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24

I believe those white lines you're seeing are the fadingEdge of the ListView. You can get rid of them by adding this attribute to your ListView in xml: android:fadingEdge="none" or in code: listview.setVerticalFadingEdgeEnabled(false); In ICS and forward, fading edges are disabled by default which is why you don't see them.


18

not in every drag event can get the clip data, but some of them, such as ACTION_DROP type dropableCanvas.setOnDragListener(new OnDragListener() { @Override public boolean onDrag(View v, DragEvent event) { switch (event.getAction()) { case DragEvent.ACTION_DRAG_STARTED: return true; ...


18

If you're doing complex, layered drawing, you can use globalCompositeOperation to emulate clipping in a second, scratch canvas. You can then use drawImage to copy the scratch canvas back into the original canvas. I can't guarantee the performance of this approach, but it's the only way I know to get what you want. //set-up - probably only needs to be done ...


14

Rcpp has clamp for this: cppFunction('NumericVector rcpp_clip( NumericVector x, double a, double b){ return clamp( a, x, b ) ; }') Here is a quick benchmark showing how it performs against other methods discussed : pmin_pmax_clip <- function(x, a, b) pmax(a, pmin(x, b) ) ifelse_clip <- function(x, a, b) { ifelse(x <= a, a, ifelse(x >=...


14

Yes, that w will vary per vertex. Most people imagine the clip space as the cube [-1,1]^3. However, that is not the clip space, but the normalized device space (NDC). You get from clip space to NDC by doing the perspective divide, so dividing each vertex by it's w component. So, in NDC, that clip condition would transform to -1 <= x/w <= 1. However, ...


13

After multiplying by the perspective projection matrix (aka clip matrix) you end up with a homogenious 4-vector [x,y,z,w]. This is called npc (normalized projection coordinates), and also called clip coordinates. To get the 2D coordinates on the screen you typically use something like xscreen = (x/w) * screen_width yscreen = (y/w) * screen_width For ...


12

The following will do exactly what you're looking for. You can use the Up ↑ and Down ↓ keys on your keyboard to navigate forwards and backwards through the animation. XAML <Rectangle x:Name="imgRect"> <Rectangle.Fill> <ImageBrush x:Name="imgBrush" ImageSource="walking_spritesheet.png" Stretch="None" AlignmentX="Left" AlignmentY="...


12

One approach in Silverlight is to use a GeometryGroup and include in the group a very large rectangle starting at a distant negative position. For example the following blue square has smaller square hole:- <Rectangle Fill="Blue" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" Height="200" Width="200"> <Rectangle.Clip> ...


11

My fix for this is to draw a thin (2px) white stroke at the same radius after drawing the image. It covers up the aliasing nicely and looks fine across browsers.


11

Anything is possible, but there probably are easier ways to do what you want without using clip, but if you use jQuery animate's fx.step function, you can animate anything, but you need to do some calculations to figure out values and stuff, but it goes something like this: $(".img1").animate({ fontSize: 100 //some unimportant CSS to animate so we get ...


11

Here's a method with nested pmin and pmax setting the bounds: fenced.var <- pmax( LB, pmin( var, UB)) It will be difficult to find a method that is faster. Wrapped in a function that defaults to a range of 3 and 7: fence <- function(vec, UB=7, LB=3) pmax( LB, pmin( vec, UB)) > fence(1:10) [1] 3 3 3 4 5 6 7 7 7 7


10

Okay, so assuming that you have a UIView subclass, which has an instance variable, image, which is a UIImage, then you can do your drawRect: function like so... - (void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect { [super drawRect:rect]; CGRect _bounds = [self bounds]; CGColorRef aColor; CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext(); // Create a path ...


10

One option is to use raster::mask() library(maptools) ## For wrld_simpl library(raster) ## Example SpatialPolygonsDataFrame data(wrld_simpl) SPDF <- subset(wrld_simpl, NAME=="Brazil") ## Example RasterLayer r <- raster(nrow=1e3, ncol=1e3, crs=proj4string(SPDF)) r[] <- 1:length(r) ## crop and mask r2 <- crop(r, extent(SPDF)) r3 <- mask(r2, ...


9

Webkit changed its behavior recently as pointed out here: http://archivist.incutio.com/viewlist/css-discuss/109662 Indeed as of today it is still an issue in Gecko and maybe other browsers. I managed to fix this nasty problem on Gecko using negative margins which also work on all other browsers. Let's assume you have a screen-wide element (E) with box-...


8

Add this: ... //reset canvas transforms ctx.restore(); ctx.beginPath(); ctx.moveTo(162, 20); ctx.lineTo(162, 320); ctx.lineTo(300, 320); ctx.lineTo(300, 20); ctx.clip(); //change color to blue ctx.fillStyle = "rgb(0,160,212)"; //save current state of canvas ...


8

You can do this but not using clip. Clip only works with paths and text is not a path. You will need to use a second in-memory (not on the page) canvas in order to achieve the effect. Here is how: Make an in-memory canvas, set it to a width and height capable of containing the text Draw the text to that in-memory canvas set the in-memory context's ...


7

I understand you asked this a while ago but I have an answer for you. Your first example was half-correct. Using destination-out will work, however in order not to disturb the canvas you want to draw on, we create a new canvas and draw it in that. Then once we've drawn our shape on there with our cutaways, we then draw the entire canvas onto the original. ...


7

Here's one function that will work for both vectors and matrices. myClip <- function(x, a, b) { ifelse(x <= a, a, ifelse(x >= b, b, x)) } myClip(x = 0:10, a = 3,b = 7) # [1] 3 3 3 3 4 5 6 7 7 7 7 myClip(x = matrix(1:12/10, ncol=4), a=.2, b=0.7) # myClip(x = matrix(1:12/10, ncol=4), a=.2, b=0.7) # [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] # [1,] 0.2 0.4 0....


7

You don't need to use PBS (I have learnt this the hard way, as the r-sig-geo link posted by @flowla was a question originally posted by me!). This code shows how to do it all in rgeos, with thanks to various different postings from Roger Bivand. This would be the more canonical way of subsetting, without resorting to coercion to PolySet objects. The reason ...


7

Cause Insert a beginPath() as rect() adds to the path unlike fillRect()/strokeRect(). What happens here is that the rectangles are accumulating eventually slowing the clipping down over time. This in combination with using setInterval, which is not able to synchronize with monitor/screen refreshes, worsens the problem. To elaborate on the latter: Using ...


6

ahh ... at last I got it (missed the roundBorder for some reason, my fault :-) The button is simply complying to its contract: it states being opaque, so must fill its complete area, including that of the border. So setting a clip (which you could do in paintComponent) would make violate the contract: // DO NOT - a opaque component violates its contract, ...


6

Looks like you need Canvas.drawBitmapMesh . There is a sample in Android SDK showing how to use it. You need to use Matrix for drawing your bitmap on Canvas. You can easily create such transformation which will fit your bitmap image into any quadrangle with Matrix.polyToPoly method. It will look like this: matrix.setPolyToPoly( new float[] { ...


6

Using Transforms (so CSS3 solution only) There is a small amount of imprecision in the following method, and it has two "coding" drawbacks: Two wrappers needed on the img Need to know the size of the image (which may not always be a drawback if images are set sizes or if javascript is used to give width/height info). It does, however, degrade nicely ...


6

this occurs in 4.1.2 and its documented as a bug in Google which they have fixed in 4.2. https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=34432 This happens with unicode fonts where the Android OS is not able to calculate the length of the text.


6

For the circle image you can try adding the following to your css: border-radius: 50%;


6

I made it! (You can see the result here, ScreenToGif > Editor > Image Tab > Cinemagraph) Code SourceFrom() and DpiOf() and ScaledSize(): /// <summary> /// Gets the BitmapSource from the source and closes the file usage. /// </summary> /// <param name="fileSource">The file to open.</param> /// <param name="size">The maximum ...


5

You try to add mask to your image using method below and put it to UIImageView + (UIImage *)image:(UIImage *)img withMask:(UIImage *)maskImg { CGImageRef maskRef = maskImg.CGImage; CGImageRef mask = CGImageMaskCreate(CGImageGetWidth(maskRef), CGImageGetHeight(maskRef), ...


5

First of all, there is no "built-in" way to deal with special file formats. You have to either parse the file yourself, or get some component to do it for you. In fact, parsing is not a hack, provided you code adheres to the documentation. You should get (in case of some companies, buy) the official format specification, and parse the file header according ...


5

Use gIntersects (not gIntersection) with byid = TRUE to get a TRUE/FALSE vector of which points are in your buffer. Then subset your points data frame. Job done.


5

I think you can do this by making multiple scatter plots, clipping each one with a unique patch (eg one has England, one has Ireland, etc). Though this might not be what you asked for, ie "Does anyone know how I can clip using an 'OR' type statement?", it should have the same effect: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib....



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