Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

A closure is something many JavaScript developers use all the time, but we take it for granted. How it works is not that complicated. Understanding how to use it purposefully is complex. At it's simplest definition (as other answers have pointed out), a closure is basically a function defined inside another function. And That inner function has access to ...


1

Like this: public var reloadFRCsNeedToPerformWhenFail : [()->()] = [] If you use a type alias to make ()->() a type, you can do it your way: public typealias VoidVoid = ()->() public var reloadFRCsNeedToPerformWhenFail = [VoidVoid]() Or, forego the [] shortcut notation and use the full generic: public var reloadFRCsNeedToPerformWhenFail = ...


0

2 and 3's ambiguity seems to be due to Swift compiler bugs, as is using menuItems[0].closure directly which causes compiler segmentation faults. 1 works fine once I remove the parentheses for the tuple, which also seems non-logical. menuItems.append(title: "any", closure: {}) Anyway I expect this to change/break in future Swift/compiler updates.


0

I have understood my mistake var titleFormatterBlock: HMTitleFormatterBlock = {(control: AnyObject!, title: String!, index: UInt, selected: Bool) -> NSAttributedString in NSAttributedString *attString = [[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:title attributes:@{NSForegroundColorAttributeName : [UIColor blueColor]}]; return attString; } ...


2

Yes memory leaks will be prevented, and you can be even more concise by ditching the local variable el and directly assign the onclick property of the element: function addHandler(){ document.getElementById('el').onclick = function(){ this.style.backgroundColor = 'red'; }; } So, inside the onclick callback, this references the element itself on ...


2

I have virtually the same solution as Kenneth. He beat me to it. The only extra thing I'd add is that getting the items out again you can't write menuItems[0].closure you must declare a constant or variable for menuItems[0] first, otherwise the Playground goes haywire (and I suspect therefore it would cause problems in an app too). I'm guessing that it is ...


2

I suspect it's an ambiguity concerning the type of the tuple. If you define a typealias the problem goes away: typealias MenuItem = (title: String, closure: () -> Void) var menuItems: [MenuItem] = [] var item: MenuItem = (title: "any", closure: {}) let item2: MenuItem = (title: "another", closure: {}) menuItems.append(item) menuItems.append(item2)


1

If dispatch_group_leave call isn't balanced with dispatch_group_enter then crash may happen.


2

This should work: children.each do |c| parent = self c.send(:define_method, :frob) do parent.frob end end


0

browserify lets you use require within your client js files. Also you need game_core.js require p2 if you want to use p2 in the constructor. Your client file using browserify should look like this <script src="bundle.js"></script> <!-- browserify p2 game_core.js config.json ---> <script> var p2 = require('p2 '); var game_core= ...


4

This is a compiler bug. Please contact Franz. CG-USER(8): (disassemble (lambda-producer)) ;; disassembly of #<Closure Template Function (:INTERNAL LAMBDA-PRODUCER 0)> ;; formals: X ;; closure vectors: ;; 0: #<Closure (LABELS LAMBDA-PRODUCER PRODUCER-LABEL2) @ #xdfdda7a> ;; 1: #<Function (LABELS LAMBDA-PRODUCER PRODUCER-LABEL)> ...


4

The main problem you're describing--that the index can't be garbage collected--is solved by putting the index into a mutable box that you empty (null out) once the object is created. However, if you don't know when your object is created, and need the program to tell you (e.g. by knowing that all lazy vals have been populated), then you're out of luck. ...


3

What you are trying to do, is sort of called function currying. But again there is the words 'sort of'. This guides how to do it correctly, in case you are interested. Try to use closure exactly when you need it. Because closure can cause serious memory leaks if you dont know what you are doing. And google optimization says Creating a closure is ...


3

When I don't need the closure, I just call it twice like this: func()(parms); There's your reason not to do this. It's unnecessary most of the time, and generally unconventional. Stick to the basics so your code isn't a bizarre island unto itself. Not that the pattern is never appropriate - it is - but definitely don't do it all the time for no ...


0

I found quite some new Spark users are confused about how the mapper and reducer functions get run and how they are related to things defined in driver's program. In general, all the mapper/reducer functions you defined and registered by map or foreach or reduceByKey or many other variants will not get executed in your driver's program. In your driver's ...


9

Since you have a recursive type in there, you need to declare it explicitly: data T a = L [a] | F (a -> T a) (+>) (F f) = f unL (L x) = x eat xs x = if x == "vomit" then L $ reverse xs else F $ eat (x:xs) eaten = unL $ eat [""] "x" +> "y" +> "z" +> "vomit" {- *Main> eaten ["","x","y","z"] -} Defining eaten1 = eat [""] "x" +> "y" ...


1

You're misusing the word "closure". All functions are closures in Swift. So you just mean "function". A function can have a name. The way you show is one way to give a function a name: var c: ()->() = { println("X = \(x)") } But here's another way: func c() { println("X = \(x)") } That's right. Declaring a function is just a way of giving a ...


0

The problem is that any items in a rdd closure are copied and use local versions. foreach should only be used for saving to disk or something along those lines. If you want this in an array, then you can map and then collect rdd.map(row=> { val hConf = HBaseConfiguration.create() val hTable = new HTable(hConf, tablename) val hRow = new ...


0

You may also think in terms of parameters and arguments, like you would normally do in any other programming language. So, answering this question: why we can't just use "i" so the code reads like this theCelebrities[i]["id"] = function (i) { return function () { return uniqueID+ i; } () You can't, because i in function (i) is a ...


0

This has to do with variable scope in javascript. When you do return function () { return uniqueID+ i; } the anonymous function sees i which is incremented in the for loop. When the anonymous function is executed, i will be the last iterated value. i is seen in the loop and is preserved in the anonymous function. However, when you do function (j) ...


0

In the failing case (capturing i directly), when a closure captures i, it captures a reference to it, not a copy. Therefore, when the code in the closure runs, it uses the value of i at the time the closure code runs, rather than at the time the closure was created. And at the time the closure code runs, the value of i is theCelebrities.length because the ...


1

The anonymous function is a Callable which is passed to the function singleton in the object $app. The function singleton then calls the Callable (anonymous function) that you passed to it, and passes $app as argument into the anonymous function.


1

It's $this->app->singleton that passes $app to the callback closure when it is called.


2

The behavior you're reporting sounds very strange. First, I can't reproduce it with neither ECJ nor with javac 7. (See http://ideone.com/B4CoQs) The difference in bytecode between Outter.this.bar = bar; and Outter self = Outter.this; self.bar = bar; is just an extra astore_2/aload_2, which basically corresponds to a no-op. I encourage you to check ...


0

Try utilizing Function.prototype.toString() , Function function mainFunc(){ function f1(){ alert("f1"); } function f2(){ alert("f2"); } } function myFun(){ var f1 = ""; var res = mainFunc.toString().split("\n"); for (var i = 0; i < res.length; i++) { if (res[i].indexOf("f1") !== -1) { f1 += ...


0

You basically have to pass the function out or make it accessible some way There are numerous ways you can do this. Here is an example of using a callback function. So passing in a function as a parameter to mainFunc. The function you pass in is itself expecting two functions f1 anf f2 to be passed to it. function mainFunc(cb){ var f1 = function(){ ...


0

Try This. var mainFunc = new mainFunc(); function mainFunc(){ this.f1 = f1; this.f2 = f2; function f1(){ alert("f1"); } function f2(){ alert("f2"); } } function myFun(){ var data = mainFunc.f1(); }


0

Try returning an object that can still access the function defined in mainFunc's closure! A little messy, but hope it helps: function mainFunc(){ function f1(){ alert("f1"); } function f2(){ alert("f2"); } return { f1 : f1, f2 : f2 }; } function myFun(){ var data = mainFunc().f1(); } The idea behind closures is protection ...


2

If you create an object using mainFunc you can access the methods inside. function mainFunc(){ this.f1 = function (){ alert("f1"); } this.f2 = function(){ alert("f2"); } } function myFun(){ var mainObj = new mainFunc(); var data = mainObj.f1(); } myFun();


1

Calling methods in the same class are called with an implied self. In this case because of the closure you have to make it explicit: self.animateButton(aButton, step: 1)


0

Because you're calling the function, write this: settings = {direction: getSliderDIrection} Instead of settings = {direction: getSliderDIrection()}


4

On a very high level, yes, they are: both the blocks and the lambdas are said to implement closures. Very informally, they serve the same purpose of "packaging" executable logic together with data on which the logic operates, for the purpose of passing it around or storing for deferred execution. However, there are many important differences when you get ...


1

In javascript you d do that, all simply function addDocument(req, res) { // in scope Request.findById(req.body._id, function(error, request){ if (request) { req.whatever; // What is Request.findById for ? } else { res.send404('Couldn\'t find a request with that ID.'); } }); }


0

The problem is, that the handler is created in every iteration of your for loop, which means, that in the last iteration, the handler's reference to elem corresponds to the last map. So even if the handler is fired by click on another map, it sets center to the map which is stored in variable elem. But the singleclick event contains the map that was clicked, ...


1

At Point 1 you are passing a varialbe inc5 the returning result of a makeInc function, which will be another function inc with a local variable x set to 5. Then you call for this new function and pass a 7 as its one and only parameter y.


0

makeInc builds and returns a function (inc), which you assign to inc5. So when you call inc5 with the argument 7 it will return 12.


2

I can't understand why you think 7 should be assigned to x. The outer function makeInc returns the inner function inc, and it's that which you assign to inc5. So inc5 accepts the argument y, and that's what is bound to the value 7.


2

Yes, so long as you declare them @autoclosure(escaping): Declarations with the autoclosure attribute imply noescape as well, except when passed the optional attribute escaping. So this should do it: func myFunc(@autoclosure(escaping) condition: () -> Bool) { dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue()) { if condition() { ...


1

Are you trying to alert the number each 2000 milliseconds? If so, try this: function printNum(i, max) { alert(i); if (i == max) return; setTimeout(function () { printNum(i + 1, max); }, 2000); } printNum(0, 10); Otherwise, if you want to alert them after 2000 milliseconds one after the other: function printNum(i, max) { ...


1

Indeed, in Chrome it alerts them in random order. I fixed it just by adding i to the time, apparently then the alert queue is ordered properly: for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) { (function (i) { setTimeout(function () { alert(i); }, 2000+i); })(i); } https://jsfiddle.net/hqphbhx3/5/


2

You have to pass the parameters positionally, names aren't considered at all. You can map the parameters by name to their position using reflection: $params = array("a" => 1, "b" => 2, "c" => 3); $ref = new ReflectionFunction($function); $arguments = array_map( function (ReflectionParameter $param) use ($params) { if ...


0

ol.View won't fire events on singleclick. so if you're going to use evt.coordinate you need to be sure you're getting an ol.MapBroswerEvent. it's not clear where your array of ol.Maps is coming from, but once you have your maps in an array, (it appears) the loop should be written as: for (var i = 0; i < mapArray.length; i++) { var targetMap = ...


0

Just a guess, but I think your use of this in your options object is not the this you think it is... Try changing your implementation of surveyTimer, where it is currently: counterEnd(); to: counterEnd.call(options);


1

I've used almost exactly that approach before. I use an integer identifier, and increment it when issuing a new request. That way if the pending request is superseded by a new one you can just drop the stale response on the floor.


0

First it depends on which python version you are using. Pyhton3 creates lazy generators for most of iterators. So you could do something like: l2 = list([lambda: {f: 42} for f in range(3)]) or if you your lambda needs an input parameter l2 = list([lambda f: {f: 42} for f in range(3)])


3

You are assigning the last value of f to all the lambdas: gen = (lambda _,f=f: {f: 42} for f in range(3)) As @Jon Clements so kindly pointed out the term is lazy binding, which is described in Common_Gotchas_In_Python


0

I think you are trying to make the things harder: Here is how you can do it with closures: import math mymath = dict() def funcmaker(fun): print "creating %s function" % fun def calculate(val): print "calculating: %s" % fun return getattr(math, fun)(val) return calculate print funcmaker("sin")(math.pi) print ...


2

From this code (which works as you intended) my = {} def makefun(fun): def _impl(x): print fun, x return _impl for fun in ["cos", "sin"]: my[fun] = makefun(fun) # will print 'cos' my['cos'](1) fun = 'tan' # will print 'cos' my['cos'](2) it seems that it is not the namespace of the function definition which decides about the nature of the ...


6

The value of fun is evaluated when the function is called. In the example you provided, fun is a global variable, and it's value is "cos" after the for loop runs. I think you expect the value of fun to be substituted when you create the function, but it's not. The function evaluates the value of the variable when it runs just like it's supposed to. It's ...


0

With laravel 5 you can use where method on collection. $data = Model::where('something', 'stuff')->get(); $removedItem = $data->where('key', 'value'); Or if you use Larave 4 you can call filter method on collection $removedItem = $data->filter(function($item) use ($removedValue) { return $item->key == $removedValue; }); $data = ...



Top 50 recent answers are included