLASSPATH environment variable set correctly, then you need to execute java org.junit.runner.JUnitCore without the reference to the .jar file. The java application launcher has the following usage java [ options ] class [ arguments ] If you aren't going to specify any options, then the first argument needs to be the class name. In this ...


1

All you have to do is: java -cp "C:\Program Files\junit\junit-4.4.jar";. org.junit.runner.JUnitCore MyMatrixTest


1

Alternate Solution : particularly if you want to know the jar files which have needed class , you can search using WINRAR. Use Find in WinRAR i) Open WinRAR ii) Open lib folder ( which contains all jar files ) in WinRAR iii) Click on Find , type any classname (ex : ClassWriter.class ) iv) Click on OK you will see all the classes which are named ...


1

If you need to load classes at runtime you can use: URLClassLoader child = new URLClassLoader (myJar.toURL(), this.getClass().getClassLoader()); Class classToLoad = Class.forName ("com.MyClass", true, child); Method method = classToLoad.getDeclaredMethod ("myMethod"); Object instance = classToLoad.newInstance (); Object result = method.invoke (instance); ...


0

Assuming your myFile.xml is in resources folder Try reading like this InputStream inputStream = YourClassName.class.getResourceAsStream("/myFile.xml"); BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(inputStream));


0

If you want it accessed from class path you need to put it inside WEB-INF/classes folder. the path is relative to classes folder ie if the file is inside WEB-INF/classes/configs/somefile.xml then classpath:configs/somefile.xml


1

Try <value type="java.io.File">file:///FederationMetadata.xml</value> instead of <value type="java.io.File">classpath:FederationMetadata.xml</value>


0

If you need to generate the classpath as a simple list of jars (without the full path), you can implement a plugin like the one in the example below. My need is to add the classpath in the Manifest using a property other than "Class-Path" because I'm using a tool like Eclipse "JarRsrcLoader" (it's similar to One-JAR) and I want to create a Manifest.MF like ...


0

I tried several different approaches to installing Mockito, following the advice of several sites, but continued to have errors with Gradle build or the test build. I should note that my Android Studio version is 0.6.1. Here is what finally worked for me: I downloaded the jar files myself and added them to a package in my project structure: ../app/libs: ...


0

To actually read the contents of the file, I like using Commons IO + Spring Core: IOUtils.toString(new ClassPathResource("package/resource").getInputStream());


0

The best practice is to create one dll for one jar file.


1

I think it is impossible to do exactly what you want. Lets start with some facts about how classloaders and resource loading work When you call Class.getResource() it turns into a call to Class.getClassloader().getResource(). Each class has exactly one classloader. Each classloader has exactly one parent classloader. The way that classloaders are ...


1

Maven uses the <dependencies/> defined in your project as puts them on the classpath of the plugins. Furthermore, in the <plugin/> section of each plugin, you can define additional <dependencies/> which are only to be used by the plugin (and will therefore not become part of the final artifact in any way, or visible on the mvn ...



Top 50 recent answers are included