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10

You are using a quadratic algorithm: project [] = error "Empty list of points" project [_] = error "Single point is given" project ps = go 10000 ps where go a [_] = a go a (p:ps) = let a2 = min a $ minimum [distance p q | q<-ps] in a2 `seq` go a2 ps You should use a better algorithm. Search computational-geometry tag on ...


9

Thanks to John Vinyard for suggesting scipy. After some good research and testing, here is the solution to this question: Prerequisites: Install Numpy and SciPy 1)Import the SciPy and Numpy Modules 2)Make a copy of the 5 dimensional array including JUST the X and Y values. 3)Create an instance of a cKDTree as such: ...


5

It's possible to slightly modify your bruteforce search to get better performance on random data. Main idea is to sort points by x coordinate and, while comparing distances in loop, consider only points that have horizontal distance not grater than current minimum distance. This could be order of magnitude faster but in the worst case it is still O(n^2). ...


4

Point is not a valid type. You meant struct Point. Alternatively, you could use a typedef: typedef struct { int x, y; } Point;


3

Fast Algorithm using a KD-Tree This algorithm creates a kd-tree and then finds the closest pair for each point. Creating the kd-tree is O(n log2n), and finding the closest neighbour of a point is O(logn). Credit must go to Wikipedia, which in one article explains how to create kd-trees and also how to use them to find the closest neighbour. import ...


3

I'm afraid you have to sort the points, which takes you at least O(n*log(n)) time (unless you can use bucket sort), so I doubt you find faster algorithm for this.


3

This problem is a variant of the nearest neighbor search problem. The simplest solution is to compute the distance from the origin to all N points and then find the K that are nearest using for example the quickselect algorithm, giving a time and space complexity of O(n).


3

You can improve your algorithm significantly by using a more complex data structure for instance a k-d tree. Still if what you expect to do is to simply search once for the nearest neighbour, you can not possibly perform better than iterating over all points. What you can do, though is optimize the function that computes the distance and also(as mentioned ...


3

Don't use getGraphics to perform Custom painting, this is not how painting in Swing is done Instead, override the JPanels paintComponent method and put your custom painting within it Take a look at Performing Custom Painting for more details


3

You can build a kd-tree for the first array of points and then find the closest point from the first array for each point of the second array using this tree. It works in O(n log n) on avarage(n is the size of the largest of two arrays). To use kd-tree, you can convert your initial coordinates into 3D-space coordinates.


2

Assuming that you have a table Wifi with columns: id, placeName, locationCoord (geography): CREATE TABLE [dbo].[WiFi]( [id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL, [placeName] [varchar](500) NULL, [locationCoord] [geography] NULL, CONSTRAINT [PK_WiFi] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([id] ASC)) Here the locationCoord is a geography type. Lets say the input is a latitude and ...


2

The answer to your question was in the next paragraph of the wikipedia article: It turns out that step 4 may be accomplished in linear time. Again, a naive approach would require the calculation of distances for all left-right pairs, i.e., in quadratic time. The key observation is based on the following sparsity property of the point set. ...


2

There is an obvious algorithm which works in O(n^2). 1) perform Delaunay triangluation - O(n log n), so we get a planar graph. As it is Delaunay triangluation, which maximises the minimum angle, it is clear that the closest 3 points must be connected by at least 2 edges (but they don't necessarily need to form the triangle!). Otherwise there would be more ...


2

This problem is similar to the classical problem of finding the closest pair in a set of points. You can adapt the worst-case O(n log n) algorithms that solve the closest-pair problem to solve this one. The specific problem was featured in Google's Code Jam competition. Here is a resume of the analysis: The number of points can be pretty large so we ...


2

This looks like a nearest neighbor questions like you have a set S of n points in 2 dimensions, and a query point q. Which point in S is the closest one to q. I think if you are dealing with not that many links (less than hundred links), then simple approach is the best (the one that you just have. Scan through each of them and calculate the distance, and ...


2

It's not possible to do this faster than O(N) because you do need to check each link. I can think of faster algorithms if you were doing this check lots of times, (e.g. if you were highlighting the closest link every time the mouse moved); but those have one-off start-up costs that are worse than a simple check. Does it really matter that it's an O(N) ...


2

Notice that you can always reduce the 2D case to the 1D case by performing a rotation transformation. Unfortunately I don't think you can do better than O(nlogn) in the general case. Your best option would be to sort them and then traverse the list.


2

CGRect bigframe = CGRectInset(bigView.frame, -padding.x, -padding.y); BOOL isIntersecting = CGRectIntersectsRect(smallView.frame, bigFrame);


2

For each point of one set find closest point in other set. While doing this, keep only one pair of points having minimal distance between them. This reduces given problem to other one: "Algorithm to find for all points in set A the nearest neighbor in set B", which could be solved using sweep line algorithm over (1) one set of points and (2) Voronoi diagram ...


2

We are really looking for points that are inside of a circle of center (x,y) and radius d. The square that encloses circle is a square of center (x,y) and sides 2d. Any point out of this square does not need to be checked, it's out. So, a point a (xa, ya) is out if abs(xa - x) > d or abs (ya -yb) > d. Same for the square that is enclosed by that circle is ...


2

Evgeny's answer works, but it's a lot of effort without library support: compute a full Voronoi diagram plus an additional sweep line algorithm. It's easier to enumerate for both sets of points the points whose Voronoi cells intersect the separating line, in order, and then test all pairs of points whose cells intersect via a linear-time merge step. To ...


2

If you only have sample distances, not original point locations in a plane you can operate on, then I suspect you are bounded at O(E). Specifically, it would seem from your description that any valid solution would need to inspect every edge in order to rule out it having something interesting to say, meanwhile, inspecting every edge and taking the smallest ...


2

I suggest using ideas that are derived from quickly solving k-nearest-neighbor searches. The M-Tree data structure: (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-tree and http://www.vldb.org/conf/1997/P426.PDF ) is designed to reduce the number distance comparisons that need to be performed to find "nearest neighbors". Personally, I could not find an implementation ...


2

Depending on how you look at the task, here are two different approaches Minimum Distance to Each Row in Second Matrix Two ways to look at this: (1) closest point in A for each point in B, or (2) closest point in B for each point in A. Closest point in A For each point in B you can find the closest point in A (e.g. Euclidean distance), as requested in ...


2

This is comment not answer. Use this output when you check your algorithm. Python code: import itertools data = [ 0.000000, #data[0] 0.000051, #data[1] 0.000076, #data[2] 0.000102, #data[3] 0.000152, #data[4] 0.000178, #data[5] 0.000203, #data[6] 0.000229, #data[7] 0.000254, #data[8] 0.000279, #data[9] 0.000305, #data[10] 0.000356, #data[11] 0.000381, ...


2

What I understand from the question is that you wanna find closest pair of point. There is an algorithm Closest pair of points problem to solve this. Closest Pair of a set of points: Divide the set into two equal sized parts by the line l, and recursively compute the minimal distance in each part. Let d be the minimal of the two minimal ...


2

The steps are a bit misleading, in that steps 2-5 are all part of the recursion. At every level of recursion, you need to calculate dLmin, dRmin, and dLRmin. The minimum of these is returned as the answer for that level of recursion. To use your example, you would calculated dLmin as the distance between points 1 and 2, dRmin as the distance between points ...


1

Check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closest_pair_of_points_problem which mentions clearly where the O(n) comes from (Planar case).


1

first of all use a map and ask the user to set his approximate location, get that values, with this code get the distance to each store: google.maps.geometry.spherical.computeDistanceBetween (latLngA, latLngB); from https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/javascript/reference?hl=en-US#spherical now choose the shorter and output it but I'd rather ...


1

try this : POWER(SIN((37.7907 – abs(dest.longitude)) EDIT2: SELECT *,3956 * 2 * ASIN(SQRT( POWER(SIN((122.4058 - abs(dest.latitude)) * pi()/180 / 2),2) + COS(122.4058 * pi()/180 ) * COS( abs(dest.latitude) * pi()/180) * POWER(SIN((37.7907 - abs(dest.longitude)) * pi()/180 / 2), 2) )) as dis FROM company as dest HAVING dis <10 ORDER BY dis ...



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