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4

Note: please feel free to reword this answer to make it sound better, I probably haven't explained it well. Example 1 ("Bad" singleton) In your first example: function Universe() { var instance = this; this.start_time = 0; this.bang = "Big"; Universe = function () { return instance; }; } When you call new Universe() the ...


4

Closures in Go are lexically scoped. This means that any variables referenced within the closure from the "outer" scope are not a copy but are in fact a reference. A for loop actually reuses the same variable multiple times, so you're introducing a race condition between the read/write of the s variable. But x is allocating a new variable (with the :=) and ...


2

My question is how does the closure remembers the environment in which it was created ( I mean it must be saved somewhere, but how and where ?? ). It's part of the function object created for the closure. A property (that you can't access) that has a reference to what the spec calls the binding object of the execution context in which the function was ...


2

The error : Error in daten.asset[[s]] : object of type 'closure' is not subsettable. Means you are calling the daten.asset function (closure) as a data.frame or matrix (subsettable). Changing daten.asset[[s]] to daten.asset()[[s]] should resolve the problem.


1

The problem is your Pair closure needs to be able to return two different types of objects: an int if you ask for the "con", and the next closure in line if you ask for the "crd". Here's one possible implementation: Use a dynamic so that you can return either. public static Func<string, dynamic> Pair(int x, Func<string, dynamic> y) { ...


1

As @Owen Hartnett suggested I'm moving solution from answer itself here: Okay, after another hour of debugging it turns out reason is pretty silly. As I said I'm porting my code, so previously I was using this class as bridged objective-c code, therefore this function: -(void)pingHostname:(NSString*)hostName andResultCallBlock:(void(^)(NSString* ...


1

No, this is not currently possible. If it were possible, the syntax you'd expect would be: public typealias ArrayClosure<T> = (array:[T]?) -> Void You would then use it like ArrayClosure<Int>. But it's not currently legal. That said, I don't really recommend these type aliases. They obscure more than they illuminate. Compare this ...


1

Your method to address the "issue of this" is OK: function SomeClass() { this.prop = 42; document.body.addEventListener('click', (function() { alert(this.prop); // works }).bind(this)); } new SomeClass(); You really are not doing anything wrong if you found you need doing this, but depending on context, if you are worried about ...


1

Are there gotchas with this method? No, it's fine. I'd even argue that there are less gotchas than with bind (and its ES3 non-support). A pitfall that is sometimes seen is to forget var (and introducing a global variable if not in strict mode), but if you understood closures that's probably not a problem any more. Or does the fact that I have to do ...


1

This looks like some unfortunate problem in type inference. If you do this: let mut all_rerankers: Vec<|str: &str, kwd: &str| -> MatchScore> = Vec::new(); all_rerankers.push(match_full); all_rerankers.push(match_partial); all_rerankers.push(match_regex); all_rerankers.push(close_camel_case); Then everything is fine. The duplication is ...


1

Just try with: public function generate() { $wallet = null; $this->ssh->run([ '~/Web/gatewayd/gateway generate_wallet' ], function($line) use ($fn, &$wallet) { $wallet = data $line.PHP_EOL; }); return json_decode($wallet); }


1

The contextmanager isn't fussy about exception handling; it just wants you to only yield once. Context managers don't support reentry. If you want that, you have several options. One is to use a with-for combo: from contextlib import contextmanager class MutableValue: def __init__(self, value): self.value = value @contextmanager def ...


1

The problem is that you have confused TableViewDataSource with TableViewCellConfigure in your init. This compiles fine for me: typealias TableViewCellConfigure = (cell: AnyObject, item: AnyObject) -> Void // At outer level class TableViewDataSource: NSObject/*, UITableViewDataSource */ { // Protocol commented out, as irrelevant to question var ...



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