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16

The difference between CLIPS and Prolog/Datalog is that CLIPS is a "production rule system" that operates by forward chaining: given a set of facts and rules, it will try to make every possible derivation of new facts and store those in memory. A query is then answered by checking whether it matches something in the fact store. So, in CLIPS, if you have ...


9

datalog is a subset of prolog. the subset which datalog carries has two things in mind: adopt an API which would support rules and queries make sure all queries terminate prolog is Turing complete. datalog is not. getting datalog out of the way, let's see how prolog compares with clips. prolog's expertise is "problem solving" while clips is an "expert ...


4

Using Twisted for this sounds like it makes sense. The low-level API that supports running processes in Twisted is reactor.spawnProcess. Some examples of its usage are given in the process howto document. This API is well suited for dealing with many long running processes, and as with all I/O APIs in Twisted, it works well when combined with another ...


4

Use the fact-slot-value function. CLIPS> (deftemplate a-fact (slot id) (slot name)) CLIPS> (defrule a-rule ?f <- (a-fact) => (printout t (fact-slot-value ?f id) " " (fact-slot-value ?f name) crlf)) CLIPS> (assert (a-fact (id 3) (name x))) <Fact-1> CLIPS> (assert (a-fact (id 7) (name y))) <Fact-2> CLIPS> ...


4

I uploaded an Xcode 4.6 project (clips_mab_ios_0_1.zip) at https://sourceforge.net/projects/clipsrules/files/CLIPS/Misc/. It shows how to link the CLIPS code into a static library, load a CLIPS file containing rules, and redirect output to a UITextView.


4

If you're using the load command to load this content, then you're mixing commands (such as clear) with CLIPS constructs (such as deftemplate and defrule). To fix this, first create a file such as book.clp with just constructs: (deftemplate book (multislot surname)(slot name)(multislot title) ) (deffacts initial (book (surname J.P.)(name ...


3

Use the test function to make numerical comparisons. Also, note that CLIPS uses prefix notation for mathematical operators. Here is a simplified rule that does what you want: (defrule MAIN::btwn100and120 (part-credits ?val) (test (<= ?val 120)) (test (>= ?val 100)) => (printout t "Value " ?val " is in range." crlf) ) And here is a test ...


3

I received some help on the PyClips support group. The solution is to ensure your Python function returns a clips.Symbol object and use (test ...) to evaluate functions in the LHS of rules. The use of Reset() also appears to be necessary to activate certain rules. import clips clips.Reset() user = True def py_getvar(k): return (clips.Symbol('TRUE') if ...


3

CLIPS> (defglobal ?*security* = 0) CLIPS> (defrule rule1 (human_resources n) => (bind ?*security* (+ ?*security* 1))) CLIPS> (reset) CLIPS> ?*security* 0 CLIPS> (assert (human_resources n)) <Fact-1> CLIPS> (run) CLIPS> ?*security* 1 CLIPS>


3

First create a string containing the rule (or any other construct) and then use the build function: CLIPS> (deftemplate action (slot prev) (slot curr) ) CLIPS> (defrule test (action (prev ?p)) => (build (str-cat "(defrule test_inner (action (curr " ?p ")) => (printout t ...


3

Place the commands you want executed in a file. For example, the contents of run.bat is the following: (load file1.clp) (load file2.clp) (reset) (run) If you're using a command line version, you can execute the contents of the batch file using one of the following two commands: clips -f run.bat clips -f2 run.bat Using the -f option will echo the ...


2

Basically this is the entire field of "knowledge engineering;" it's really as broad a question as "given a domain, how do I architect application software for that domain?" Whole books have been written on this topic. Here are three that treat this topic well IMO: Peter Norvig's "Artificial Intelligence, A Modern Approach", Giarratano and Riley's "Expert ...


2

mm is "minus minus", the standard trope for a C++ "founding" pkg (as in eg c-- itself). This is on the one hand in cognitive dissonance with its failure to be just standard C++ with no external dependencies and on the other hand consonant with its use of glibmm. It's vacuous and these dependencies are a major hassle, but I don't know of anything better for ...


2

You can modify it with (modify <fact-specifier> <RHS-slot>*) Yes, with function (random [<start-integer-expression> <end-integer-expression>]). Also commendable to set the seed before As far as i know, you can't. Rules are only fired from the agenda You can check if a fact exists with (fact-existp <fact-address-or-index>)


2

You can just use boolean clauses: (assert (myTemp (one asd) (second jhg)) (myTemp (one asd) (second kjh)) (myTemp (one bvc) (second jhg)) (myTemp (one bvc) (second jhg) (third qwe))) (find-fact ((?p myTemp)) (or (eq ?p:one bvc) (eq ?p:third qwe)) (<Fact-4>) (find-fact ((?p myTemp)) (or (eq ?p:one bvc) (eq ?p:second jhg)) ...


2

The multislot hobby in person is declared correctly. But your rule won't match the hobbies correctly and would match the same fact to the same fact showing that Jane is compatible with Jane. Actually if the rule matched facts it would generate the Cartesian product of the person facts (or a large number of non-desired matches). I modified the rule to: ...


2

In versions 6.24 and earlier, when the not conditional element was the first pattern in a rule, the pattern (initial-fact) was added before it (this is described in section 5.4.9, Automatic Addition and Reordering of LHS CEs, in the Basic Programming Guide). The (initial-fact) fact is asserted when a (reset) command is performed. I think this is the cause of ...


2

Pattern matching for this rule occurs whenever the fact set-count is asserted or modified. The rule is fired some time afterwards, during the call to run. These two processes can be widely separated in time. The value of ?*v* can of course change during that long period of time. The key is to realize that he printed results will reflect the value of ?v from ...


2

There is no need to exit CLIPS. You can just issue the (clear) command (which has the same effect as exiting and restarting CLIPS), then (load ) (reset) (run).


2

Here's how you would typically do it with a simple comparison: CLIPS> (clear) CLIPS> (deftemplate fact (slot name) (slot value)) CLIPS> (deffacts test-data (fact (name data-1) (value 3)) (fact (name data-2) (value 1)) (fact (name data-3) (value 2)) (fact (name data-4) (value 2)) (fact (name data-5) (value 4)) (fact (name data-6) ...


2

There are two issues you need to deal with. The first is that the patterns you defined can match the same fact multiple times (e.g., sensor L1 will be bound to a, b, and c). To get around this, you need to ensure that a, b, and c are unique. One way to do this is as follows (note that I also added a missing "(" in front of your printout statement): ...


2

Here's another way to do it: (deftemplate sensor (slot id) (slot value)) (deffacts listaSenzor (sensor (id L1) (value 0)) (sensor (id L2) (value 0)) (sensor (id L3) (value 1)) (sensor (id L4) (value 1)) (sensor (id L5) (value 1)) (sensor (id L6) (value 1)) (sensor (id L7) (value 0)) (sensor (id L8) (value 1)) (sensor (id ...


2

Use this: (if [condition] then (printout t "yikes 3" crlf) (halt)) Where [condition] would be something like a variable, ?b, or an expression, (> 3 4). In the printout statement, t is the logical name which indicates where the output should be directed (in this case t indicates standard output) and crlf prints a carriage return/line feed (new ...


2

Conflict resolution does not prevent both rules from firing - it just determines which is fired first. If you only want one of the two rules to fire, then you should either retract testfact1 in the RHS of the selected rule or remove the other rule from the agenda by some other means (e.g., using a control fact).


2

CLIPS> (deffacts start (get-next-input)) CLIPS> (defrule get-input ?f <- (get-next-input) => (printout t "Input (end to stop)? ") (bind ?input (readline)) (if (neq ?input "end") then (retract ?f) (assert (get-next-input)) (assert (user-input ?input)))) CLIPS> (reset) CLIPS> (run) Input (end to ...


2

Use create$ to place multiple values within a multifield value. You can then use nth$ to retrieve individual values: CLIPS> (deffunction direction () (return (create$ 1 -1))) CLIPS> (direction) (1 -1) CLIPS> (nth$ 1 (direction)) 1 CLIPS> (nth$ 2 (direction)) -1 CLIPS>


2

Some suggest revisions: (defrule determine-closing-date (not (day-to-close ?)) (billing-size ?billing-size) (unpaid-invoices-number ?unpaid-invoices-number) => (if (or (< ?billing-size 1000000) (< ?unpaid-invoices-number 1000000)) then (assert (day-to-close MtTh)) else (assert (day-to-close friday)))) ...


2

Updating to the newest clips version(6.30). #include "clips.h" #define BUFFER_SIZE 1024 int main( int argc, char *argv[]){ DATA_OBJECT factlist; char factBuffer[BUFFER_SIZE+1]; int end,i; void *multifieldPtr; void *theEnv; theEnv = CreateEnvironment(); EnvBuild(theEnv, "(deffacts initial (colors red green blue) (animals cat dog chicken))"); ...


2

There is a function called check-syntax (and C API equivalent CheckSyntax) that can tell you whether a construct is semantically correct: CLIPS> (check-syntax "(deftemplate point (slot x) (slot y))") FALSE CLIPS> (check-syntax "(defrule print (point (slot ?x) (slot ?y)) =>)") (" [PRNTUTIL2] Syntax Error: Check appropriate syntax for defrule. ...


2

Use the matches command: CLIPS> (deftemplate objct (slot name) (slot location) (slot used)) CLIPS> (deffacts initial (objct (name x) (location player) (used 0)) (objct (name y) (location elsewhere) (used 1)) (objct (name z) (location player) (used 0)) (input have) (input want) (input possession) (input thing)) ...



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