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57

This is a mix of three different factors: The particular type system of the jvm The need for slightly different semantics for different use cases when defining types The fact that some of these were developed earlier, and some later, as the language has evolved. So first, let's consider what these do. deftype and genclass are similar in that they both ...


36

In Leiningen tutorial there is following statement For projects that include some Java code, you can set the :java-source-path key in project.clj to a directory containing Java files. Then the javac compiler will run before your Clojure code is AOT-compiled, or you can run it manually with the javac task. so it should work out of box if ...


35

As of Leiningen 2.x, :java-source-path has been replaced with :java-source-paths, whose value is now specified as a vector rather than a string. A good place to find a full (up-to-date) documentation of Leiningen features is to peruse the sample project file. In this case, you will see: :java-source-paths ["src/main/java"]


25

The short answer is that they all have different and useful purposes. The complexity is due to the need to interoperate effectively with different features of the underlying JVM. If you don't need any Java interop then 99% of the time you are best off sticking with either defrecord or a simple Clojure map. Use defrecord if you want to use protocols ...


21

Clojure makes the java Collections seq-able, so you can directly use the Clojure sequence functions on the java.util.HashMap. But assoc expects a clojure.lang.Associative so you'll have to first convert the java.util.HashMap to that: (assoc (zipmap (.keySet m) (.values m)) "key" "value") Edit: simpler solution: (assoc (into {} m) "key" "value")


17

If you're interfacing with Java code, you might have to bite the bullet and do it the Java way, using .put. This is not necessarily a mortal sin; Clojure gives you things like do and . specifically so you can work with Java code easily. assoc only works on Clojure data structures because a lot of work has gone into making it very cheap to create new ...


13

Clojure deals only with long integers internally. (int) is used to cast a long to an int for calling Java methods that expect an int argument. In this case (int 10) does indeed return a Java int, but Clojure then promotes the int back to a long. (type) uses (class) to find out the type of its argument (in this case), and therefore the long gets boxed into a ...


13

Use gen-class when you want a named class or you want to add new methods to objects you create. gen-class relies on AOT compilation. When you want an anonymous, one-off implementation of a type you use reify or proxy. They do not rely on AOT compilation. Here are their differences: reify only supports protocols or interfaces, proxy also supports ...


12

The function bean came to mind: Takes a Java object and returns a read-only implementation of the map abstraction based upon its JavaBean properties. Example taken from the site: user=> (import java.util.Date) java.util.Date user=> (def *now* (Date.)) #'user/*now* user=> (bean *now*) {:seconds 57, :date 13, :class java.util.Date, :minutes ...


10

Since Java varargs are actually arrays, you can call vararg functions in Clojure by passing an array. You could convert a Clojure seq (maybe by using Clojure's variety of variable argument functions) into an array: (TestClass/aStaticFunction (into-array Integer [(int 1),(int 2)])) or (defn a-static-function-wrapper [& args] ...


9

No need for reflection or maps. Every Java enum has a static valueOf method that retrieves an enum value by name. So: (defn do-something-parameterized [suit] (let [s (Suit/valueOf (name suit))] ...)) Using (name) allows either strings or keywords to be used: (do-something-parameterized "HEARTS") (do-something-parameterized :HEARTS)


8

You can have partial in your case, use (memfn). (memfn myMethod args) In the REPL: user=> (doc memfn) ------------------------- clojure.core/memfn ([name & args]) Macro Expands into code that creates a fn that expects to be passed an object and any args and calls the named instance method on the object passing the args. Use when you want to treat ...


7

Have you tried running it with trampoline? lein trampoline run Seems to work for me. AFAIK "lein trampoline" doesn't nest the JVM, so your Ctrl-C isn't caught by leiningen, but by your code.


7

int is a cast to primitive integer for interop calls. Since each of type calls takes an Object things get boxed again and Clojure (>= 1.3) boxes to Long and Double. If you need an Integer you have to create one. user=> (type (Integer/valueOf 10)) java.lang.Integer


7

Clojure's lazy seqs chunk about 30 items so the little overhead is further reduced. It's not the purist's choice but a practical one. Consult "The Joy of Clojure" for an ordinary solution to realize one element at time. Lazy seqs aren't a perfect match for impure functions for the reason you encountered. Clojure will also evaluate strictly, but with ...


7

From http://clojure.org/datatypes on deftype and defrecord: fields can have type hints, and can be primitive note that currently a type hint of a non-primitive type will not be used to constrain the field type nor the constructor arg, but will be used to optimize its use in the class method constraining the field type and constructor ...


6

In addition to gen-class, proxy and reify, we have defrecord and deftype. These latter two options should be your first choices for the creation of named java classes (and in the case of defrecord, your first choice for any kind of struct with named components.) The datatypes page on clojure.org is a good reference on this topic. Defrecord, deftype and ...


6

In order to be able to use the class defined in Example.java, you have to compile it and place the resulting class file on the classpath. If this Java file is a helper in a Clojure project, you can use Leiningen to automate the process: (defproject foo "1.2.3-SNAPSHOT" ; ... :java-source-paths ["src/main/java"] ) Assuming Example.java lives in a ...


5

The fastest and most straightforward would be to use iterator-seq. This does beg the question: Why doesn't core Clojure provide a protocol like SeqSource that would be called by seq. Then non-standard collections could be "extended" to supply a seq, similar to how the InternalReduce works for reduce.


5

You might be looking for something like: (byte-array (mapcat seq my-sequence-of-byte-arrays))


5

All I see here is an empty binding form with no code. The variable binding goes out of scope once you leave the binding form. Based on your error message, it looks like you're trying to use the image var outside of the binding form. You need to make sure that all code that uses image is placed inside the binding. So, instead of this: (binding [*image* (.. ...


5

The issue is not in the code sample you have. *out* should refer to clojure.core/*out*, so if you are running this in a repl you might have run something previous, to what you have, like (def *out* something) to create a user/*out*. Then, when you defined your print-logger function, the (binding [*out* writer] ...) statement would be trying to rebind ...


4

Your code is not lazy as it would be if you were using Iterable but you can fill the gap with lazy-seq as follows. (defn query-seq [q] (lazy-seq (when-let [val (.next q)] (cons val (query-seq q))))) Maybe you shoul wrap the query method to protect yourself from the first null value as well.


4

Why not just create the enum in Java? Sometimes falling back to Java is the simplest answer. Here is a very old thread about using proxy to define enums from Rich Hickey and Stuart Sierra along with some alternatives using gen-class. I think the proxy path should work with something like this for you: (proxy [Enum org.neo4j.graphdb.RelationshipType] [ ...


4

It's totally OK to use the java hash map in the traditional way. (do (. m put "key" "value") m) This is not idiomatic Clojure code, plus I'm modifying m instead of creating a new map. You are modifying a data structure that really is intended to be modified. Java's hash map lacks the structural sharing that allows Clojures map's to be efficiently copied. ...


4

Seems like a good fit for lazy-seq: (defn query [file query] (.query (JavaCustomFileReader. file) query)) (defn record-seq [query] (when query (when-let [v (.next query)] (cons v (lazy-seq (record-seq query)))))) ;; usage: (record-seq (query "filename" "query params"))


4

Without dropping to lazy-seq: (defn record-seq [q] (take-while (complement nil?) (repeatedly #(.next q)))) Instead of (complement nil?) you could also just use identity if .next does not return boolean false. (defn record-seq [q] (take-while identity (repeatedly #(.next q)))) I would also restructure a little bit the entry points. (defn query ...


4

Java variable length arguments actually want an array as input. So in Clojure the call should be something like: (TestClass/aStaticFunction (into-array Integer some-sequence-of-integers))


4

Use proxy to extend the class and make it implement ISeq


4

It expands first to (.charAt "string"), which indeed is last. Then that form further expands to (. "string" charAt).



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