New answers tagged

1

This response is similar to response of @repeat predicates that below are implemented using the SICStus 4.3.2 tool after simple modification of gen_list(+,+,?) edit Code gen_list(Length,Sum,List) :- length(List,Length), domain(List,0,Sum), sum(List,#=,Sum), ...


4

Use clpfd! :- use_module(library(clpfd)). Using SWI-Prolog 7.3.16 we query: ?- length(Zs, 4), Zs ins 1..4, sum(Zs, #=, 7), labeling([], Zs). Zs = [1,1,1,4] ; Zs = [1,1,2,3] ; Zs = [1,1,3,2] ; Zs = [1,1,4,1] ; Zs = [1,2,1,3] ; Zs = [1,2,2,2] ; Zs = [1,2,3,1] ; Zs = [1,3,1,2] ; Zs = [1,3,2,1] ; Zs = [1,4,1,1] ; Zs = [2,1,1,3] ; Zs = ...


3

I use SWI-Prolog. You can write that :- use_module(library(lambda)). arrangement(K, S, L) :- % we have a list of K numbers length(L, K), % these numbers are between 1 (or 0) and S maplist(between(1, S), L), % the sum of these numbers is S foldl(\X^Y^Z^(Z is X+Y), L, 0, S). The result ?- arrangement(5, 10, L). L = [1, 1, 1, 1, 6] ...


2

TL;DR: The answers by @CAFEBABE, @CapelliC, @mat, and @sharky all fall short! So... what exactly are the shortcomings of the answers proposed earlier? @CAFEBABE's stated: Nice about this solution is that the runtime is linear in the length of both lists. Let's put that statement to the test! ?- numlist(1,1000,Zs), ...


2

(This just popped up on my dashboard hence the late answer...) I looked at the question and was thinking whether it is possible to provide a solution close to the original question. The problem, as already explained, is that the relation > needs its arguments instantiated. Actually similar for is. However, this can easily be fixed by reordering the ...


1

I mean, is there any way to say "the sum of VX, VY, VZ it's 2 or 3". If this is the crucial question, try this: (sum([VX,VY,VZ],#=,2);sum([VX,VY,VZ],#=,3))


1

Keeps getting better! In this answer we present list_long_nondecreasing_subseq__NEW/2, a drop-in replacement of list_long_nondecreasing_subseq/2—presented in this earlier answer. Let's cut to the chase and define list_long_nondecreasing_subseq__NEW/2! :- use_module([library(clpfd), library(lists), library(random), library(between)]). ...


3

Earlier, we presented a concise solution based on clpfd. Now we aim at generality and efficiency! :- use_module([library(clpfd), library(lists)]). list_long_nondecreasing_subseq(Zs, Xs) :- minimum(Min, Zs), append(_, Suffix, Zs), same_length(Suffix, Xs), zs_subseq_taken0(Zs, Xs, Min). zs_subseq_taken0([], [], _). zs_subseq_taken0([E|Es], ...


2

Use clpfd! :- use_module(library(clpfd)). No need to worry about using clpfd for the 1st time—you'll get the meaning in a moment for sure! smallerCube_(X, Remainder, Maximum) :- X #>= 0, Remainder #>= 0, Remainder + X^3 #= Maximum. First, the most general query of smallerCube_/3: ?- smallerCube_(X, Remainder, ...


2

TL;DR: In this answer we implement a very general approach based on clpfd. :- use_module(library(clpfd)). list_nondecreasing_subseq(Zs, Xs) :- append(_, Suffix, Zs), same_length(Suffix, Xs), chain(Xs, #=<), list_subseq(Zs, Xs). % a.k.a. subset/2 by @gusbro Sample query using SWI-Prolog 7.3.16: ?- ...


1

The issue is that as you are traversing the list building subsequences, you need to consider only prior subsequences whose last value is less than the value you have in-hand. The problem is that Prolog's first-argument indexing is doing an equality check, not a less-than check. So Prolog will have to traverse the entire store of lns/2, unifying the first ...


2

We assume all numbers of relevance here are integers. With SWI-Prolog, we can use clpfd: :- use_module(library(clpfd)). Next, we define predicate cubeLess/3 like this: cubeLess(X, B, R) :- B #= X^3 + R. Sample query: ?- cubeLess(2, 10, R). R = 2. How about the most general query? ?- cubeLess(X, B, R). X^3 #= _A, _A+R #= B. Not much ...


2

As @lurker already said in his comment, use CLP(FD) constraints. In addition, I recommend: instead of solve/1, use a declarative name like solution/1. You should describe what holds for a solution, so that the relation makes sense in all directions, also for example if the solution is already given and you want to validate it. By convention, it makes ...


1

I have better solution, @CapelliC code takes very long time for squares with N length higher than 5. :- use_module(library(clpfd)). make_square(0,_,[]) :- !. make_square(I,N,[Row|Rest]) :- length(Row,N), I1 is I - 1, make_square(I1,N,Rest). all_different_in_row([]) :- !. all_different_in_row([Row|Rest]) :- all_different(Row), ...



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