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35

ClojureQL and clojure.contrib.sql are two quite different libraries. The first aims to implement the primitives from relational algebra and compile those to SQL92. It also offer an extensible compiler that can be adapted to database specific SQL dialect. The second is a lightweight set of helpers for using JDBC from Clojure code. Querying ...


17

I asked this question quite a while ago, but I ran across the following and decided to add it as an answer in case anyone is interested: http://sqlkorma.com/


9

The "obvious" reason you don't need ORM as such in Clojure is because idiomatic Clojure doesn't have objects, per se. The best way to represent data in a Clojure program is as lazy seqs of simple data strutures (maps & vectors). Mapping these to SQL rows is much less complex, and has much less of an impedance mismatch, than full-blown ORM. Also, ...


6

You can write your own between (defmacro between [x min max] `(and (< ~min ~x) (< ~x ~max))) This will be compatible with ClojureQL.


4

There is no BETWEEN, and while you might be tempted to use Lisp-y multiple-argument <, that does not work either: ;; invalid SQL output hello-cql.core> (select (table :abc) (where (< 10 :a 20))) SELECT abc.* FROM abc WHERE (10 < a < 20) ;; valid SQL output hello-cql.core> (select (table :abc) (where (and (< 10 :a) (< :a 20)))) ...


4

There's still no high-level library to create complex relational queries that I know of. There's many ways to tackle this problem (the link you provided is one way) but even if ClojureQL provides a really nice DSL you can build upon, it still miss some important features. Here's a quick and dirty example of a macro that generate imbricated joins: (defn ...


4

The issue is that macros are not functions - they run at compile time and are passed the actual syntax (lists and symbols, primarily), so you can't apply them at runtime to runtime datastructures. Thus, (apply or my-list) throws an error. You have a few options: (def my-list (list false false 4 false 5)) (some identity my-list) -- returns 4 (reduce #(or ...


3

You need to use the in predicate from the predicates namespace, e.g. (require '[clojureql.core :as ql]) (require '[clojureql.predicates :as pred]) (ql/select (ql/table :foo) (ql/where (pred/in :id [1 5 7])))


3

Looks to me like you're passing the wrong thing to macroexpand: you should probably use: (macroexpand '(ss (= :type "special"))) i.e. you ony need one quote at the beginning to quote the entire expression.


3

The difference between using deref (the @ symbol) versus with-results is quite subtle. Basically both do the same thing, the only difference being at which moment the query is actually executed. Both are actually just wrappers for the apply-on method of the Relation protocol, here's the code for with-results: (defmacro with-results [[results tble] & ...


2

In ClojureQL you can call a function like this: :function/col So something like this should work according to the documentation: (select (table :users) (where (= :LOWER/name john)))


2

You cannot pass runtime arguments to macros since the former are only known at - well - runtime, while the latter are already expanded and compiled at - well - compile time. You must use a function. (defn get-users-by-type [t] (cql/select (cql/table db "users_table") (cql/where (= :type t))))


2

ClojureQL is meant for generating the Data Manipulation part of SQL, CRUDing data, but not structure. To generate and execute the Data Definition side of SQL under Clojure, have a look at the Lobos library, which is being made to compliment ClojureQL in this regard.


2

IIRC, ClojureQL doesn't have any support for manipulation of database schemas. It's pretty much geared only towards insertion and querying.


1

Have you checked out the Korma library http://sqlkorma.com/ ? It allows you to define table relationships and abstract over joins. I think a major reason there aren't any ORM's for clojure is because they go against Rich Hickey's ideas of simplicity that the language was founded on. Check out this talk: http://www.infoq.com/presentations/Simple-Made-Easy


1

ClojureQL is mainly for querying. There is some support for insert (conj! table records) and delete (disj! table predicate), but the main thing it does is to provide an interface to SQL based on the relational operators project,select and rename. To do the queries you're asking for, you can drop into clojure.java.jdbc, which ClojureQL uses under the hood. ...


1

I see that you have opened a ticket on Github and I'll follow up there. I will however let you know, that the correct way to insert is simply by omitting the keys which have default values, ie: (ql/conj! recipe-table {:name "a" :instructions "b"}) If you would be so kind as to post the SQL code which generates the exact table you're working with, I'll be ...


1

If the amount of parameters you are giving or is known, this is probably the easiest solution: (apply #(or %1 %2) [nil 10]) ; => 10


1

It seems like it may have been a bug in ClojureQL itself, I've updated my project.clj to include ClojureQL 1.1.0-SNAPSHOT rather than 1.0.0 and it's corrected the issue.


1

No, these methods are directly executing their respective prepared statements. They are all pretty basic. For conj! and update-in!, look at format call in the conj-rows and update-vals functions that you can find inside the internal namespace: (format "INSERT INTO %s %s VALUES (%s)" (to-tablename table) columns template) (format "UPDATE %s SET ...



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